World  Sacred  Scriptures



The wisdom of The Doctrine of Filial Piety

Onelittleangel > Confucianism > The Doctrine of Filial Piety
47  quote(s)  | Page 1 / 1





I t [filial piety] commences with the service of parents; it proceeds to the service of the ruler; it is completed by the establishment of character.




Confucianism 8939 | 
The Doctrine of Filial Piety, Chapter I: The Scope and Meaning of the Treatise 







F ilial piety is the root of (all) virtue, and (the stem) out of which grows (all moral) teaching.




Confucianism 8938 | 
The Doctrine of Filial Piety, Chapter I: The Scope and Meaning of the Treatise 







T he ancient kings had a perfect virtue and all-embracing rule of conduct, through which they were in accord with all under heaven. By the practice of it the people were brought to live in peace and harmony, and there was no ill-will between superiors and inferiors.




Confucianism 8937 | 
The Doctrine of Filial Piety, Chapter I: The Scope and Meaning of the Treatise 







O ur bodies—to every hair and bit of skin—are received by us from our parents, and we must not presume to injure or wound them. This is the beginning of filial piety.




Confucianism 8936 | 
The Doctrine of Filial Piety, Chapter I: The Scope and Meaning of the Treatise 







W hen we have established our character by the practice of the (filial) course, so as to make our name famous in future ages and thereby glorify our parents, this is the end of filial piety.




Confucianism 8935 | 
The Doctrine of Filial Piety, Chapter I: The Scope and Meaning of the Treatise 







T herefore when they serve their ruler with filial piety, they are loyal; when they serve their superiors with reverence, they are obedient. Not failing in this loyalty and obedience in serving those above them, they are then able to preserve their emoluments and positions, and to maintain their sacrifices. This is the filial piety of inferior officers.




Confucianism 8934 | 
The Doctrine of Filial Piety, Chapter IV: Filial Piety in Inferior Officers  







S o even if their words were to pervade the entire earth, no errors would be found in them; even if their actions were to fill the entire earth, nothing contemptible would be found in them.




Confucianism 8933 | 
The Doctrine of Filial Piety, Chapter IV: Filial Piety in High Ministers and Great Officers  







T hus none of their words being contrary to those sanctions, and none of their actions contrary to the (right) way, from their mouths there comes no exceptionable speech, and in their conduct there are found no exceptionable actions.




Confucianism 8932 | 
The Doctrine of Filial Piety, Chapter IV: Filial Piety in High Ministers and Great Officers  







T hose who threaten the lords have no regard for their superiors, those who vilify the sages have no regard for the law, and those who oppose filial piety have no regard for their parents—these are the root causes of anarchy.




Confucianism 8931 | 
The Doctrine of Filial Piety, Chapter XI: Filial Piety in Relation to the Five Punishments  







T herefore when a case of unrighteous conduct is concerned, a son must by no means keep from remonstrating with his father, nor a minister from remonstrating with his ruler.




Confucianism 8930 | 
The Doctrine of Filial Piety, Chapter XV: Filial Piety in Relation to Reproof and Remonstrance 







A nd the father who had a son that would remonstrate with him would not sink into the gulf of unrighteous deeds.




Confucianism 8929 | 
The Doctrine of Filial Piety, Chapter XV: Filial Piety in Relation to Reproof and Remonstrance  







T herefore, when his conduct is thus successful in his inner (private) circle, his name will be established (and transmitted) to future generations.




Confucianism 8928 | 
The Doctrine of Filial Piety, Chapter XIV: Amplification of “Making our Name Famous” in Chapter I  







T he fraternal duty with which he serves his elder brother may be transferred as submissive deference to elders.




Confucianism 8927 | 
The Doctrine of Filial Piety, Chapter XIV: Amplification of “Making our Name Famous” in Chapter I  







T he filial piety with which the superior man serves his parents may be transferred as loyalty to the ruler.




Confucianism 8926 | 
The Doctrine of Filial Piety, Chapter XIV: Amplification of “Making our Name Famous” in Chapter I  







H is regulation of his family may be transferred as good government in any official position.




Confucianism 8925 | 
The Doctrine of Filial Piety, Chapter XIV: Amplification of “Making our Name Famous” in Chapter I  







T he teaching of filial piety by the superior man does not require that he should go to family after family and daily see the members of each. His teaching of filial piety is a tribute of reverence to all the fathers under heaven. His teaching of fraternal submission is a tribute of reverence to all the elder brothers under heaven. His teaching of the duty of a subject is a tribute of reverence to all the rulers under heaven.




Confucianism 8924 | 
The Doctrine of Filial Piety, Chapter XIII: Amplification of “the Perfect Virtue” in Chapter I  







T he superior man serves his ruler in such a way that, when at court in his presence, his thought is how to discharge his loyal duty to the utmost, and when he retires from it, his thought is how to amend his errors. He carries out with deference the measures springing from his excellent qualities and rectifies him (only) to save him from what are evil. Hence, as the superior and inferior, they are able to have affection for each other.




Confucianism 8923 | 
The Doctrine of Filial Piety, Chapter XVII: The Service of the Ruler  







P erfect filial piety and fraternal duty reach to (and move) the spiritual intelligences and diffuse their light on all within the four seas. They penetrate everywhere.




Confucianism 8922 | 
The Doctrine of Filial Piety, Chapter XVI: The Influence of Filial Piety and the Response to It  







E ven the king has others to whom he must give honour, namely his parents, and those to whom he must give precedence, namely his elder brothers. When he offers sacrifices to his ancestors, he gives them the highest reverence to show that he has not neglected his parents. He cultivates his moral character and guards his conduct, lest he might disgrace his royal ancestors.




Confucianism 8921 | 
The Doctrine of Filial Piety, Chapter XVI: The Influence of Filial Piety and the Response to It  







F or teaching the people to be affectionate and loving, there is nothing better than filial piety. For teaching them (the observance of) propriety and submissiveness, there is nothing better than fraternal duty. For changing their manners and altering their customs, there is nothing better than music. For securing the repose of superiors and the good order of the people, there is nothing better than the rules of propriety.




Confucianism 8920 | 
The Doctrine of Filial Piety, Chapter XII: Amplification of “The All-embracing Rule of Conduct” 







T he rules of propriety are simply (the development of) the principle of reverence.




Confucianism 8919 | 
Chapter XII: Amplification of “The All-embracing Rule of Conduct”  







T he services of love and reverence to parents when alive, and those of grief and sorrow to them when dead: these completely discharge the fundamental duty of living men. The righteous claims of life and death are all satisfied, and the filial son's service of his parents is completed.




Confucianism 8918 | 
The Doctrine of Filial Piety, Chapter XVIII: Filial Piety in Mourning for Parents  







H e who (thus) serves his parents, in a high situation will be free from pride, in a low situation will be free from insubordination, and among his equals will not be quarrelsome.




Confucianism 8917 | 
The Doctrine of Filial Piety, Chapter X: An Orderly Description of the Acts of Filial Piety  







I n a high situation pride leads to ruin; in a low situation insubordination leads to punishment; among equals quarrelsomeness leads to the wielding of weapons. If those three things be not put away, though a son every day contributes beef, mutton, and pork to nourish his parents, he is not filial.




Confucianism 8916 | 
The Doctrine of Filial Piety, Chapter X: An Orderly Description of the Acts of Filial Piety  







I n his general conduct to them, he manifests the utmost reverence. In his nourishing of them, his endeavor is to give them the utmost pleasure. When they are ill, he feels the greatest anxiety. In mourning for them (dead), he exhibits every demonstration of grief. In sacrificing to them, he displays the utmost solemnity. When a son is complete in these five things, (he may be pronounced) able to serve his parents.




Confucianism 8915 | 
The Doctrine of Filial Piety, Chapter X: An Orderly Description of the Acts of Filial Piety  







A bove others, and yet free from pride, they dwell on high, without peril. Adhering to economy and carefully observant of the rules and laws, they are full, without overflowing.




Confucianism 8914 | 
The Doctrine of Filial Piety, Chapter III: The Overlords of the States  







T o dwell on high without peril is the way long to preserve nobility; to be full without overflowing is the way long to preserve riches.




Confucianism 8913 | 
The Doctrine of Filial Piety, Chapter III: The Overlords of the States  







W hen they are able to preserve their nobility and wealth, they perpetuate the security of their state, and bring harmony to the people. This is filial piety of the overlords of the states.




Confucianism 8912 | 
The Doctrine of Filial Piety, Chapter III: The Overlords of the States  







T hey were most respectful and courteous to the people, so there were no rivalry or competition among them.




Confucianism 8911 | 
The Doctrine of Filial Piety, Chapter VII: Filial Piety in Relation to the Three Powers  







T he ancient kings set the moral standard and acted as role models by loving everyone without discrimination, so the people did not dare to forsake or neglect their parents.




Confucianism 8910 | 
The Doctrine of Filial Piety, Chapter VII: Filial Piety in Relation to the Three Powers  







F ilial piety is the constant (method) of Heaven, the righteousness of Earth, and the practical duty of Man.




Confucianism 8909 | 
The Doctrine of Filial Piety, Chapter VII: Filial Piety in Relation to the Three Powers  







T hey guided the people with moral precepts and with the help of the proprieties and arts, so people lived in peace and harmony.




Confucianism 8908 | 
The Doctrine of Filial PietyChapter VII: Filial Piety in Relation to the Three Powers  







T hey explained to the people the truths about virtue and righteousness, and so people put them into practice.




Confucianism 8907 | 
The Doctrine of Filial Piety, Chapter VII: Filial Piety in Relation to the Three Powers  







T hey demonstrated to people behaviours that are pleasant or detestable, so people understood what should be prohibited.




Confucianism 8906 | 
The Doctrine of Filial Piety, Chapter VII: Filial Piety in Relation to the Three Powers  







T hey follow the course of heaven (in the revolving seasons); they distinguish the advantages afforded by (different) soils; they are careful of their conduct and economical in their expenditure—in order to nourish their parents. This is the filial piety of the common people.




Confucianism 8905 | 
The Doctrine of Filial Piety, Chapter VI: Filial Piety in the Common People  







F ilial piety, the duty of every person from the king to the commoner, is the supreme and eternal principle of life and morality. There has never been anyone who is willing to fulfil this duty yet fails to do so.




Confucianism 8904 | 
The Doctrine of Filial Piety, Chapter VI: Filial Piety in the Common People  







H e speaks, having thought whether the words should be spoken; he acts, having thought whether his actions are sure to give pleasure. His virtue and righteousness are such as will be honored; what he initiates and does is fit to be imitated; his deportment is worthy of contemplation; his movements in advancing or retiring are all according to the proper rule. In this way does he present himself to the people.




Confucianism 8903 | 
The Doctrine of Filial Piety, Chapter IX: Governance of the Sages  







O f all (creatures with their different) natures produced by Heaven and Earth, man is the noblest. Of all the actions of man there is none greater than filial piety.




Confucianism 8902 | 
The Doctrine of Filial Piety, Chapter IX: Governance of the Sages  







[ The people] who both revere and love him, imitate and become like him. Thus he is able to make his teaching of virtue successful, and his government and orders to be carried into effect.




Confucianism 8901 | 
The Doctrine of Filial Piety, Chapter IX: Governance of the Sages  







H e who honours other people but honours not his parents is defying proprieties.




Confucianism 8900 | 
The Doctrine of Filial Piety, Chapter IX: Governance of the Sages  







H e who loves other people but loves not his parents is defying virtue.




Confucianism 8899 | 
The Doctrine of Filial Piety, Chapter IX: Governance of the Sages  







O ut of the feeling of reverence for their parents, the sages taught the duty of respect for others; out of the feeling of affection for parents, they impart the teaching of love for others. Thus, the teachings of the sages were accomplished without being too regimental, and their government was efficient without being overly stringent.




Confucianism 8898 | 
The Doctrine of Filial Piety, Chapter IX: Governance of the Sages  







H e who loves his parents does not dare to hate other people, and he who honours his parents does not dare to despise others.




Confucianism 8897 | 
The Doctrine of Filial Piety, Chapter II: The King  







C ompletely fulfil his duty of loving and honouring his parents; extend the virtue education to all people, act as a role model for the rest of the world; this is the filial piety of the king.




Confucianism 8896 | 
The Doctrine of Filial Piety, Chapter II: The King  







T he heads of clans did not dare to slight their servants and concubines. How much less would they slight their wives and sons! Thus it was that they got their men with joyful hearts (to assist them) in the service of their parents.




Confucianism 8895 | 
The Doctrine of Filial Piety, Chapter VIII: Governance by Filial Piety  







T he rulers of states did not dare to slight wifeless men and widows. How much less would they slight their officers and the people! Thus it was that they got all their people with joyful hearts (to assist them) in serving the rulers, their predecessors.




Confucianism 8894 | 
The Doctrine of Filial Piety, Chapter VIII: Governance by Filial Piety  







W hen the ancient kings, in their great wisdom, governed the country by filial piety, they did not dare to look down upon even the officials of the small states, let alone the aristocrats (the dukes, marquises, earls, viscounts, and barons) of the larger states! That was why the state overlords were willing and glad to assist the king in serving his ancestors and perpetuating his dynasty.




Confucianism 8893 | 
The Doctrine of Filial Piety, Chapter VIII: Governance by Filial Piety  





Page:  1





Share this Webpage on social media








Home | ♥ Our Project ♥ ⇄ ♥ Your project ♥