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Extracts of the The Upanishads

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W hen the whole mantram … goes on reverberating in the mind, One is freed from fear, awake or asleep… Established in this cosmic vibration, the sage goes beyond fear, decay, and death to enter into infinite peace.




Hinduism 3221 | 
Prashna Up. Question 5, 6-7, p. 166 in The Upanishads. Trans. Eknath Easwaran. Tomales, CA.: Nilgiri Press, 1987 







B rahman is the first cause and last refuge.
Brahman, the hidden Self in everyone,
Does not shine forth. He is revealed only
To those who keep their mind one-pointed
On the Lord of Love and thus develop
A superconscious manner of knowing.
Meditation enables them to go
Deeper and deeper into consciousness,
From the world of words to the world of thoughts,
Then beyond thoughts to wisdom in the Self.





Hinduism 3220 | 
Katha Up. Part 1, 3:11-13, p. 89 in The Upanishads. Trans. Eknath Easwaran. Tomales, CA.: Nilgiri Press, 1987 







B rahman is beyond all duality, beyond the reach of thinker and thought.




Hinduism 3219 | 
Tejabindu Up. 6, p. 240 in The Upanishads. Trans. Eknath Easwaran. Tomales, CA.: Nilgiri Press, 1987 







C ovet nothing. All belongs to the Lord. Thus working you may live a hundred years. Thus alone will you work in real freedom.




Hinduism 3218 | 
Isha Up. 1-2, p. 208 in The Upanishads. Trans. Eknath Easwaran. Tomales, CA.: Nilgiri Press, 1987 







I n the secret cave of the heart, two are seated by life's fountain.
The separate ego drinks of the sweet and bitter stuff,
Liking the sweet, disliking the bitter,
While the supreme Self drinks sweet and bitter
Neither liking this nor disliking that.
The ego gropes in darkness, while the Self lives in light.





Hinduism 3217 | 
Katha Up. Part 1, 3:1, p. 88 in The Upanishads. Trans. Eknath Easwaran. Tomales, CA.: Nilgiri Press, 1987 







A person is what his deep desire is. It is our deepest desire in this life that shapes the life to come. So let us direct our deepest desires to realize the Self.




Hinduism 3216 | 
Chandogya Up. Chapter 3, 14:1, p. 177 in The Upanishads. Trans. Eknath Easwaran. Tomales, CA.: Nilgiri Press, 1987 







W hen all desires that surge in the heart are renounced, the mortal becomes immortal.




Hinduism 3215 | 
Katha Up. Part 2, 3:14, p. 97 in The Upanishads. Trans. Eknath Easwaran. Tomales, CA.: Nilgiri Press, 1987 







T hose who dwell on and long for sense-pleasure are born in a world of separateness.
But let them realize they are the Self and all separateness will fall away.





Hinduism 3214 | 
Mundaka Up. Part 3, 2:2, p. 116 in The Upanishads. Trans. Eknath Easwaran. Tomales, CA.: Nilgiri Press, 1987 







L ike two golden birds perched on the selfsame tree, intimate friends, the ego and the Self dwell in the same body. The former eats the sweet and sour fruits of the tree of life while the latter looks on in detachment. As long as we think we are the ego, we feel attached and fall into sorrow. But realize that you are the Self, the Lord of life, and you will be freed from sorrow. When you realize that you are the Self, supreme source of light, supreme source of love, you transcend the duality of life and enter into the unitive state.




Hinduism 3213 | 
Mundada Up. 3:1-3, p. 115; also compare Shvetashvatara Up. 4:6, p. 225 in The Upanishads. Trans. Eknath Easwaran. Tomales, CA.: Nilgiri Press, 1987 







T here are two selves, the separate ego and the indivisible Atman. When one rises above I and me and mine, the Atman is revealed as one's real Self.




Hinduism 3212 | 
Katha Up. Part 2, 3:13, p. 97 in The Upanishads. Trans. Eknath Easwaran. Tomales, CA.: Nilgiri Press, 1987 







B right but hidden, the Self dwells in the heart. Everything that moves, breathes, opens, and closes lives in the Self. He is the source of love and may be known through love but not through thought. He is the goal of life. Attain this goal!




Hinduism 3211 | 
Mundaka Up. Part 2, 2:1, p. 113 in The Upanishads. Trans. Eknath Easwaran. Tomales, CA.: Nilgiri Press, 1987 







T he ignorant think the Self can be known by the intellect, but the illumined know he is beyond the duality of the knower and the known.




Hinduism 3210 | 
Kena Up. 2:3, pp. 69-70 in The Upanishads. Trans. Eknath Easwaran. Tomales, CA.: Nilgiri Press, 1987 







Y ou are the supreme Brahman, infinite, yet hidden in the hearts of all creatures. You pervade everything.




Hinduism 3209 | 
Shvetashvatara Up. 3:7, p.223 in The Upanishads. Trans. Eknath Easwaran. Tomales, CA.: Nilgiri Press, 1987 







M editate and realize this world is filled with the presence of God.




Hinduism 3208 | 
Shvetashvatara Up. 1:12, p.219 in The Upanishads. Trans. Eknath Easwaran. Tomales, CA.: Nilgiri Press, 1987 







T he supreme Self is neither born nor dies. He cannot be burned, moved, pierced, cut, nor dried. Beyond all attributes, the supreme Self is the eternal witness, ever pure, indivisible, and uncompounded, far beyond the senses and the ego… He is omnipresent, beyond all thought, without action in the external world, without action in the internal world. Detached from the outer and the inner, This supreme Self purifies the impure.




Hinduism 3207 | 
Atma Up. 3, p. 242 in The Upanishads. Trans. Eknath Easwaran. Tomales, CA.: Nilgiri Press, 1987 







D welling in every heart,
the Self is the Lord of all,
the seer of all,
the source and goal of all.
The Self is not outer awareness,
It is not inner awareness,
Nor is it the suspension of awareness.
It is not knowing,
It is not unknowing,
Nor is it knowingness itself
It cannot be seen nor grasped,
It cannot be contained.
It is beyond all expression and beyond
all thought.
It is indefinable.

The only way to know it is to become it.

It is the final resting place of all activity,
silent and unchanging,
the Supreme Good,
One without a second.
It is the Supreme Self
It, above all else, should be known.





Hinduism 3009 | 
Mandukya Upanishad 







T hough the Infinite One is without color,
He colors the entire universe;
Though immortal,
He is born, and lives, and dies.
That One is all that was, and is, and will be,
Yet He is always the same.

He is the Supreme, Unchanging, Absolute.

He becomes the fire, the sun,
The wind, and the moon.
He becomes the starry heavens,
And the vast waters, giving life to all.

He becomes the woman, the man,
The youth, and the maiden too.
He becomes the old fellow
Tottering on his staff.
He becomes every face
Looking in every direction.

He becomes the blue butterfly,
The green parrot with red eyes.
He becomes lightning, the seasons,
The endless seas.

Without birth or death,
Beyond all time and space,
He is the One from whom
All the worlds are born.





Hinduism 3008 | 
Shvetashvatara Upanishad 







A UM STANDS for the supreme Reality.
It is a symbol for what was, what is,
And what shall be. AUM represents also
What lies beyond past, present, and future.





Hinduism 2658 | 
Mandukya Upanishad, translated by Eknath Easwaran, 1987; Nilgiri Press, Tomales, California 







B rahman is all, and the Self is Brahman.
This Self has four states of consciousness.

The first is called Vaishvanara, in which
One lives with all the senses turned outward,
Aware only of the external world.

Taijasa is the name of the second,
The dreaming state in which, with the senses
Turned inward, one enacts the impressions
Of past deeds and present desires.

The third state is called Prajna, of deep sleep,
In which one neither dreams nor desires.
There is no mind in Prajna, there is no
Separateness; but the sleeper is not
Conscious of this.
Let him become conscious
In Prajna and it will open the door
To the state of abiding joy.

Prajna, all-powerful and all-knowing,
Dwells in the hearts of all as the ruler.
Prajna is the source and end of all.

The fourth is the superconscious state called
Turiya, neither inward nor outward,
Beyond the senses and the intellect,
In which there is none other than the Lord.
He is the supreme goal of life.
He is Infinite peace and love. Realize him!





Hinduism 2657 | 
Mandukya Upanishad, translated by Eknath Easwaran, 1987; Nilgiri Press, Tomales, California 







A s a man in the arms of his beloved is not aware of what is without and what is within, so a person in union with the Self is not aware of what is without and what is within, for in that unitive state all desires find their perfect fulfillment. There is no other desire that needs to be fulfilled, and one goes beyond sorrow.
In that unitive state there is neither father nor mother, neither worlds nor gods nor even scriptures. In that state there is neither thief nor slayer, neither low caste nor high, neither monk nor ascetic. The Self is beyond good and evil, beyond all the suffering of the human heart.

In that unitive state one sees without seeing, for there is nothing separate from him; smells without smelling, for there is nothing separate from him; tastes without tasting, for there is nothing separate from him; speaks without speaking, for there is nothing separate from him; hears without hearing, for there is nothing separate from him; touches without touching, for there is nothing separate from him; thinks without thinking, for there is nothing separate from him-, knows without knowing, for there is nothing separate from him.

Where there is separateness, one sees another, smells another, tastes another, speaks to another, hears another, touches another, thinks of another, knows another. But where there is unity, one without a second, that is the world of Brahman. This is the supreme goal of life, the supreme treasure, the supreme joy. Those who do not seek this supreme goal live on but a fraction of this joy.





Hinduism 2656 | 
Brihadaranyaka Upanishad, translated by Eknath Easwaran, 1987; Nilgiri Press, Tomales, California 







T he human being has two states of consciousness: one in this world, the other in the next. But there is a third state between them, not unlike the world of dreams, in which we are aware of both worlds, with their sorrows and joys. When a person dies, it is only the physical body that dies; that person lives on in a nonphysical body, which carries the impressions of his past life. It is these impressions that determine his next life. In this intermediate state he makes and dissolves impressions by the light of the Self.




Hinduism 2655 | 
Brihadaranyaka Upanishad, translated by Eknath Easwaran, 1987; Nilgiri Press, Tomales, California 







N o more questions have they to ask of life.
With self-will extinguished, they are at peace.
Seeing the Lord of Love in all around,

Serving the Lord of Love in all around,
They are united with him forever.
They have attained the summit of wisdom
By the steep path of renunciation.
They have attained to immortality
And are united with the Lord of Love.
When they leave the body, the vital force
Returns to the cosmic womb, but their work
Becomes a beneficial force in life
To bring others together in the Self.





Hinduism 2654 | 
Mundaka Upanishad, translated by Eknath Easwaran, 1987; Nilgiri Press, Tomales, California 







N ot through discourse, not through the intellect,
Not even through study of the scriptures
Can the Self be realized. The Self reveals
Himself to the one who longs for the Self.
Those who long for the Self with all their heart
Are chosen by the Self as his own.

Not by the weak, not by the unearnest,
Not by those who practice wrong disciplines
Can the Self be realized. The Self reveals
Himself as the Lord of Love to the one
Who practices right disciplines.





Hinduism 2653 | 
Mundaka Upanishad, translated by Eknath Easwaran, 1987; Nilgiri Press, Tomales, California 







T hose who dwell on and long for sense-pleasure
Are born in a world of separateness.
But let them realize they are the Self
And all separateness will fall away.





Hinduism 2652 | 
Mundaka Upanishad, translated by Eknath Easwaran, 1987; Nilgiri Press, Tomales, California 







T HE wise have attained the unitive state,
And see only the resplendent Lord of Love.
Desiring nothing in the physical world,
They have become one with the Lord of Love.





Hinduism 2651 | 
Mundaka Upanishad, translated by Eknath Easwaran, 1987; Nilgiri Press, Tomales, California 







T hose who attain the supreme goal of
Realizing the Self and passing beyond
All sorrow, shine bright as a mirror
Which has been cleansed of dust.

In the supreme climax of samadhi
They realize the presence of the Lord
Within their heart. Freed from impurities,
They pass forever beyond birth and death.





Hinduism 2650 | 
Shvetashvatara Upanishad, translated by Eknath Easwaran, 1987; Nilgiri Press, Tomales, California 







I n deep meditation aspirants may
See forms like snow or smoke.
They may feel a strong wind blowing or a wave of heat.
They may see within them more and more light:
Fireflies, lightning, sun, or moon. These are signs
That one is far on the path to Brahman.

Health, a light body, freedom from cravings,
A glowing skin, sonorous voice, fragrance
Of body: these signs indicate progress
In the practice of meditation.





Hinduism 2649 | 
Shvetashvatara Upanishad, translated by Eknath Easwaran, 1987; Nilgiri Press, Tomales, California 







G reat is the glory of the Lord of Life,
Infinite, omnipresent, all-knowing.
He is known by the wise who meditate
And conserve their vital energy.

Hear, 0 children of immortal bliss,
You are born to be united with the Lord.
Follow the path of the illumined ones
And be united with the Lord of Life.

Kindle the fire of kundalini deep
In meditation. Bring your mind and breath
Under control. Drink deep of divine love,
And you will attain the unitive state.

Dedicate yourself to the Lord of Life,
Who is the cause of the cosmos.
He will Remove the cause of all your suffering
And free you from the bondage of karma.

Be seated with spinal column erect
And turn your senses and mind deep within.
With the mantram echoing in your heart,
Cross over the dread sea of birth and death.

Train your senses to be obedient.
Regulate your activities to lead you
To the goal. Hold the reins of your mind
As you hold the reins of restive horses.





Hinduism 2648 | 
Shvetashvatara Upanishad, translated by Eknath Easwaran, 1987; Nilgiri Press, Tomales, California 







M AY WE HARNESS body and mind to see
The Lord of Life, who dwells in everyone.
May we ever with one-pointed mind
Strive for blissful union with the Lord.
May we train our senses to serve the Lord
Through the practice of meditation.





Hinduism 2647 | 
Shvetashvatara Upanishad, translated by Eknath Easwaran, 1987; Nilgiri Press, Tomales, California 







W hat use are the scriptures to anyone
Who knows not the one source from whom they come,
In whom A gods and worlds abide?
Only those who realize him as ever present
Within the heart attain abiding joy.





Hinduism 2646 | 
Shvetashvatara Upanishad, translated by Eknath Easwaran, 1987; Nilgiri Press, Tomales, California 







F orgetting our divine origin,
We become ensnared in the world of change
And bewail our helplessness.
But when We see the Lord of Love in all his glory,
Adored by all, we go beyond sorrow.





Hinduism 2645 | 
Shvetashvatara Upanishad, translated by Eknath Easwaran, 1987; Nilgiri Press, Tomales, California 







T wo birds of beautiful plumage, comrades
Inseparable, live on the selfsame tree.
One bird eats the fruit of pleasure and pain;
The other looks on without eating.





Hinduism 2644 | 
Shvetashvatara Upanishad, translated by Eknath Easwaran, 1987; Nilgiri Press, Tomales, California 







M AY THE LORD of Love, who projects himself
into this universe Of myriad forms,
From whom all beings come and to whom all
Return, grant us the grace of wisdom.

He is fire and the sun, and the moon
And the stars. He is the air and the sea,
And the Creator, Prajapati.
He is this boy, he is that girl, he is
This man, he is that woman, and he is
This old man, too, tottering on his staff.
His face is everywhere.

He is the blue bird, he is the green bird
With red eyes; he is the thundercloud,
And he is the seasons and the seas.
He has no beginning, he has no end.
He is the source from which the worlds evolve.

From his divine power comes forth all this
Magical show of name and form, of you
And me, which casts the spell of pain and pleasure.
Only when we pierce through this magic veil
Do we see the One who appears as many.





Hinduism 2643 | 
Shvetashvatara Upanishad, translated by Eknath Easwaran, 1987; Nilgiri Press, Tomales, California 







M AY THE LORD of Love, who projects himself
into this universe Of myriad forms,
From whom all beings come and to whom all
Return, grant us the grace of wisdom.





Hinduism 2642 | 
Shvetashvatara Upanishad, translated by Eknath Easwaran, 1987; Nilgiri Press, Tomales, California 







I HAVE REALIZED the Lord of Love,
is the sun that dispels our dark-ness.
Those who realize him go beyond death;
No other way is there to immortality.

There is nothing higher than him, nothing other
Than him. His infinity is beyond great
And small. In his own glory rooted,
He stands and fills the cosmos.
He fills the cosmos, yet he transcends it.
Those who know him leave all separateness,
Sorrow, and death behind.
Those who know him not
Live but suffer.

The Lord of Love, omnipresent, dwelling
In the heart of every living creature,
All mercy, turns every face to himself.

He is the supreme Lord, who through his grace
Moves us to seek him in our own hearts.
He is the light that shines forever.

He is the inner Self of all,
Hidden like a little flame in the heart.
Only by the stilled mind can he be known.
Those who realize him become immortal.





Hinduism 2641 | 
Shvetashvatara Upanishad, translated by Eknath Easwaran, 1987; Nilgiri Press, Tomales, California 







T he Self, in the very depths of consciousness.
Realize him through truth and meditation.
The Self is hidden in the hearts of all,
As butter lies hidden in cream. Realize
The Self in the depths of meditation -
The Lord of Love, supreme Reality,
Who is the goal of all knowledge.





Hinduism 2640 | 
Shvetashvatara Upanishad, translated by Eknath Easwaran, 1987; Nilgiri Press, Tomales, California 







K now him to be enshrined in your heart always
Truly there is nothing more in life to know.
Meditate and realize this world
Is filled with the presence of God.





Hinduism 2639 | 
Shvetashvatara Upanishad, translated by Eknath Easwaran, 1987; Nilgiri Press, Tomales, California 







K now God and all fetters will fall away.
No longer identifying yourself
With the body, go beyond birth and death.
All your desires will be fulfilled in him
Who is One without a second.





Hinduism 2638 | 
Shvetashvatara Upanishad, translated by Eknath Easwaran, 1987; Nilgiri Press, Tomales, California 







A LL IS CHANGE in the world of the senses
But changeless is the supreme Lord of Love.
Meditate on him, be absorbed in him,
Wake up from this dream of separateness.





Hinduism 2637 | 
Shvetashvatara Upanishad, translated by Eknath Easwaran, 1987; Nilgiri Press, Tomales, California 







P lease, Father, tell me more about this Self."

"Yes, dear one, I will," Uddalaka said.
"Place this salt in water and bring it here Tomorrow morning."
The boy did. "Where is that salt?" his father asked.

“I do not see it."

"Sip here. How does it taste”

"Salty, Father."

"And here? And there?"

“I taste salt everywhere."

“It is everywhere, though we sec it not.
Just sol dear one, the Self is everywhere,
Within all things, although we see him not.
There is nothing that does not come from him.
Of everything he is the inmost Self.
He is the truth; he is the Self supreme.
You are that, Shvetaketu; you are that."





Hinduism 2636 | 
Chandogya Upanishad, translated by Eknath Easwaran, 1987; Nilgiri Press, Tomales, California 







I n dark night live those for whom
The world without alone is real; in night
Darker still, for whom the world within
Alone is real. The first leads to a life
Of action, the second to a life of meditation.
But those who combine action with meditation
Cross the sea of death through action
And enter into immortality
Through the practice of meditation.
So have we heard from the wise.





Hinduism 2635 | 
Isha Upanishad, translated by Eknath Easwaran, 1987; Nilgiri Press, Tomales, California 







T he Self is everywhere. Bright is the Self,
Indivisible, untouched by sin, wise,
Immanent and transcendent.
He it is Who holds the cosmos together.





Hinduism 2634 | 
Isha Upanishad, translated by Eknath Easwaran, 1987; Nilgiri Press, Tomales, California 







T hose who see all creatures in themselves
And themselves in all creatures know no fear.
Those who see all creatures in themselves
And themselves in all creatures know no grief.
How can the multiplicity of life
Delude the one who sees its unity?





Hinduism 2633 | 
Isha Upanishad, translated by Eknath Easwaran, 1987; Nilgiri Press, Tomales, California 







T hose who deny the Self are born again
Blind to the Self, enveloped in darkness,
Utterly devoid of love for the Lord.

The Self is one. Ever still, the Self is
Swifter than thought, swifter than the senses.
Though motionless, he outruns all pursuit.
Without the Self, never could life exist.

The Self seems to move, but is ever still.
He seems far away, but is ever near.
He is within all, and he transcends all.





Hinduism 2632 | 
Isha Upanishad, translated by Eknath Easwaran, 1987; Nilgiri Press, Tomales, California 







T HE LORD is enshrined in the hearts of all.
The Lord is the supreme Reality.
Rejoice in him through renunciation.
Covet nothing. All belongs to the Lord.
Thus working may you live a hundred years.
Thus alone will you work in real freedom.





Hinduism 2631 | 
Isha Upanishad, translated by Eknath Easwaran, 1987; Nilgiri Press, Tomales, California 







S eek to know Brahman by tapas,
by prayer, because Brahman is prayer





Hinduism 2630 | 
Taittiriya Upanishad, translated by Juan Mascaro (Penguin Classics, 1965), copyright Juan Mascaro, 1965. 







S eek to know him from whom all beings have come,
by whom they all live, and unto whom they all return.
He is Brahman.





Hinduism 2629 | 
Taittiriya Upanishad, translated by Juan Mascaro (Penguin Classics, 1965), copyright Juan Mascaro, 1965. 





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