World  Sacred  Scriptures



The wisdom of The Philokalia

Onelittleangel > Christianity > Orthodoxy > The Philokalia
18  quote(s)  | Page 1 / 1





W hen the intellect has been perfected, it unites wholly with God and is illumined by divine light, and the most hidden mysteries are revealed to it. Then it truly learns where wisdom and power lie… While it is still fighting against the passions it cannot as yet enjoy these things… But once the battle is over and it is found worthy of spiritual gifts, then it becomes wholly luminous, powerfully energized by grace and rooted in the contemplation of spiritual realities. A person in whom this happens is not attached to the things of this world but has passed from death to life.




Christianity / Orthodoxy 3409 | 
Philokalia (Vol. 2), p. 355 







T he person who listens to Christ fills himself with light; and if he imitates Christ, he reclaims himself.




Christianity / Orthodoxy 3408 | 
St. Thalassios, in On Love, Self-control and Life in accordance with the Intellect: ("Philokalia (Vol. 2)", p. 321) 







T he Lord fills His teachers with grace according to the quality and longing of those who listen.




Christianity / Orthodoxy 3402 | 
St. John Cassian in On the Holy Fathers of Sketis: ("Philokalia (Vol. 1)", p. 98) 







W hen Christ Himself spoke to Paul and called him, He could have opened his eyes at once and made known to him the way of perfection; instead He sent him to Ananias and told him to learn from him the way of truth, saying: Arise and go into the city, and there you will be told what you must do (Acts 9:6). In this manner He teaches us to be guided by those who are advanced on the way, so that the vision rightly given to Paul should not be wrongly interpreted; otherwise it might lead later generations presumptuously to suppose that each individual must be initiated into the truth directly by God, as Paul was, and not by the fathers…




Christianity / Orthodoxy 3401 | 
St. John Cassian in On the Holy Fathers of Sketis: ("Philokalia (Vol. 1)", p. 107) 







A ll men are made in God's image; but to be in His likeness is granted only to those who through great love have brought their own freedom into subjection to God. For only when we do not belong to ourselves do we become like Him who through love has reconciled us to Himself. No one achieves this unless he persuades his soul not to be distracted by the false glitter of this life.




Christianity / Orthodoxy 3400 | 
St. Diadochos of Photiki in On Spiritual Knowledge: ("Philokalia (Vol. 1)", p. 253, text 4) 







A brother named John came from the coast to Father Philimon and, clasping his feet, said to him: "What shall I do to be saved? For my intellect vacillates to and fro and strays after all the wrong things." After a pause, the father replied: "This is one of the outer passions and it stays with you because you still have not acquired a perfect longing for God. The warmth of this longing and of the knowledge of God has not yet come to you." The brother said to him: "What shall I do, father?" Abba Philimon replied: "Meditate inwardly for a while, deep in your heart; for this can cleanse your intellect of these things." The brother, not understanding what was said, asked the Elder: "What is inward meditation, father?" The Elder replied: "Keep watch in your heart; and with watchfulness say in your mind with awe and trembling: Lord Jesus Christ, have mercy upon me. For this is the advice which the blessed Diadochos gave to beginners."




Christianity / Orthodoxy 3399 | 
("Philokalia (Vol. 2)", p. 347) 







F asts and vigils, the study of Scripture, renouncing possessions and everything worldly are not in themselves perfection, as we have said; they are its tools. For perfection is not to be found in them; it is acquired through them. It is useless, therefore, to boast of our fasting, vigils, poverty, and reading of Scripture when we have not achieved the love of God and our fellow men. Whoever has achieved love has God within himself and his intellect is always with God.




Christianity / Orthodoxy 3391 | 
St. John Cassian quoting Abba Moses in On the Holy Fathers of Sketis: ("Philokalia (Vol. 1)", p. 96) 







T here is no gainsaying what the fathers have so well affirmed, that a man does not find rest except by acquiring inwardly the thought that God and he alone exist; and so he does not let his intellect wander at all towards anything whatsoever, but longs only for Him, cleaving to Him alone. Such a man will find true rest and freedom from the tyranny of the passions. My soul, as David says, is bound to Thee; Thy right hand has upheld me (Ps. 63:8. LXX).




Christianity / Orthodoxy 3389 | 
St. Theodoros the Great Ascetic in A Century of Spiritual Texts: ("Philokalia (Vol. 2)", p. ?) 







F or the good is not good if it is not rightly done. It is really good only if it is not done with the purpose of receiving some reward: as, for instance, the search for popularity or glory may be rewarded by fame, or by excessive gain, or by something else that is wrong. God is not interested in what happens to turn out to be good or in what appears to be good. He is interested in the purpose for which a thing is done.




Christianity / Orthodoxy 3376 | 
St. John of Damaskos in On the Virtues and Vices: ("Philokalia (Vol. 2)", pp. 339-340) 







F or desire is drawn towards three things: the pleasure of the flesh, vain self-glory, and the acquisition of material wealth. As a result of this senseless appetite it scorns God and His commandments, and forgets His generosity; it turns like a savage beast against its neighbour; it plunges the intelligence into darkness and prevents it from looking towards the truth. He who has acquired a spiritual understanding of this truth will share, even here on earth, in the kingdom of heaven and will live a blessed life in expectation of the blessedness that awaits those who love God.




Christianity / Orthodoxy 3374 | 
St. John of Damaskos in On the Virtues and the Vices: ("The Philokalia (Vol. 2)", p. 339) 







N atural knowledge is that which the soul can acquire through the use of its natural faculties and powers when investigating creation and the cause of creation -- in so far, of course, as this is possible for a soul bound to matter… Supranatural knowledge, on the other hand, is that which enters the intellect in a manner transcending its own means and power; that is to say, the intelligible objects that constitute such knowledge surpass the capacity of an intellect joined to a body, so that a knowledge of them pertains naturally only to an intellect which is free from the body. Such knowledge is infused by God alone when He finds an intellect purified of all material attachment and inspired by divine love.




Christianity / Orthodoxy 3372 | 
St. Theodoros, the Great Ascetic in Theoretikon: ("Philokalia (Vol. 2)", pp. 39-40) 







P rayer is the laying aside of thoughts.




Christianity / Orthodoxy 3357 | 
Evagrios Ponticus, "On Prayer 61," in the Philokalia 







I f your intellect is freed from all hope in things visible, this is a sign that sin has died in you. If your intellect is freed, the breach between it and God is eliminated.




Christianity / Orthodoxy 3356 | 
Abba Isaiah the Solitary: "On Guarding the Intellect", taken from the Philokalia 







S hut all the gates of your soul, that is the senses, so as to not be lured astay. When the intellect sees that it is not dominated by anything, it prepares itself for immortality, gathering its senses together and forming them into one body.




Christianity / Orthodoxy 3355 | 
Abba Isaiah the Solitary: "On Guarding the Intellect", taken from the Philokalia 







O ne of perfect prayer is he who, withdrawing from all mankind, is united with all mankind.
One of perfect prayer is he who regards himself as existing with all people and sees himself in every person.





Christianity / Orthodoxy 3079 | 
Kadloubovsky, E., and Palmer G. E. H., trans. Early Fathers from the Philokalia. London: Faber and Faber Limited, 1954, pp. 109,157-158, 161, 166,170 







T he wise Solomon says in the Proverbs, "They that have no guidance fall like leaves; but in much counsel there is safety." So you see what the Holy Scriptures teach us? They enjoin us not to rely on ourselves, not to regard ourselves as knowing all, not to believe that we can control ourselves, for we need help, and are in need of those who would counsel us according to God. No men are more unfortunate or nearer perdition than those who have no teachers on the way of God.
For what does it mean that where no guidance is, the people fall like leaves? A leaf is at first green, flourishing, beautiful., then it gradually withers, falls, and is finally trampled underfoot. So it is with a man who has no guide: at first he is always zealous in fasting, vigil, silence, obedience, and other virtues; then his zeal, little by little, cools down and, having no one to instruct, support, and fire him up with zeal, he insensibly withers, falls, and finally becomes a slave of the enemies, who do with him what they will.





Christianity / Orthodoxy 3078 | 
Kadloubovsky, E., and Palmer G. E. H., trans. Early Fathers from the Philokalia. London: Faber and Faber Limited, 1954, pp. 109,157-158, 161, 166,170 







A soul pure in God is God.




Christianity / Orthodoxy 3077 | 
Kadloubovsky, E., and Palmer G. E. H., trans. Early Fathers from the Philokalia. London: Faber and Faber Limited, 1954, pp. 109,157-158, 161, 166,170 







I f we were willing to make even small efforts, we would not suffer either much distress or difficulty. For if a man urges himself to make efforts, then, as he continues them, he gradually makes progress and later practices virtues with tranquillity; for God, seeing him urge himself, sends him help. So let us urge ourselves, for, although we have not reached perfection, if we make efforts, through efforts we shall receive help, and with this help shall acquire all kinds of virtues. Therefore one of the fathers said, "Give blood and receive spirit," that is, strive earnestly and you will become perfect.




Christianity / Orthodoxy 3076 | 
Kadloubovsky, E., and Palmer G. E. H., trans. Early Fathers from the Philokalia. London: Faber and Faber Limited, 1954, pp. 109,157-158, 161, 166,170 





Page:  1



On other page(s):  History and calligraphy of The Philokalia




Share this Webpage on social media








Home | ♥ Our Project ♥ ⇄ ♥ Your project ♥