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The wisdom of The Law of Manu

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B y deep meditation let him recognise the subtile nature of the supreme Soul, and its presence in all organisms, both the highest and the lowest.




Hinduism 8461 | 
The Law of Manu, Tr. George Buhler, 6.65 







C ontentment, forgiveness, self-control, abstention from unrighteously appropriating anything, (obedience to the rules of) purification, coercion of the organs, wisdom, knowledge (of the supreme Soul), truthfulness, and abstention from anger, (form) the tenfold law.




Hinduism 8460 | 
The Law of Manu, Tr. George Buhler, 1886, 6.92 







W hen by the disposition (of his heart) he becomes indifferent to all objects, he obtains eternal happiness both in this world and after death.




Hinduism 8459 | 
The Law of Manu, Tr. George Buhler, 6.80 







L et him be always industrious in privately reciting the Veda; let him be patient of hardships, friendly (towards all), of collected mind, ever liberal and never a receiver of gifts, and compassionate towards all living creatures.




Hinduism 8458 | 
The Law of Manu, Tr. George Buhler, 6.8 







H e who possesses the true insight (into the nature of the world), is not fettered by his deeds; but he who is destitute of that insight, is drawn into the circle of births and deaths.




Hinduism 8457 | 
The Law of Manu, Tr. George Buhler, 6.74 







H e who possesses the true insight (into the nature of the world), is not fettered by his deeds; but he who is destitute of that insight, is drawn into the circle of births and deaths.




Hinduism 8456 | 
The Law of Manu, Tr. George Buhler, 6.74 







L et him recognise by the practice of meditation the progress of the individual soul through beings of various kinds, (a progress) hard to understand for unregenerate men.




Hinduism 8455 | 
The Law of Manu, Tr. George Buhler, 6.73 







O n the infliction of pain on embodied (spirits), which is caused by demerit, and the gain of eternal bliss, which is caused by the attainment of their highest aim, (gained through) spiritual merit.




Hinduism 8454 | 
The Law of Manu, Tr. George Buhler, 6.64 







O n the separation from their dear ones, on their union with hated men, on their being overpowered by age and being tormented with diseases,




Hinduism 8453 | 
The Law of Manu, Tr. George Buhler, 6.62 







B y the restraint of his senses, by the destruction of love and hatred, and by the abstention from injuring the creatures, he becomes fit for immortality.




Hinduism 8452 | 
The Law of Manu, Tr. George Buhler, 6.60 







B y eating little, and by standing and sitting in solitude, let him restrain his senses, if they are attracted by sensual objects.




Hinduism 8451 | 
The Law of Manu, Tr. George Buhler, 6.59 







L et him disdain all (food) obtained in consequence of humble salutations, (for) even an ascetic who has attained final liberation, is bound (with the fetters of the Samsara) by accepting (food given) in consequence of humble salutations.




Hinduism 8450 | 
The Law of Manu, Tr. George Buhler, 6.58 







N either by (explaining) prodigies and omens, nor by skill in astrology and palmistry, nor by giving advice and by the exposition (of the Sastras), let him ever seek to obtain alms.




Hinduism 8449 | 
The Law of Manu, Tr. George Buhler, 6.50 







D elighting in what refers to the Soul, sitting (in the postures prescribed by the Yoga), independent (of external help), entirely abstaining from sensual enjoyments, with himself for his only companion, he shall live in this world, desiring the bliss (of final liberation).




Hinduism 8448 | 
The Law of Manu, Tr. George Buhler, 6.49 







L et him patiently bear hard words, let him not insult anybody, and let him not become anybody’s enemy for the sake of this (perishable) body.




Hinduism 8447 | 
The Law of Manu, Tr. George Buhler, 6.47 







L et him put down his foot purified by his sight, let him drink water purified by (straining with) a cloth, let him utter speech purified by truth, let him keep his heart pure.




Hinduism 8446 | 
The Law of Manu, Tr. George Buhler, 6.46 







L et him not desire to die, let him not desire to live; let him wait for (his appointed) time, as a servant (waits) for the payment of his wages.




Hinduism 8445 | 
The Law of Manu, Tr. George Buhler, 6.45 







S he must always be cheerful, clever in (the management of her) household affairs, careful in cleaning her utensils, and economical in expenditure.




Hinduism 8444 | 
The Law of Manu, Tr. George Buhler, 5.150 







H e who is dishonest with respect to speech is dishonest in everything.




Hinduism 8443 | 
The Law of Manu, Tr. George Buhler, 4.256 







H e who is persevering, gentle (and) patient, shuns the company of men of cruel conduct, and does no injury (to living creatures), gains, if he constantly lives in that manner, by controlling his organs and by liberality, heavenly bliss.




Hinduism 8442 | 
The Law of Manu, Tr. George Buhler, 4.246 







S ingle is each being born; single it dies; single it enjoys (the reward of its) virtue; single (it suffers the punishment of its) sin.




Hinduism 8441 | 
The Law of Manu, Tr. George Buhler, 4.240 







( A man) who, ever covetous, displays the flag of virtue, (who is) a hypocrite, a deceiver of the people, intent on doing injury, (and) a detractor (from the merits) of all men, . . . who with downcast look, of a cruel disposition, is solely intent on attaining his own ends, dishonest and falsely gentle, . . . fall[s] in consequence of that wicked mode of acting into (the hell called) Andhatamisra.




Hinduism 8440 | 
The Law of Manu, Tr. George Buhler, 4.195-197 







E verything that depends on oneself (gives) pleasure .




Hinduism 8439 | 
The Law of Manu, Tr. George Buhler, 4.160 







H e who, recollecting his former existences, again recites the Veda, gains endless bliss by the continual study of the Veda.




Hinduism 8438 | 
The Law of Manu, Tr. George Buhler, 4.149 







L et him eagerly follow the (customs which are) auspicious and the rule of good conduct, be careful of purity, and control all his organs, let him mutter (prayers) and, untired, daily offer oblations in the fire.




Hinduism 8437 | 
The Law of Manu, Tr. George Buhler, 4.145 







L et him not insult those who have redundant limbs or are deficient in limbs, nor those destitute of knowledge, nor very aged men, nor those who have no beauty or wealth, nor those who are of low birth.




Hinduism 8436 | 
The Law of Manu, Tr. George Buhler, 4.141 







H e who desires happiness must strive after a perfectly contented disposition and control himself; for happiness has contentment for its root, the root of unhappiness is the contrary (disposition).




Hinduism 8435 | 
The Law of Manu, Tr. George Buhler, 4.12 







W here the husband is pleased with his wife and the wife with her husband, happiness will assuredly be lasting.




Hinduism 8434 | 
The Law of Manu, Tr. George Buhler, 3.60 







T hat trouble (and pain) which the parents undergo on (their) birth of their children, cannot be compensated even in a hundred years.




Hinduism 8433 | 
The Law of Manu, Tr. George Buhler, 2.227 







W ay must be made for a man in a carriage, for one who is above ninety years old, for one diseased, for the carrier of a burden, for a woman, for a Snataka, for the king, and for a bridegroom.




Hinduism 8432 | 
The Law of Manu, Tr. George Buhler, 2.138 







( Even forgetful) students of the (sacred) books are more distinguished than the ignorant, those who remember them surpass the (forgetful) students, those who possess a knowledge (of the meaning) are more distinguished than those who (only) remember (the words), men who follow (the teaching of the texts) surpass those who (merely) know (their meaning).




Hinduism 8431 | 
The Law of Manu, Tr. George Buhler, 12.103 







I n whatever order (a man) who knows the true meaning of the Veda-science may dwell, he becomes even while abiding in this world, fit for the union with Brahman.




Hinduism 8430 | 
The Law of Manu, Tr. George Buhler, 1886, 12.102 







I f the punishment does not fall on the offender himself, it falls on his
sons; if not on the sons, on his grandsons.





Hinduism 4319 | 
Laws of Manu 4.173 







L eaving the dead body on the ground like a log of wood or a clod of earth, the relatives depart with averted faces; but spiritual merit follows the soul.

Let him therefore always slowly accumulate spiritual merit, in order that it may be his companion after death; for without merit as his companion he will traverse a gloom difficult to traverse.

That companion speedily conducts the man who is devoted to duty and effaces his sins by austerities, to the next world, radiant and clothed with an ethereal body.





Hinduism 4237 | 
Laws of Manu 4.241-43 







A ction, which springs from the mind, from speech, and from the body, produces either good or evil results; by action are caused the conditions of men, the highest, the middling, and the lowest.

A man obtains the result of a good or evil mental act in his mind; that of a verbal act in his speech; that of a bodily act in his body.

In consequence of sinful acts committed with his body, a man becomes in the next birth an inanimate thing; in consequence of sins committed by speech, he becomes a bird or a beast; in consequence of mental sins he is reborn in a low caste.





Hinduism 4170 | 
Laws of Manu 12.3,8,9 







U nrighteousness, practiced in this world, does not at once produce its fruit; but, like a cow, advancing slowly, it cuts off the roots of him who committed it.




Hinduism 4166 | 
Laws of Manu 4.172 







B y deep meditations, let him recognize the subtle nature of the supreme Soul (1), and it presence in all organisms, both the highest and the lowest.




Hinduism 3963 | 
VI, 65, Translation by G. Buhler in Sacred Books of the East, xxv (Oxford, 1886), pp. 204-10 
(1) Brahman







D elighting in what refers to the Soul, (1) sitting (in the postures prescribed by the Yoga), independent (of external help), entirely abstaining from sensual enjoyments, with himself for his only companion, he shall live in this world, desiring the bliss (of final liberation). . . .

By the restraint of his senses, by the destruction of love, (2) and hatred, and by the abstention from injuring the creatures, (3) he becomes fit for immortality.





Hinduism 3962 | 
VI, 49,60, Translation by G. Buhler in Sacred Books of the East, xxv (Oxford, 1886), pp. 204-10 
1 Atman. 2 Or, affection, passion (raga). 3 Ahimsa, non-injury







L et him reflect on the transmigrations of men, caused by their sinful deeds, on their falling into hell, and on the torments in the world of Yama,

On the separation from their dear ones, on their union with hated men, on their being overpowered by age and being tormented with diseases,

On the departure of the individual soul from this body and its new birth in (another) womb, and on its wanderings through ten thousand millions of existences,





Hinduism 3961 | 
VI, 61-63, Translation by G. Buhler in Sacred Books of the East, xxv (Oxford, 1886), pp. 204-10 







H e who after passing from order to order, after offering sacrifices and subduing his senses, becomes, tired with (giving) alms and offerings of food, an ascetic, gains bliss after death. [...]

Departing from his house fully provided with the means of purification (Pavitra), (1) let him wander about absolutely silent, and caring nothing for enjoyments that may be offered (to him).

Let him always wander alone, without any companion, in order to attain (final liberation), fully understanding that the solitary (man, who) neither forsakes nor is forsaken, gains his end.

He shall neither possess a fire, nor a dwelling, he may go to a village for his food, (he shall be) indifferent to everything, firm of purpose, mediating (and) concentrating his mind on Brahman. . . .[…]





Hinduism 3960 | 
VI, 33,34,41-43, Translation by G. Buhler in Sacred Books of the East, xxv (Oxford, 1886), pp. 204-10 
1 Construed as either his capacities after having completed three states of life, or his 'equipment' such as staff and water-pot.







L et him not desire to die, let him not desire to live; let him wait for (his appointed) time, as a servant (waits) for the payment of his wages.




Hinduism 3959 | 
VI, 45, Translation by G. Buhler in Sacred Books of the East, xxv (Oxford, 1886), pp. 204-10 







B ut having thus passed the third part of (a man's natural term of) life in the forest, he may live as an ascetic during the fourth part of his existence, after abandoning all attachments to worldly objects. (1)




Hinduism 3958 | 
VI, 33, Translation by G. Buhler in Sacred Books of the East, xxv (Oxford, 1886), pp. 204-10 
(1) Reference here is to the ideal four stages (ashramas) of the Brahman's life: student (brahmacarin), householder (grihastha), hermit or forest-dweller (vanaprastha), and finally, ascetic or mendicant (yati, bhikshu, parivrajaka, samnyasin).







T his (universe) existed in the shape of Darkness, (1) unperceived, destitute of distinctive marks, unattainable by reasoning, unknowable, wholly immersed, as it were, in deep sleep.

Then the divine Self-existent (2) indiscernible, (but) making (all) this, the great elements and the rest, discernible, appeared with irresistible (creative) power, dispelling the darkness.

He who can be perceived by the internal organ (3) (alone), who is subtle, indiscernible, and eternal, who contains all created beings and is inconceivable, shone forth of his own (will). (4)

He, desiring to produce beings of many kinds from his own body, first with a thought created (5) the waters, and placed [his] seed in them.

That (seed) became a golden egg, (6) in brilliancy equal to the sun;
in that (egg) he himself was born as Brahmin, the progenitor of the whole world.

The waters were called naras, (for) the waters are, indeed, the offspring of Nara; as they were his (7) first residence (ayana), he thence is named Narayana . (8)

From that (first) cause, which is indiscernible, eternal, and both real and unreal, (9) was produced that male (Purusha), (10) who is famed in this world (under the appellation of) Brahmin.

The divine one resided in that egg during a whole year, (11) then he himself by his thought (12) (alone) divided it into two halves;

And out of those two halves he formed heaven and earth, between them the middle sphere, the eight points of the horizon, and the eternal abode of the waters.

From himself (atmanas) he also drew forth the mind, (13) which is both real and unreal, likewise from the mind egoism, (14) which possesses the function of self-consciousness (and is) lordly:

Moreover, the great one, (15) the soul, (16) and all products affected by the three qualities, (17) and, in their order, the five organs which perceive the objects of sensation. (18)

But, joining minute particles even of those six, (19) which possess measureless power, with particles of himself he created all beings.





Hinduism 3932 | 
1, 5-16, Translation by G. buhler, in Sacred Books of the East, XXV (Oxford,1886), PP. 2-8 
1 Tamas, a darkness both physical and mental. The Samkhya system finds considerable significance in this stanza: tamas, one of the three twisted strands (gunas) of cosmic substance, represents inertia. 2 Svayambhu, an epithet of Brahmin (masculine), who is the impersonal Absolute (Brahman neuter) personified as manifest god. 3 Atindriya, literally that spirit or mind 'beyond the senses.' 4 i.e., became self-manifest. 5 Or, released. 6 As 'the shape of Darkness' (vs. I) and the environmental 'waters' recall the Rig Vedic creation hymn X, 120, so does this golden 'egg' (anda) and its seed (bija) recall the hiranyagarbha of Rig Veda, X, 121. 7 Brahmin's. 8 An example of popular etymology, nara being primal man or eternal spirit. 9 Literally, having existence (sat) and non-existence (asat) as its nature. 10 See the Purushasukta, Rig Veda, X .90 11 Early commentators disagreed, some saying that the 'year' was a 'year of Brahmin,' others maintaining that a human year is meant, as in the similar version of this selection, Shatapatha- bramana, XI, I, 6, 1 ff. 12 Meditation (dhyana). 13 Manas, mind or intelligence, as distinct from spirit (atman). 14 Ahamkara, literally 'the making of "I" (aham)'; the principle of individuation. 15 Mahat, the 'great'; in Samkhya also called buddhi, consciousness. 16 Atman. 17 Gunas. 18 Tanmatras, subtle elements. 19 Again, the Indian commentators are at variance in their interpretations of these last three lines. Probably 'those six' are classes of tattvas (elements) mentioned in the preceding two verses, in the order: manas, ahamkara, mahat, atman, tattvas affected by the gunas, tanmatras. 'It is interesting to compare the Samkya evolutes of prakriti. Here twenty-five tattvas, a rearrangement of 'those six' above, evolve with greater systematization: (1) purusha; and from prakriti, (2) mahat, (3) ahamkara, (4) manas, (5) five sense organs and five motor organs, (6) five subtle elements (tanmatras) and five gross elements (mahabhutas). --------------------------------------------------------------------------------





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