World  Sacred  Scriptures



The wisdom of The Surangama Sutra

Onelittleangel > Buddhism > The Surangama Sutra
53  quote(s)  | Page 1 / 2





T he Buddha asks about perfect penetration. I would select none other than gathering in the six sense faculties through continuous pure mindfulness of the Buddha to obtain Samadhi. That is the foremost means.




Buddhism 8079 | 
Book 5, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







O n the causal ground, I78used mindfulness of the Buddha to be patient with the non-arising of both beings and dharmas. Now in this world I gather in all those who are mindful of the Buddha, and I bring them back to the Pure Land.




Buddhism 8078 | 
Book 5, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 
77 ????????????????? 78 “I” here and in the succeeding passage refers to Mahasthamaprapta Bodhisattva.







I f living beings remember the Buddha and are mindful of the Buddha, they will certainly see the Buddha now and in the future. Being close to the Buddha, even without the aid of expedients, their hearts will open of themselves.




Buddhism 8063 | 
Book 5, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







T he Tathagatas of the ten directions are tenderly mindful of living beings just like a mother remembering her son. But if the son runs away, of what use is the mother’s concern? However, if the son remembers his mother in the same way that the mother remembers her son, then in life after life mother and son will never be far apart.




Buddhism 8033 | 
Book 5, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







T heir numberless response-bodies took beings across and liberated them, extricating and rescuing those of the future so they could transcend the bonds of all mundane defilements.




Buddhism 8022 | 
Book 1, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







I f you can influence phenomena, then you are the same as the Tathagata. With body and mind perfect and bright, you are your own unmoving Way-place. The tip of a single fine hair can completely contain the lands of the ten directions.




Buddhism 8017 | 
Book 2, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







W ith arising and ceasing gone, tranquility was revealed. Suddenly I 61 transcended the worldly and transcendental, and a perfect brightness prevailed throughout the ten directions.




Buddhism 8013 | 
Book 6, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







S o it is that when the seven destinies of hell-dwellers, hungry ghosts, animals, people, spiritual immortals, gods, and asuras are investigated in detail, they are all found to be murky and embroiled in conditioned existence. Their births come from false thoughts. Their subsequent karma comes from false thoughts.




Buddhism 8007 | 
Book 9, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







H aving lost sight of that original brightness, although beings use it to the end of their days, they are unaware of it, and unintentionally enter the various destinies.




Buddhism 8006 | 
Book 1, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







T he root of beginningless birth and death, which is the mind that seizes upon conditions and that you and all living beings now make use of, taking it to be your own nature.




Buddhism 8005 | 
Book 1, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







D o not follow the knowing and seeing influenced by objects before you. True understanding does not follow from the sense organs. Yet lodged at the organs is the potential to discover mutual functioning of the six organs.




Buddhism 7996 | 
Book 4, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







O n the tip of a single hair appear the lands of the Jewelled Kings. Sitting in a mote of dust, I turn the great Dharma wheel.




Buddhism 7993 | 
Book 4, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







T he reason for this lies in the delusion of beings who have turned their backs on enlightenment and joined with the defiling dust. Thus, the wearisome defilements come into being and mundane phenomena exist.




Buddhism 7991 | 
Book 4, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







T he union and mixture of various causes and conditions account for their illusory and false existence, and the separation and dispersion of the causes and conditions result in their illusory and false extinction.




Buddhism 7990 | 
Book 2, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







A ll beings come into being because of false interaction. Their bodies go through changes and they are caught in the temporal and spatial combinations of this world.




Buddhism 7989 | 
Book 4, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







C onfusion about falseness brings about emptiness. Relying on emptiness, worlds coming into being. Thoughts settle, forming countries. Consciousness becomes beings.




Buddhism 7988 | 
Book 6, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







A ll countries that have outflows and all living beings are the enlightened bright wonderful mind without outflows. Seeing, hearing, awareness, and knowing are an illusory falseness brought about by the disease and its conditions.




Buddhism 7984 | 
Book 2, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







A ll conditions that bring about forms and the mind as well as dharmas pertaining to the mind and all the conditioned dharmas are manifestations of the mind only. Your bodies and your minds all appear within the wonder of the bright, true, essential, magnificent mind.




Buddhism 7983 | 
Book 2, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







A ll dharmas that arise are only manifestations of the mind. All causes and effects, the worlds as many as atoms of universe, take on substance because of the heart.




Buddhism 7982 | 
Book 1, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







C onsider the nature of earth: its coarsest aspect is the earth itself; its subtlest aspect is a mote of dust, which at its smallest would be a particle of dust bordering on emptiness. If one divided one of those particles of dust that is barely form to begin with into seven parts and then split one of those parts, emptiness itself would be arrived at.




Buddhism 7981 | 
Book 3, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







A ll the defiling objects that appear, all the illusory, ephemeral phenomena, spring up in the very spot where they also come to an end.




Buddhism 7980 | 
Book 2, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







P ut an end to defiling dust, and unite with enlightenment, so that true suchness, the wonderful enlightened bright nature, comes into being.




Buddhism 7978 | 
Book 4, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







F rom such confused causes, the cause of confusion perpetuates itself. When one realizes that confusion has no cause , the falseness becomes baseless. Since it never arose, why would you hope for its end?




Buddhism 7977 | 
Book 4, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







C onsider the person who, because of cataracts, saw flowers in space. Once the cataracts were removed, the ?owers in space disappeared.




Buddhism 7976 | 
Book 4, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







C onfusion is groundless and ultimately empty in nature. In the past, there basically was no confusion. It merely seemed as if there were confusion and enlightenment. When the delusion about confusion and enlightenment is ended, enlightenment will not give rise to confusion.




Buddhism 7975 | 
Book 4, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







A t first there was one essential brightness, which split into a sixfold combination. If but one part ceases and returns, all six functions will stop as well.




Buddhism 7974 | 
Book 6, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







T his is similar to a person pointing his finger at the moon to show it to someone else. Guided by the finger, the other person should see the moon. If he looks at the finger instead and mistakes it for the moon, he loses not only the moon but the finger also.




Buddhism 7972 | 
Book 2, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







T herefore, creating knowledge within enlightened perception is fundamental ignorance. To be devoid of perception within enlightened perception is the non out?ow true purity of Nirvana.




Buddhism 7970 | 
Book 5, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







B ased on wonderful understanding that neither ceases to be nor comes into being, I unite with the Treasury of the Tathagata. Thus the Treasury of the Tathagata is the unique and wonderful enlightened brightness which completely illumines the Dharma Realm. That is why, within it, the one is limitless; the limitless is one. In the small appears the great; in the great appears the small.




Buddhism 7969 | 
Book 4, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







T he truly wonderful enlightened brightness is the same way. You recognize space , and space appears. Recognizing earth, water, fire, and wind, each will appear. If all are recognized, all will appear.




Buddhism 7968 | 
Book 4, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







A wareness arises because of defiling objects. Phenomena exist because of the sense organs. The phenomena and the perception are both devoid of their own natures. They support each other like intertwining reeds.




Buddhism 7967 | 
Book 5, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







E ach person regarded his physical body as being like a particle of dust blown about in the emptiness of the ten directions; sometimes visible, sometimes not, or as being like a single bubble ?oating on the clear, vast sea, appearing from nowhere and disappearing into oblivion.




Buddhism 7966 | 
Book 4, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







A ll mundane phenomena became the wonderfully bright primal mind of Bodhi. The essence of the mind became completely pervasive, containing the ten directions.




Buddhism 7963 | 
Book 4, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







Y ou should know that from beginningless time all beings are continually born and continually die, simply because they do not know the everlasting true mind with its pure nature and bright substance. Instead they engage in false thinking. These thoughts are not true, and so they lead to further transmigration.




Buddhism 7961 | 
Book 1, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







I f within the true and eternal nature one seeks coming and going, confusion and enlightenment, or birth and death, one will never find them.




Buddhism 7960 | 
Book 2, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







O ne who obtains Bodhi is like a person who awakens to tell of the events in a dream; since his mind will remain awake and clear, why would he want to hold onto the things in a dream?




Buddhism 7957 | 
Book 4, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







I f the three karmas are not all involved, and there is perhaps just one act of killing and one of stealing, then the person must enter the Thirty-six Hells.




Buddhism 7942 | 
Book 8, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







I f the three karmas of body, mouth50, and mind commit acts of killing, stealing, and lust, the person will enter the Eighteen Hells.




Buddhism 7941 | 
Book 8, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 
50 Words







Y ou love my mind; I adore your good looks. Due to such causes and conditions we pass through hundreds of thousands of eons in sustained mutual entanglement.




Buddhism 7934 | 
Book 4, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







Y ou owe me a life; I48 must repay my debt to you. Due to such causes and conditions we pass through hundreds of thousands of eons in sustained cycle of birth and death.




Buddhism 7933 | 
Book 4, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 
47 ???????????????
48 “I” here and in the succeeding passage refers to any ordinary person.







I f while repaying his past debts46 by undergoing rebirth as an animal, such a living being pays back more than he owed, he will then be reborn as a human to rectify the excess.




Buddhism 7932 | 
Book 8, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 
46 His past karmic debts







S uppose a person eats a sheep. The sheep dies and becomes a person; the person dies and becomes a sheep. The same applies in all rebirths among the ten categories. Through death after death and birth after birth, they eat each other.




Buddhism 7931 | 
Book 4, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







K illing, stealing, and lust are the basic roots. From such causes and conditions comes the continuity of karma and retribution.




Buddhism 7920 | 
Book 4, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







T hese living beings, who do not recognize the fundamental mind, all undergo rebirth for limitless kalpas. They do not attain true purity, because they keep getting involved in killing, stealing, and lust, or because they counter them and are born according to their not killing, not stealing, and lack of lust. If these three karmas are present in them, they are born among the troops of ghosts. If they are free of these three karmas, they are born in the destiny of gods.




Buddhism 7919 | 
Book 9, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







A ccordingly, extract one organ, free it from adhesion, and subdue it at its inner core. Once subdued, it will return to primal truth and radiate its innate brilliance. When that brilliance shines forth, the remaining five adhesions will b e f re e d to accomplish total liberation.




Buddhism 7890 | 
Book 4, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







C ollecting one’s thoughts constitutes the precepts; from the precepts comes Samadhi; and from Samadhi arises wisdom. These are called the Three Non-Outflow Studies34.




Buddhism 7838 | 
Book 6, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 
34 Threefold Learning.







W hen you teach people of the world to cultivate Samadhi, they must first of all cut off the mind of sexual desire. This is the first clear and decisive instruction on purity given by the Tathagatas, the Buddhas of the past, the Bhagavans.




Buddhism 7803 | 
Book 6, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







I t is because beings are impeded by transitory defilements and afflictions that they do not realize Bodhi31 or become Arhats.




Buddhism 7802 | 
Book 1, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 
31 Perfect Enlightenment.







T he Tathagatas20 of the ten directions escaped birth and death because their minds were straightforward. Since their minds and words were consistently that way, from the beginning, through the intermediate stages to the end, they were never in the least evasive.




Buddhism 7749 | 
Book 1, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 
20 Tathagata: A title of the Buddha, which means “one who has thus come or gone”. (??:??????,??:?????????)







G reat hero with great strength, great kindness, and compassion, please further search out and dispel my subtlest doubts, cause me18 to quickly attain the supreme enlightenment, and sit in Way-places in worlds of the ten directions.




Buddhism 7745 | 
Book 3, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 
17 ????????????????????????
18 “Me” here refers to Venerable Ananda, who was endowed with the most retentive memory and was known as the Guardian of the Dharma.





Page:  1 |2





Share this Webpage on social media








Home | ♥ Our Project ♥ ⇄ ♥ Your project ♥