World  Spiritual  Heritage
Milarepa



Spiritual quotes of Milarepa
Onelittleangel > Buddhism > Mahayana > Milarepa
13  quote(s)  | Page 1 / 1
T+ A- A A+



V eiled by ignorance,
The minds of man and Buddha
Appear to be different;
Yet in the realm of Mind Essence
They are both of one taste.
Sometimes they will meet each other
In the great Dharmadhatu.













M aintain the state of undistractedness, and distractions will fly away. Dwell alone, and you shall find the Friend. Take the lowest place, and you shall reach the highest. Hasten slowly, and you shall soon arrive. Renounce all worldly goals, and you shall reach the highest Goal. If you follow this unfrequented path, you will find the shortest way. If you realize Sunyata (the absolute Emptiness), compassion will arise within your hearts; and when you lose all differentiation between yourself and others, then you will be fit to serve others.




3749 |  Buddhism, Mahayana
Source : Evans-Wentz, 1971; pp. 259, 261, 262, 270, 271  








I t is difficult to meet success in the effort to insure one's own spiritual welfare, even without seeking to benefit others. If you seek another's spiritual welfare before attaining your own, it would be like a helplessly drowning man trying to save another man in the same predicament. Therefore, one should not be too anxious and hasty in setting out to save others before one has, oneself, realized Truth in Its fullness. That would be like the blind leading the blind. As long as the sky endures, there will be no dearth of sentient beings for you to serve, and your opportunity for such service will come. Till it does, I exhort each one of you to keep but one resolve: namely, to attain Buddhahood for the benefit of all living creatures.




3748 |  Buddhism, Mahayana
Source : Evans-Wentz, 1971; pp. 259, 261, 262, 270, 271  








L ife is short, and the time of death is uncertain; so apply yourselves to meditation. Avoid doing evil, and acquire merit, to the best of your ability, even at the cost of life itself. In short, act so that you will have no cause to be ashamed of yourselves; and hold fast to this rule.




3747 |  Buddhism, Mahayana
Source : Evans-Wentz, 1971; pp. 259, 261, 262, 270, 271  








A s regards the method of acquiring practical spiritual knowledge, if you find a certain practice increases your evil passions and tends you toward selfishness, abandon it, though it may appear to others virtuous. And if any course of action tends to counteract your evil passions, and to benefit sentient beings, know that to be the true and holy path, and continue it, even though it should appear to others to be sinful.




3746 |  Buddhism, Mahayana
Source : Evans-Wentz, 1971; pp. 259, 261, 262, 270, 271  








A ll worldly pursuits have but one unavoidable and inevitable end, which is sorrow; acquisitions end in dispersion; buildings in destruction; meetings in separation; births in death. Knowing this, one should, from the very first, renounce acquisitions and storing-up, and building, and meeting; and, faithful to the commands of an eminent Guru, set about realizing the Truth. That alone is the best of religious observances.




3745 |  Buddhism, Mahayana
Source : Evans-Wentz, 1971; pp. 259, 261, 262, 270, 271  








A ccustomed, as I've been, to contemplating both nirvana and samsara as inherent in myself,
I have forgotten to think of hope and fear.





3744 |  Buddhism, Mahayana
Source : Evans-Wentz, 1971;pp 245-247  








M ay I be far removed from contending creeds and dogmas.
Ever since my Lord's grace entered my mind,
My mind has never strayed to seek such distractions.
Accustomed long to contemplating love and compassion,
I have forgotten all difference between myself and others.
Accustomed long to meditating on my Guru as enhaloed over my head,
I have forgotten all those who rule by power and prestige.
Accustomed long to meditating on my guardian deities as inseparable from myself,
I have forgotten the lowly fleshly form.
Accustomed long to meditating on the secret whispered truths,
I have forgotten all that is said in written or printed books.
Accustomed, as I have been, to the study of the eternal Truth,
I've lost all knowledge of ignorance.
Accustomed, as I've been, to contemplating both nirvana and samsara as inherent in myself,
I have forgotten to think of hope and fear.
Accustomed, as I've been, to meditating on this life and the next as one,
I have forgotten the dread of birth and death.
Accustomed long to studying, by myself, my own experiences,
I have forgotten the need to seek the opinions of friends and brethren.
Accustomed long to applying each new experience to my own spiritual growth,
I have forgotten all creeds and dogmas.
Accustomed long to meditating on the Unborn, the Indestructible, the Unchanging,
I have forgotten all definitions of this or that particular goal.
Accustomed long to meditating on all visible phenomena as the Dharmakaya,
I have forgotten all meditations on what is produced by the mind.
Accustomed long to keeping my mind in the uncreated state of freedom,
I have forgotten all conventions and artificialities.
Accustomed long to humbleness, of body and mind,
I have forgotten the pride and haughty manner of the mighty.
Accustomed long to regarding my fleshly body as my hermitage,
I have forgotten the ease and comfort of retreats and monasteries.
Accustomed long to knowing the meaning of the Wordless,
I have forgotten the way to trace the roots of verbs, and the
sources of words and phrases.
You, 0 learned one, may trace out these things in your books
[if you wish].





3743 |  Buddhism, Mahayana
Source : Evans-Wentz, 1971;pp 245-247  








A ccustomed long to meditating on the Unborn, the Indestructible, the Unchanging,
I have forgotten all definitions of this or that particular goal.





3742 |  Buddhism, Mahayana
Source : Evans-Wentz, 1971;pp 245-247  








A ccustomed long to applying each new experience to my own spiritual growth,
I have forgotten all creeds and dogmas.





3741 |  Buddhism, Mahayana
Source : Evans-Wentz, 1971;pp 245-247  








A ccustomed long to studying, by myself, my own experiences,
I have forgotten the need to seek the opinions of friends and brethren.





3740 |  Buddhism, Mahayana
Source : Evans-Wentz, 1971;pp 245-247  








A ccustomed long to meditating on my Guru as enhaloed over my head,
I have forgotten all those who rule by power and prestige.





3739 |  Buddhism, Mahayana
Source : Evans-Wentz, 1971;pp 245-247  








A ccustomed long to contemplating love and compassion,
I have forgotten all difference between myself and others.





3738 |  Buddhism, Mahayana
Source : Evans-Wentz, 1971;pp 245-247  






Page:  1




On other page(s):  Life et teaching of Milarepa




♥ Our Project ♥ ⇄ ♥ Your project ♥