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Saint Symeon the New Theologian



Spiritual quotes of
Saint Symeon the New Theologian

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O grandeur of ineffable glory! O excess of love! He Who embraces all things makes His home within a mortal corruptible man, He by Whose indwelling might all things are governed, and the man becomes as a woman heavy with child. O astonishing miracle and incomprehensible deeds and mysteries of the incomprehensible God! A man carries God consciously within himself as light, carries Him Who has brought all things into being and created them, including the one who carries Him now. He carries Him within as a treasure inexpressible, unspeakable, without quality, quantity, or form, immaterial, shapeless, yet with form in beauty inexplicable, altogether simple, like light, Him Who transcends all light. And, clenching his hands at his sides, this man walks in our midst and is ignored by everyone who surrounds him. Who can then adequately explain the joy of such a man? Will he not be more blessed and more glorious than any emperor? Than whom, or than how many visible worlds, will he not be more wealthy? And in what shall such a man ever be lacking? Truly, in no way shall he lack any of God's good things.




Christianity / Orthodoxy Quote n°3437 | 
On the Mystical Life : The Ethical Discourses. Trans. Alexander Golitzin. Crestwood, NY: St. Vladimir's Seminary Press, 1996,(Vol. 2), p. 135 

   




T hou Thyself becamest visible… {Thou} didst grant me to see the outline of Thy form beyond shape. At that time Thou tookest me out of the world -- I might even say, out of the body, but Thou didst not grant me to know this exactly. Thou didst shine yet more brightly and it seemed that I saw Thee clearly in Thy entirety. When I said, "O Master, who art Thou?" then, for the first time Thou didst grant me, the prodigal, to hear Thy voice. How gently didst Thou speak to me, who was beside myself, in awe and trembling… Thou saidest, "I am God who have become man for your sake. Because you have sought me with all your soul, behold, from now on you will be My brother, My fellow heir, and My friend




Christianity / Orthodoxy Quote n°3436 | 
The Discourses, pp. 375-376, Trans. C.J. de Catanzaro. Ramsey, N.J.: Paulist Press, 1980. 

   




H ow good it is thankfully to proclaim the blessings of God, who loves men!… By grace I have received grace (cf. Jn. 1:16), by doing well I have received [His] kindness, by fire I have been requited with fire, by flame with flame. As I ascended I was given other ascents, at the end of the ascent I was given light, and by the light an even clearer light. In the midst thereof a sun shone brightly and from it a ray shone forth that filled all things. The object of my thought remained beyond understanding, and in this state I remained while I wept most sweetly and marveled at the ineffable. The divine mind conversed with my own mind and taught me, saying, "Do you realize what My power has done to you out of love for men because of but a little faith and patience that strengthens your love? Behold, though you are subject to death, you have become immortal, and though you are ruled by corruption you find yourself above it. You live in the world and yet you are with Me; you are clothed with a body and yet you are not weighed down by any of the pleasures of the body. You are puny in appearance, yet you see intellectually. It is in very deed I who have brought you into being out of nothing."




Christianity / Orthodoxy Quote n°3435 | 
The Discourses, p. 205, Trans. C.J. de Catanzaro. Ramsey, N.J.: Paulist Press, 1980. 

   




T he soul cannot live unless it is ineffably and without confusion united to God, who is truly the life eternal (cf. 1 John 5:20). Before this union in knowledge, vision, and perception it is dead, even though it is endowed with intellect and is by nature immortal…




Christianity / Orthodoxy Quote n°3434 | 
The Discourses, pp. 182-184, Trans. C.J. de Catanzaro. Ramsey, N.J.: Paulist Press, 1980. 

   




A s we ascend to that which is more perfect, He who is without form or shape comes no longer without form or without shape. Nor does He cause His light to come to us and be present with us in silence. But how? He comes in a definite form indeed, though it is a divine one. Yet God does not show Himself in a particular pattern or likeness, but in simplicity, and takes the form of an incomprehensible, inaccessible, and formless light. We cannot possibly say or express more than this; still He appears clearly and is consciously known and clearly seen, though He is invisible. He sees and hears invisibly and, just as friend speaks to friend face to face (cf. Ex. 33:11), so He who by nature is God speaks to those whom by grace He has begotten as gods. He loves like a father, and in turn He is fervently loved by His sons.




Christianity / Orthodoxy Quote n°3433 | 
The Discourses, p. 365, Trans. C.J. de Catanzaro. Ramsey, N.J.: Paulist Press, 1980. 

   




G od} is called light, Who transcends all light, because He illumines us; and life, Who is beyond all life, because He vivifies us. Shining around us all, and encircling and cherishing us with the glory of His divinity, He is called raiment, and so we saw that we clothe ourselves with Him Who is intangible in every way and Who cannot be grasped. Uniting Himself without mingling with our soul, and making it all as light, He is said to indwell us and, uncircumscribed, become circumscribed.




Christianity / Orthodoxy Quote n°3432 | 
On the Mystical Life : The Ethical Discourses. Trans. Alexander Golitzin. Crestwood, NY: St. Vladimir's Seminary Press, 1996, (Vol. 2)", pp. 93-94 

   




H itherto I had frequently seen a light, at times within, when my soul had enjoyed calmness and peace. At times it appeared to me externally, from afar, or even it was completely hidden, and by its hiddenness caused me the unbearable pain of thinking I would not see it again. But when I lamented and wept and displayed complete solitude and obedience and humility it appeared to me again. It was like the sun as it penetrates through the thickness of mist and gradually shows itself a gently glowing sphere. Thus Thou, the ineffable, the invisible, the impalpable, the immovable, who always are everywhere present in all things and fillest everything, at all times, or if I may say so, by day and by night, art seen and art hidden. Thou goest away and Thou comest, Thou dost vanish from sight and Thou suddenly appearest. So bit by bit Thou didst scatter the darkness that was within me; Thou didst dispel the mist and dissolve the thickness; Thou didst clean the dim eyes of my intellect. Thou didst remove the barriers of my eyes and didst open them; Thou tookest away the veil of insensitivity. At the same time Thou didst put to sleep all passion and every fleshly pleasure and totally expel them from me. Having thus brought me to this state Thou didst clear the heaven of every mist. By "the heaven" I mean the soul Thou hast cleansed in which Thou comest invisibly (how or from whence I know not). Thou who art everywhere present art suddenly found and manifested like another sun. O ineffable condescension!




Christianity / Orthodoxy Quote n°3431 | 
The Discourses, pp. 364-365, Trans. C.J. de Catanzaro. Ramsey, N.J.: Paulist Press, 1980. 

   




W hile many have seen {the light of God}, they have not all acquired it, just like many have seen the great treasure in the royal vaults and have gone away empty. While a divine light and illumination often comes in the beginning to those who are fervently repenting, it passes away immediately. If they give themselves up even to death itself and seek it with hard labor, presenting themselves to the Lord as worthy and blameless in every way, then at last they receive it again come back to them. If however, they become a little lazy and take leave from throwing themselves into greater labors by loving their own souls, they become unworthy of so great a gift and do not enter, while still living in the body, into everlasting life.




Christianity / Orthodoxy Quote n°3430 | 
On the Mystical Life : The Ethical Discourses. Trans. Alexander Golitzin. Crestwood, NY: St. Vladimir's Seminary Press, 1996, (Vol. 1), p. 159 

   




B lessed are they… who have received Christ coming as light in the darkness {Jn 1:5,12}, for they are become sons of light and of day {1 Thes 5:5}.

Blessed are they who even now have put on His light, for they are clothed already with the wedding garment. They will not be bound hand and foot, nor will they be cast into the everlasting fire… {cf Mt 22:11-13}

Blessed are they who hourly taste of the ineffable light with the mouth of their intellect, for they shall walk "becomingly as in the day" [Rom 13:13], and spend all their time in rejoicing…

Blessed are they who have kindled the light in their hearts even now and have kept it unquenched, for on their departing this life they shall go radiant to meet the Bridegroom, and go in with Him to the bridal chamber bearing their lamps… {cf Mt 25:1-13}

Blessed are they who ever weep bitterly for their sins, for the light shall seize them and change the bitter into sweet {cf Mt 5:4}.

Blessed are they who shine with the divine light and who see their own infirmity and understand the deformity of their soul's vesture, for they shall weep without failing and, but by the channels of their tears, be washed clean.

Blessed are they who have drawn near the divine light and entered within it and become wholly light, having been mingled with it, for they have completely taken off their soiled vesture and shall weep bitter tears no more {cf Rom 13:12-14}.

Blessed are they who see their own clothing shining as Christ, for they shall be filled hourly with joy inexpressible and shall weep tears of astounding sweetness, perceiving that they have become themselves already sons and co-participants of the resurrection.

Blessed are they who have the eye of their intellect ever open and with prayer see the light and converse with it mouth to mouth, for they are of equal honor with the angels and, dare I say it, have and shall become higher than the angels, for the latter sing praises while the former intercede. And, if they have become and are ever becoming such while still living in the body and impeded by the corruption of the flesh, what shall they be after the Resurrection and after they have received that spiritual and incorruptible body? Certainly, they shall not be merely the equals of angels, but indeed like the angels' Master, as it is written: "But we know," he says, "that when He appears we shall be like Him" [1 Jn 3:2].

Blessed is that monk who is present before God in prayer and who sees Him and is seen by Him {cf Jn 14:21, Mt 5:8}, and perceives himself as having gone beyond the world and as being in God alone, and is unable to know whether he happens to be in the body or outside the body {2 Cor 12:2-3}, for he will hear "ineffable speech which it is not lawful for a man to utter" [2 Cor 12:4], and shall see "what no eye has seen, nor ear heard, nor the heart of man conceived" [1 Cor 2:9].

Blessed is he who has seen the light of the world take form within himself, for he, having Christ as an embryo within {cf Gal 4:19}, shall be reckoned His mother, as He Himself Who does not lie has promised, saying: "Here are my mother and brothers and friends." Who? "Those who hear the word of God and do it" [Lk 8:2]. So those who do not keep His commandments deprive themselves voluntarily of so great a grace, because the thing was and is and will be possible, and has happened and happens and will happen for all who fulfill His ordinances.





Christianity / Orthodoxy Quote n°3429 | 
On the Mystical Life : The Ethical Discourses. Trans. Alexander Golitzin. Crestwood, NY: St. Vladimir's Seminary Press, 1996, (Vol. 1), pp. 166-169 

   




H e therefore who has died to the world -- for this is the cross -- and lives no longer himself, but it is Christ Who lives in him (Gal. 2:20); who has mortified his earthly members (Col. 3:5), that is, the passionate sensations of the body, such that he has become no longer a participant in any passion or evil lust: how, tell me, can he take in any kind of passionate sensation, or surrender to any movement of pleasure, or ever be troubled in his heart?




Christianity / Orthodoxy Quote n°3428 | 
On the Mystical Life : The Ethical Discourses. Trans. Alexander Golitzin. Crestwood, NY: St. Vladimir's Seminary Press, 1996, (Vol. 2), p. 76 

   




U nless we become dead to the world and the things in the world (1 John 2:15), how shall we live the "life that is hid in Christ" (Col. 3:3) when we have not died for the sake of God? How, as holy Symeon {the Studite} said, shall we contemplate God dwelling is us as light?




Christianity / Orthodoxy Quote n°3427 | 
The Discourses, p. 127, Trans. C.J. de Catanzaro. Ramsey, N.J.: Paulist Press, 1980. 

   




B y crucifying oneself to the world, and the world to oneself (Gal. 6:14)}, brethren, our souls therefore die before death and rise again before the resurrection of the body in deed, in power, in experience, and in truth. When the mortal attitude has been eliminated by the immortal mind and mortality has been driven out by life, then, as though it had risen from the dead, the soul manifestly sees itself, just as those who rise from sleep see themselves. It recognizes God who has raised it; as it perceives Him it gives Him thanks and worships Him and glorifies His infinite goodness. On the other hand, the body is entirely without breath, motion, and memory in relation to its own desires, but in these respects becomes altogether dead and lifeless.




Christianity / Orthodoxy Quote n°3426 | 
The Discourses, p. 296, Trans. C.J. de Catanzaro. Ramsey, N.J.: Paulist Press, 1980. 

   




C hrist exhorts us to take up our cross and follow him (Luke 9:23)} I have learned from Scripture and from experience itself that the cross comes at the end for no other reason than that we must endure trials and tribulations and, finally, voluntary death itself… we learn for sure that cross and death consist in nothing else than the complete mortification of self-will. He who pursues his own will, however, slightly, will never be able to observe the precept of Christ the Savior.




Christianity / Orthodoxy Quote n°3425 | 
The Discourses, p. 232, Trans. C.J. de Catanzaro. Ramsey, N.J.: Paulist Press, 1980. 

   




I n truth those who have the skill properly to direct and heal rational souls are rare, and especially at the present time. Many, perhaps, have made a pretense of fasting and vigil and a form of godliness… As for learning many things by heart and teaching them in words, this is easy for most men, but as for eliminating the passions and acquiring the capital virtues so that they cannot be lost, very few are found [who do this]. Now we call "capital virtues" humility, which eliminates the passions and obtains heavenly and angelic impassibility, and love, which never ceases or fails (cf. 1 Cor. 13:8) but continually presses on to that which lies ahead (cf. Phil. 3:13-14) as it adds desire to desire and love to love. It supplies perfect discernment, and by itself is a good guide to those who follow after it and infallibly carries us across the spiritual sea… Do not follow the wolf instead of the shepherd (cf. Mt. 7:15), nor enter into a flock that is diseased (cf. Ezek. 34:4).




Christianity / Orthodoxy Quote n°3424 | 
The Discourses, p. 236-237, Trans. C.J. de Catanzaro. Ramsey, N.J.: Paulist Press, 1980. 

   




D o not be alone by yourself, lest you be seen carried off by the world who destroys souls, or succumb to one disease after the other and so die spiritually, or, as you succumb, you attain to that woe (cf. Eccles. 4:10). He who gives himself in the hand of a good teacher will have no such worries, but will live without anxiety and be saved in Christ Jesus our Lord, to whom be glory forever. Amen.




Christianity / Orthodoxy Quote n°3423 | 
The Discourses, p. 237, Trans. C.J. de Catanzaro. Ramsey, N.J.: Paulist Press, 1980. 

   




G od is fire and He is so called by all the inspired Scripture (cf. Heb. 12:29). The soul of each of us is a lamp. Now a lamp is wholly in darkness, even though it be filled with oil or tow or other combustible matter, until it receives fire and is kindled… The man whose soul's lamp is still in darkness, that is, untorched by the divine fire, stands the more in need of a guide with a shining torch who will discern his actions.




Christianity / Orthodoxy Quote n°3422 | 
The Discourses, p. 339, Trans. C.J. de Catanzaro. Ramsey, N.J.: Paulist Press, 1980. 

   




N or should you circulate in search of famous monks, nor inquire into their lives. Rather, if by God's grace you have chanced on a spiritual father, tell only him about yourself. If not, but as seeing Christ, look always at Him and in all things keep Him alone as the One Who sees your sorrow and affliction.




Christianity / Orthodoxy Quote n°3421 | 
On the Mystical Life : The Ethical Discourses. Trans. Alexander Golitzin. Crestwood, NY: St. Vladimir's Seminary Press, 1996, (Vol. 2), p.95 

   




C onstantly call on God, that He may show you a man who is able to direct you well, one whom you ought to obey as though he were God Himself, whose instruction you must carry out without hesitation… It is better for you to be called a disciple of a disciple rather than to live by your own devices and gather the worthless fruits of your own will… So, brother, do as we have said, and go to the man whom God shows you, either mystically in person, or externally through His servant.




Christianity / Orthodoxy Quote n°3420 | 
The Discourses, p. 232, Trans. C.J. de Catanzaro. Ramsey, N.J.: Paulist Press, 1980. 

   




P aul says that those who are still alive will be lifted up to the clouds where they will meet the Lord in the air. (1 Thess. 4:17)} … in every way endeavor to be lifted up even but a little from the earth. Should this wonderful thing happen, which would astound you, that you should float up from the earth into the air, you would not at all want to descend to the earth and stay there! But by "earth" I mean the fleshly mind, by "air" the spiritual. Once the mind is set free from evil thoughts and through it we contemplate the freedom that Christ our God has bestowed on us, we shall never again be willing to descend to our former slavery to sin and the fleshly mind.




Christianity / Orthodoxy Quote n°3419 | 
The Discourses,Trans. C.J. de Catanzaro. Ramsey, N.J.: Paulist Press, 1980. 

   




J ohn tells us that we should neither love the world nor the things of the world. (1 John 2:15-16)} But what is "the world"? What are the "things that are in the world"? Listen! It is not gold, sliver, or horses, or mules. All these things that serve our physical needs we ourselves possess {even though we are monks}. It is not meat, nor bread, nor wine, for we ourselves partake of these things and eat them in moderation. It is not houses, nor baths, nor fields, nor vineyards, nor suburban properties, for great and small monasteries consist of these. So what is the world? It is sin, brethren, and attachment to things and passions…




Christianity / Orthodoxy Quote n°3418 | 
The Discourses, pp. 109-110, Trans. C.J. de Catanzaro. Ramsey, N.J.: Paulist Press, 1980. 

   




P eter said that he and the other disciples had forsaken everything in order to follow Christ (Mt. 19:27)} By the word everything he included lands, money, their own wills, to the point of contempt and abhorrence for this transitory life in order that they might taste that life which is substantial and eternal. It is altogether sweeter and preferable; it is nothing else but God Himself.




Christianity / Orthodoxy Quote n°3417 | 
The Discourses, p. 357, Trans. C.J. de Catanzaro. Ramsey, N.J.: Paulist Press, 1980. 

   




T he poor in spirit (Mt. 5:3) have no attachment to the things that are present, nor are they even in thought passionately involved with them, not even to the extent of simple enjoyment.




Christianity / Orthodoxy Quote n°3416 | 
The Discourses, p. 52, Trans. C.J. de Catanzaro. Ramsey, N.J.: Paulist Press, 1980. 

   




T hose who are ailing do not know these things. Indeed, they do not even understand that they are sick. And who then can ever persuade with argument people thus inclined that they are under the sway of sickness and disease? They imagine rather that it is health to accomplish the wishes of the flesh, and to practise all its lust and desire. And, just as no one will ever make those who are gone mad and deranged take account of the fact that they are insane, just so neither will anyone persuade those who are wallowing in the passions, and ruled by them, and unconscious of their being possessed, that they are in a bad way, and so make them change for the better. For they are blind, and neither do they believe that anyone else can see. Thus they live, deprived of sight and unconvinced they can lift up their eyes.




Christianity / Orthodoxy Quote n°3415 | 
On the Mystical Life : The Ethical Discourses. Trans. Alexander Golitzin. Crestwood, NY: St. Vladimir's Seminary Press, 1996,(Vol. 2), p. 75 

   




I t is not only he who commits sin who is separated from God and becomes His enemy, but also he who loves it and covets something, or has an attachment in his heart to anything that is on earth. This constitutes friendship with the world (James 4:4). Thus is is clearly proven that, even if one is deprived of everything and commits no sin whatever in action, but merely likes it and favors it and, so to speak, is attached to it, he is an enemy of God. Thus John says, "If any one loves the world, love for the Father is not in him" (1 John 2:15). So the Lord Himself says, "You must love the Lord your God with all your mind and with all your strength and with all your soul" (Mk. 12:30). Therefore he who craves or has an attachment to anything else transgresses this commandment.




Christianity / Orthodoxy Quote n°3414 | 
The Discourses, p. 111, Trans. C.J. de Catanzaro. Ramsey, N.J.: Paulist Press, 1980. 

   




W e think we will receive the full knowledge of God's truth by means of worldly wisdom, and fancy that this mere reading of the God-inspired writings of the saints is to comprehend Orthodoxy, and that this is an exact and certain knowlege of the Holy Trinity. Nor is this all, but the more august among us foolishly suppose that the contemplation which comes to pass only through the Spirit in those who are worthy is the same as the thoughts produced by beir own reasoning. How ridiculous! How callous!




Christianity / Orthodoxy Quote n°3413 | 
On the Mystical Life : The Ethical Discourses. Trans. Alexander Golitzin. Crestwood, NY: St. Vladimir's Seminary Press, 1996,(Vol. 2), p. 113 

   




B ut neither should you try to seize {God} with the hands of your intellect, for He is ungraspable, and the more you make bold to touch Him or fancy that you hold Him, the more you will have nothing inside and He will immediately disappear from you entirely.




Christianity / Orthodoxy Quote n°3412 | 
On the Mystical Life : The Ethical Discourses. Trans. Alexander Golitzin. Crestwood, NY: St. Vladimir's Seminary Press, 1996,(Vol. 2), p. 136 

   




H ow then was {the Word} everywhere before making the world and, when He had made it, how was He shining in it without the world comprehending Him? (cf Jn 1:1-15). Pay careful attention: God "Who is everywhere present and fills all things" was not, Scripture says, separated from it by location when He created this sensible world, but by the nature of the glory of His divinity, it being evident that nothing created approached or comprehended Him at all. Indeed, being inseparable from all He is as clearly in all.




Christianity / Orthodoxy Quote n°3411 | 
On the Mystical Life : The Ethical Discourses. Trans. Alexander Golitzin. Crestwood, NY: St. Vladimir's Seminary Press, 1996,(Vol. 1), p. 155 

   




G od, the cause of all, is One… That One is not such as are visible things. Rather, He transcends incomparably and inalterably all the visible world…




Christianity / Orthodoxy Quote n°3410 | 
On the Mystical Life : The Ethical Discourses. Trans. Alexander Golitzin. Crestwood, NY: St. Vladimir's Seminary Press, 1996, (Vol. 1), p. 122 

   




S o I entered the place where I usually prayed and mindful of the words of the holy man I began to say, "Holy God". At once I was so greatly moved to tears and loving desire for God that I would be unable to describe in words the joy and the delight I then felt. I fell prostrate on the ground, and at once I saw, and behold, a great light was immaterially shining on me and seized hold of my whole mind and soul, so that I was struck with amazement at the unexpected marvel and I was, as it were, in ecstasy. Moreover I forgot the place where I stood, who I was, and where and could only cry out, 'Lord, have mercy,' so that when I came to myself I discovered I was reciting this. But who it was that was speaking, and who moved my tongue, I do not know - only God knows.




Christianity / Orthodoxy Quote n°3368 | 
Cathecetical Discourse XVI 

   




D uring the day he managed a patrician's household and daily went to the palace, engaged in worldly affairs, so that no one was aware of his pursuits. …One day, as he stood and recited, "God, have mercy upon me, a sinner" Lk. 18:13), uttering it with his mind rather than his mouth, suddenly a flood of divine radiance appeared from above and filled all the room. As this happened the young man lost all awareness [of his surroundings] and forgot that he was in a house or that he was under a roof. He saw nothing but light all around him and did not know if he was standing on the ground. He was not afraid of falling: he was not concerned with the world nor did anything pertaining to men and corporeal beings enter his mind. Instead, he seemed to himself to have turned into light. Oblivious of all the world he was filled with tears and with ineffable joy and gladness. His mind then ascended to heaven and beheld yet another light, which was clearer than that which was close at hand. In a wonderful manner there appeared to him standing close to that light, the saint of whom we have spoken, the old man equal to angels, who had given him the commandment and the book. …




Christianity / Orthodoxy Quote n°3366 | 
The Catechetical Discourses XXII 

   




T hat human being who is inwardly illumined by the light of the Holy Spirit cannot endure the vision of it, but falls face down on the ground and cries out in great fear and wonder, because he has seen and experienced something that is beyond nature, thought, or conception. He becomes like someone suddenly inflamed with a violent fever; as though on fire and powerless to control the flames, he is beside himself, totally incapable of controlling himself. And though he weeps incessant tears that bring some relief, the flame of his desire breaks out even more intensely. Then his tears flow even more abundantly and washed by their flow, he becomes even more radiant. When, utterly incandescent, he has become like light, then the saying of Saint Gregory of Nazianzos is fulfilled, "God is united with gods and known by them" in the sense perhaps that he is now united to those who have joined themselves to him, and revealed to those who have come to know him.




Christianity / Orthodoxy Quote n°2808 | 
The Philokalia: The Complete Text, vol. 4 (London: Faber & Faber, 1995) 

   




T hat human being who is inwardly illumined by the light of the Holy Spirit cannot endure the vision of it, but falls face down on the ground and cries out in great fear and wonder, because he has seen and experienced something that is beyond nature, thought, or conception.




Christianity / Orthodoxy Quote n°2807 | 
The Philokalia: The Complete Text, vol. 4 (London: Faber & Faber, 1995) 

   




C ome, true light.
Come, life eternal.
Come, hidden mystery.
Come, treasure without name.
Come, reality beyond all words.
Come, person beyond all understanding.
Come, rejoicing without end.
Come, light that knows no evening.
Come, unfailing expectation of the saved.
Come, raising of the fallen.
Come, resurrection of the dead.
Come all-powerful, for unceasingly you create, refashion and change all things by your will alone.
Come, invisible whom none may touch and handle.
Come, for you continue always unmoved, yet at every instant you are wholly in movement; you draw near to us who lie in hell, yet you remain higher than the heavens.
Come, for your name fills our hearts with longing and is ever on our lips; yet who you are and what your nature is, we cannot say or know. Come, Alone to the alone. Come, for you are yourself the desire that is within me. Come, my breath and my life. Come, the consolation of my humble soul. Come, my joy, my glory, my endless delight.





Christianity / Orthodoxy Quote n°2806 | 
Saint Symeon the New Theologian, adapted from the translation by Kallistos Ware in The Orthodox Way (Crestwood, NY: St. V1adimir's Seminary Press, 1979). 

   


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The Buddha Expounding Amitabha Sutra
The Cultivation Guidelines for Pure Land School Practitioners
The Dhammapada
The Discourse on the Ten Wholesome Ways of Action
The Eight Great Awakenings Sutra
The Heart of Prajna Paramita Sutra
The Lankavatara Sutra
The Lotus Sutra
The Maha Prajna Paramita
The Maha-Vaipulya Tathagata’s Unimaginable State Sutra
The Platform Sutra
The Seng-ts’an
The Shobo Genzo
The Sigalovada Sutta: The Discourse to Sigala The Layperson’s Code of Discipline
The Surangama Sutra
The Sutra in Forty-Two Sections
The Sutra of Immeasurable Life
The Sutra of the Past Vows of Earth Store Bodhisattva
The Sutra of Visualization of the Buddha of Infinite Life
The Sutra on Generating the Supreme Aspiration of Bodhisattvas
The Sutra on Praise of the Pure Land and Protection by Shakyamuni
The Sutra on the Buddha’s Bequeathed Teaching
The Vajra Prajna Paramita Sutra
The Vajradhvaha Sutra
Upasaka Precepts Sutra
Various Sutras

Christianity
The Bible
The Corpus Hermetica
The Philokalia

Confucianism
Guidelines for Being a Good Person
The Bai Hu Tong
The Book of Etiquette & Ceremonial
The Book of Ode
The Book of Ritual
The Books of Changes
The Doctrine of Filial Piety
The Imperial Edict of Emperor Yong Zheng
The Luxuriant Dew of the Spring and Autumn Annals
The Zhongyong

Daoism
The 100 Diseases & Medicines
The Annals of Lu Buwei
The Huai-Nan Tzu
The Jade Emperor’s Mind Seal
The Liezi
The Qing Jing Jing
The Su Shu
The Tai Shang Lao Jun Jie Jing
The Tai Shang Sheng Xuan Xiao Zai Hu Ming Miao Jing
The Tai Shang Xu hang tian Zun Si Shi Jui Zhang Jing
The Tai Shang Xuan Ling Bei Dou Ben Ming Yan Sheng Zhen Jing
The treatise on the unseen merits
The Yellow Emperor’s scripture of the Unconscious Unification
Treatise of the Most Exalted One on Cause and Effect

Hinduism
Bhagavata Purana
Gautama Smriti
Padarthadharmasamgraha
Samkhya Sutra
Tantric scriptures
The Ashtavakra Gita
The Atharva Veda
The Avadhuta Gita
The Bhagavat Gita
The Bhakti Sutras
The Devi Gita
The Law of Manu
The Mahabarata
The Panchadasi
The Ramayana
The Rig Veda
The Sama Veda
The Thirrukkural
The Upanishads
The Vishnu Purana
The Vishnu Sahasranam
The Yajur Veda
The Yoga vasishtha
Yajnavalkya Smriti
Yoga Sutra

Islam
The Quran

Jainism
The Acaranga Sutra
The Bhagavati Aradhana
The Khamemi Savve Jiva Sutra
The Mulachara
The Namokar Mantra
The Saman Suttam
The Shivmastu Sarva Jagatah Sutra
The Tattvartha Sutra
The Uttaradhyayana

Judaism
The Bava Kamma
The Beth Middot
The Book of Proverbs
The Chofetz Chaim
The Ecclesiastes
The Imré binah
The Ketuvim
The Ma’alat Hamiddot
The Misdrashs
The Mivchar Hapeninim
The Moré Névoukhim
The Nevi'im
The No’am Hamiddot
The Pirkei Avot
The Proverbs
The Psalm
The Sayings of the Fathers
The Talmud
The Tanchuma
The Torah
The Tosefta
The Wisdom of Salomon
The Zohar

Sikhism
Guru Gobind Singh Ji
The Sri Dasam Granth Ji
The Sri Guru Granth Sahib Ji

Tradition
The Nihong
The Tibetan Book of the Dead

Zoroastrianism
The Avesta
The Menok i Khrat




Quotes by authors


Bahá’í
'Abdu'l-Bahá
Bahá’u’lláh

Buddhism
Bassui Zenji
Bodhidharma
Buddha Sakyamuni
Hakuin
Huang Po
Hui Neng
Milarepa
Nagarjuna
Seng-Chao
Vimalakirti
Yung-chia Ta-shih

Christianity
Abbot Vasilios of Iveron Monastery
Angela of Foligno
Desert Fathers
Diadochos of Photiki
Dionysius the Areopagite
Jacob Boehme
Jean Pierre de Caussade
Jesus Christ
John Ruusbroec
Martin Luther King
Meister Eckhart
Mother Teresa
Nicephorus the Solitary
Nicholas of Cusa
Saint Evagrios the Solitary
Saint Francis of Assisi
Saint Gregory of Nyssa
Saint Hesychios the Priest
Saint Isaac the Syrian
Saint John of the Cross
Saint Macarius of Egypt
Saint Mark the Ascetic
Saint Paul
Saint Symeon the New Theologian
Saint Teresa of Avila
Thomas a Kempis
Unknown

Confucianism
Chang Tsai
Chow Tun-i
Confucius
Lu Hsiang Shan
Meng-tzu
Shao Yong
Wang Yangming

Daoism
Ho Shang Gong
Invocations
Kuo Hsiang
Lao Tzu
Tchuang Tzu
Wang Bi
Wenzi
Zhang Bo Duan

Hinduism
Amirthanandamayi
Aurobindo Ghose
Bhaskarananda
Jiddu Krishnamurti
Jnaneshwar
Meher Baba
Osho
Paramhansa Yogananda
Prabhavananda
Radhakrishnan
Ramakrishna
Ramana Maharshi
Ramdas
Ramdasa
Satya Sai Baba
Shankara
Shirdi Sai Baba
Shri Yukteswar
Sivananda
Tagore
Tukaram
Vivekananda

Islam
Abd el-Kader
Abou Bakr As-Siddiq
Abu Sa'id
Ali Ibn Abou Talib
Al-Junayd
Araqi
Attar
Bistami
Dhu-l-Nun
Ghazzali
Hallaj
Hujwiri
Ibn 'Arabi
Ibn' Ata' Allah
Iraqi
Jami
Muhammad
Others Sufis Teaching
Rabia al-Adawiyya
Rumi
Shabistari
Sheikh Badruddin
Sheikh Muzaffer
Umar al-Khattab
Uthman ibn Affan

Jainism
Acharya Kundkund
Jinendra Varni
Mahavira
Nemichandra
Pandit Daulat Ram

Judaism
Achad Ha’am
Agur ben Jakeh
Avraham Ben Ezra
Chaim Nahman Bialik
Chaim of Valozhin
Hasdai
Jeshua ben Sirach
Jewish Proverb
Martin Buber
Mishle Yehoshua
MOCHÈ bèn Maïmone
Moshe Ben Ezra
Rabbi Nathan
Rabbi Shimeon Yal?u? Shim'oni
Rabbin Nachman of Bratslav
Rachi
Rebbe Menachem Schneerson
Salomon Ibn Gabirol
The Kotzker Rabbi
Yochanan Tversky

Others Beliefs
Dadu
Kabir

Philosophy
Epictetus
Heraclitus
Marcus Aurelius
Plato
Plotinus
Seneca

Sikhism
Bhai Gurdas Ji Vaaran
Guru Nanak

Tradition
African Culture
African Proverb
Arabic Proverbs
Egyptology
Japanese Proverb
Native American Culture
Native Americans Proverb
Pacific Islands Culture

Zoroastrianism
Zoroaster




Quotes by schools of thought


 Bahá’í

 Buddhism
  ‣Mahayana
   ‣Madhyamaka
   ‣Zen (Chan)

 Christianity
  ‣Catholicism
  ‣Gnostics
  ‣Orthodoxy
  ‣Protestantism

 Confucianism
  ‣Neo Confucianism

 Daoism
  ‣Neo Daoism

 Hinduism
  ‣Kriya Yoga
  ‣Tantra

 Islam
  ‣Sufism

 Jainism

 Judaism
  ‣Hassidism

 Others Beliefs
  ‣Litterature
  ‣Sciences
  ‣Spirituality

 Philosophy
  ‣Néoplatonism
  ‣Platonism
  ‣Pythagoricism
  ‣Stoicism

 Sikhism

 Tradition
  ‣African
   ‣Egyptian
  ‣Asian
   ‣Japanese
   ‣Tibetan
  ‣Australian
  ‣Middle East
  ‣Native American
  ‣Pacific Islands

 Zoroastrianism




Quotes by subjects


Illusion ?
Creation
Emptiness
Qi, Prana, Pneuma
Spiritual worlds
Yin & Yang

The Absolute
Dao
God
Omnipresence
The One
The Self
Undifferentiated & Unborn
Universal Mind & Conciousness

The Saints
Awakening
Ecstasy
Goals and Emotions
Mystical life
Non Action
Oneness
Revelation & Intuition
Surrendering your will to God

Spiritual Practice
About practicing
Dhikr, Nembutsu, Mantra & Jesus Prayer
Everyday
Meditation
Prayers
Yoga & Breath techniques

The Ways
About the Way
Developing one's Nature
Faith
Know yourself
Love & Devotion
Moral and Virtue
Practice what you know
The Eightfold Path

The Man
About Man
Being
Ego
Man's True Nature
Mind & Soul

Detachement
About detachement
from body senses
from desires
from discrimination
from dogmatism
from Ego, I and mine
from hight spiritual state
from intellect
from thoughts
from words
from yourself

Classics
Accepting your Fate
Being & Non Being
Causation & Karma
Desirs & Temptation
Ignorance & Knowledge
Poems
Realization
Realizing God Presence
Returning to the Source
Spiritual Advices
Spiritual Guides

Others
Breath
Good & Evil
Humor
Impermanence
Life
Light
Proverbs
Silence
Suffering
Unclassied
Wisdom




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