Inter -  Faiths  Dialogue



Interreligious dialogue : Illusion ? > Yin & Yang

Onelittleangel > Illusion ? > Yin & Yang
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T he life of plants is based on earth [for their roots grow downward]. Their transition from integration to disintegration depends on the rise and fall of yin and yang.




Confucianism / Neo Confucianism 2389 | 
Chang Tsai, Cheng-meng, Cheng-meng, ch. 5, Chang Tzu ch'uan-shu, sppy, 2:16a, in Wing-Tsit Chan, Chinese Philosophy, Chapter 30 







N o two of the products of creation are alike. From this we know that although the number of things is infinite, at bottom there is nothing without yin or yang [which differentiate them]. From this we know also that the transformations and changes in the universe are due to these two fundamental forces.




Confucianism / Neo Confucianism 2378 | 
Chang Tsai, Cheng-meng, Ch.1, in Wing-Tsit Chan, Chinese Philosophy, Chapter 30 







M aterial force moves and flows in all directions and in all manners. Its two elements unite and give rise to the concrete. Thus the multiplicity of things and human beings is produced. In their ceaseless successions the two elements of yin and yang constitute the great principles of the universe.




Confucianism / Neo Confucianism 2375 | 
Chang Tsai, Cheng-meng, Ch.1, in Wing-Tsit Chan, Chinese Philosophy, Chapter 30 







O nly after [the One] is acted upon will it begin to penetrate [through yin and yang]. Without the two forces there cannot be the One.




Confucianism / Neo Confucianism 2374 | 
Chang Tsai, Cheng-meng, Ch.1, in Wing-Tsit Chan, Chinese Philosophy, Chapter 30 







I f yin and yang do not exist, the One (the Great Ultimate)" can not revealed If the One cannot be revealed then the function of the two forces will cease, Reality and unreality, motion and rest, integration and disintegration, and clearness and turbidity are two different substances. In the final analysis, however, they are one.




Confucianism / Neo Confucianism 2373 | 
Chang Tsai, Cheng-meng, Ch.1, in Wing-Tsit Chan, Chinese Philosophy, Chapter 30 







T he negative and positive spiritual forces (kuei-shen) are the spontaneous activity of the two material forces (yin and yang). Sage hood means absolute sincerity (1) forming a unity with Heaven, and spirit means the Great Vacuity in its wondrous operation and response. All molds and forms in the universe are but dregs of this spiritual transformation.




Confucianism / Neo Confucianism 2372 | 
Chang Tsai, Cheng-meng, Ch.1, in Wing-Tsit Chan, Chinese Philosophy, Chapter 30 
(1) The word ch'eng means more than sincerity in the ordinary sense. It means being true to one's nature and the nature of things, actuality, reality







H eaven is born of activity and Earth is born of tranquillity. The interaction of activity and tranquillity gives full development to the Way of Heaven and Earth. At the first appearance of activity, yang is produced. As activity reaches its limit, yin is produced. The interaction of yin and yang gives full development to the functions of Heaven. At the first appearance of tranquillity, the element of weakness is produced. When weakness reaches its limit, the element of strength is produced. The interaction of these two elements gives full development to the functions of Earth. Greater activity is called major yang, while greater tranquillity is called major yin. Lesser activity is called minor yang, while lesser tranquillity is called minor yin. Major yang constitutes the sun; major yin, the moon; lesser yang, the stars; and lesser yin, the zodiacal spaces. The interaction of the sun, moon, stars, and zodiacal spaces gives full development to the substance of Heaven. Greater tranquillity is called major weakness, while lesser tranquillity is called minor weakness. Greater activity is called major strength, while lesser activity is called minor strength. Lesser weakness constitutes water; major strength, fire; lesser weakness, earth; and lesser strength, stone. The interaction of water, fire, soil, and stone gives full development to substance of Earth.




Confucianism / Neo Confucianism 2351 | 
Shao Yung, Supreme Principle Governing the World (Huang-Chi Ching Shu), 5:I b-2b, in Wing-Tsit Chan, Chinese Philosophy, Chapter 29 







W ithout physical substance, the nature (of man and things) cannot be complete. Without nature, physical substance cannot be produced. The yang has the yin as its physical substance and the yin has the yang as its nature. Nature is active but physical substance is tranquil. In heaven, yang is active while yin is tranquil, whereas in earth yang is tranquil while yin is active. When nature is given physical substance, it becomes tranquil. As physical substance follows nature, it becomes active. Hence yang is at ease with itself but yin is fast moving without control.




Confucianism / Neo Confucianism 2341 | 
Shao Yung, Supreme Principle Governing the World (Huang-Chi Ching Shu), 8B:22a, in Wing-Tsit Chan, Chinese Philosophy, Chapter 29 







A s the Great Ultimate becomes differentiated, the Two Modes (yin and yang) appear. Yang descends and interacts with yin, and yin rises to interact with yang, and consequently the Four Forms (major and minor yin and yang) are constituted. Yin and yang interact and generate the Four Forms of Heaven: the element of weakness and the element of strength interact and generate the Four Forms of Earth; and consequently the Eight Elements (heaven, water, fire, thunder, wind, water in motion, mountain, and earth) are completed. The Eight Elements intermingle and generate the myriad things. Therefore the one is differentiated into the two, two into four, four into eight, eight into sixteen, sixteen into thirty-two, and thirty-two into sixty-four. Thus it is said (in the Book of Changes) that "they are distinguished as yin and yang and the weak and the strong are employed in succession. Thus in the system of Change there are six positions and the pattern is complete. (1) Ten is divided to become 100, 1,000, and 10,000. This is similar to the fact that the root engenders the trunk; the trunk, branches; and the branches, leaves. The greater the division, the smaller the result, and the finer the division, the more complex. Taken as a unit, it is one. Taken as diffused development, it is the many.




Confucianism / Neo Confucianism 2336 | 
Shao Yung, Supreme Principle Governing the World (Huang-Chi Ching Shu), 7A:24b, in Wing-Tsit Chan, Chinese Philosophy, Chapter 29 
(1) Changes, "Remarks on Certain Trigrams," ch. 2. Cf. Legge, Yi King, p. 423.







Y ang cannot exist by itself; it can exist only when it is supported by yin. Hence yin is the foundation of yang. Similarly, yin cannot alone manifest itself; it can manifest itself only when accompanied by yang. Hence yang is the expression of yin. Yang controls the origination and enjoys the completion [of things] while yin follows the way [yang produces] and completes the work of yang.




Confucianism / Neo Confucianism 2335 | 
Shao Yung, Supreme Principle Governing the World (Huang-Chi Ching Shu), 7A: 17a, in Wing-Tsit Chan, Chinese Philosophy, Chapter 29 







Y ang is superior and spiritually powerful. Being superior, it can control the external world. Being spiritually powerful, it can preserve its unlimited efficiency. For this reason the Way creates heaven and earth and all things without showing itself. All these are patterned after the Way. Yang is the function of the Way, while yin is its substance. Yin and yang operate on each other. When yang is the function, yin becomes superior. When yin is the function, yang becomes superior.




Confucianism / Neo Confucianism 2334 | 
Shao Yung, Supreme Principle Governing the World (Huang-Chi Ching Shu), 7A: 16a, in Wing-Tsit Chan, Chinese Philosophy, Chapter 29 







T he myriad things are created and transformed out of the two material forces and the Five Agents. These Five Agents are the basis of their differentiation while the two material forces constitute their actuality. The two forces are fundamentally one. Consequently, the many are [ultimately] one and the one is actually differentiated in the many. The one and the many each has its own correct state of being. The great and the small each has its definite function.




Confucianism / Neo Confucianism 2328 | 
Chou Tun-yi, penetrating the Book of Changes, Ch.22, in Wing-Tsit Chan, Chinese Philosophy, Chapter 28 
the two material forces= Yin & Yang







H eaven produces the ten thousand things through yang and brings them to completion through yin.




Confucianism / Neo Confucianism 2325 | 
Chou Tun-yi, penetrating the Book of Changes, Ch.11, in Wing-Tsit Chan, Chinese Philosophy, Chapter 28 







B efore heaven and earth took shape, there was only undifferentiated forrmlessness. Therefore it was called the great beginning. (1) Tao originated from vacuity and vacuity produced the universe (of space and time). (2) The universe produced the material force. The material force was extremely secure. (3) That which was clear and light drifted up to become heaven, and that which was heavy and turbid solidified to form earth. It was especially easy for the clear and refined to unite but extremely difficult for the heavy and turbid to solidify. Therefore heaven was formed first and the earth became definite later. The material forces (4) of Heaven and Earth combined to form yin and yang. The concentrated forces of yin and yang became the four seasons, and the scattered forces of the four seasons became the myriad things. When the hot force of yang accumulated, fire was produced and the essence of the material force of fire became the sun. When the cold force of yin accumulated, water was produced and the essence of the material force of water became the moon. The excess of the essence of the sun and moon became the stars and planets. Heaven received the sun, moon, and stars, while earth received water and soil.




Daoism 2270 | 
Huai-nan Tzu, SPPY, 3: 1 a, in Wing-Tsit Chan, Chinese Philosophy, Chapter 17. 
(1) Read chao (light) as shih (beginning), according to Wang Nien-sun (2) According to Kao Yu, yu-chou (universe) means space (yu) and time (chou). (3) Instead of translating the Chinese phrase as "having limits" as practically all other translators have done, I have followed Kao Yu's interpretation. (4) Ching means material force, according to Kao Yu.





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