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Ramakrishna



Spiritual quotes of Ramakrishna

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K nowingly or unknowingly, consciously or unconsciously, in whatever state we utter His name, we acquire the merit of such utterance. A man who voluntarily goes into a river and bathes therein gets the benefit of the bath; so does likewise he who has been pushed into the river by another, or who while sleeping soundly has water thrown upon him by another.











G od is formless, and is with form too, and He is that which transcends both form and formlessness. He alone can say what else He is.











A s a boy begins to learn writing by drawing big scrawls, before he can master the small-hand, so we must learn concentration of the mind by fixing it first on forms; and when we have attained success therein, we can easily fix it upon the formless.











G od is the Absolute and Eternal Brahman, as well as the Father of the Universe. The indivisible Brahman is like a vast shoreless ocean, without bounds and limits, in which I can only struggle and sink. But when I approach the always sportive personal Deity (Hari), I get peace, like the sinking man who nears the shore.











A man sitting under the shade of the Kalpa-vriksha (wishing-tree) wished to be a king, and in an instant he was a king. The next moment he wished to have a charming damsel, and the damsel was instantly by his side. The man then thought within himself, if a tiger came and devoured him, and alas; in an instant he was in the jaws of a tiger! God is like that wishing-tree: whosoever in His presence thinks that he is destitute and poor, remains as such, but he who thinks and believes that the Lord fulfils all his wants, receives everything from Him.











A s fishes playing in a pond covered over with reeds and scum cannot be seen from outside, so God plays in the heart of a man invisibly, being screened by Maya from human view.











A s the lamp does not burn without oil, so man cannot live without God.











E very being is Narayana. Man or animal, sage or knave, nay, the whole universe, is Narayana, the Supreme Spirit.











G od, His scripture, and His devotee are all to be regarded as one, i.e. in one and the same light.











T he manifestation of the Divinity must be understood to be in greater degree in those who are honoured, respected, and obeyed by a large following, than in those who have gained no such influence.











I t is true that God is even in the tiger, but we must not go and face the animal. So it is true that God dwells even in the most wicked, but it is not meet that we should associate with the wicked.











O h Mother, I don’t want name and fame; I don’t want the eight occult powers; Oh Mother, I have no desire for creature comforts; Please, Mother, Grant me the boon that I may have pure love For Thy lotus feet.











I n a potter’s shop there are vessels of different shapes and forms--pots, jars, dishes, plates, etc; but all are made of one clay. So God is one, but is worshipped in different ages and climes under different names and aspects.











A s with one gold various ornaments are made, having different forms and names, so one God is worshipped in different countries and ages, and has different forms and names. Though He may be worshipped variously, some loving to call him Father, others Mother, etc, yet it is one God that is being worshipped in all these various relations and modes.











G od has revealed to me that only the Paramatman, whom the Vedas describe as the Pure Soul, is as immutable as Mount Sumeru, unattached, and beyond pain and pleasure. There is much confusion in this world of His Maya. One can by no means say that ‘this’ will come after ‘that’ or ‘this’ will produce ‘that’.











W hat Brahman is cannot be described. All things in the world — the Vedas, the Puranas, the Tantras, the six systems of philosophy — have been defiled, like food that has been touched by the tongue, for they have been read or uttered by the tongue. Only one thing has not been defiled in this way, and that is Brahman. No one has ever been able to say what Brahman is.











A s the same sugar is made into various figures of birds and beasts, so one sweet Mother Divine is worshipped in various climes and ages under various names and forms. Different creeds are but different paths to reach the Almighty.











Y ou speak of doing good to the world. Is the world such a small thing? And who are you, pray, to do good to the world? First realise God, see Him by means of spiritual discipline. If He imparts power you can do good to others; otherwise not.











A s one and the same material, viz. water, is called by different names by different people--one calling it ‘water,’ another ‘vari,’ a third ‘aqua,’ and another ‘pani’--so the one Sat-chit-ananda, the Everlasting-Intelligent- Bliss, is invoked by some as God, by some as Allah, by some as Hari, and by others as Brahman and hundreds of other names.











O nly two kinds of people can attain self-knowledge: those who are not encumbered at all with learning; that is to say, whose minds are not over-crowded with thoughts borrowed from others; and those who, after studying all the scriptures and sciences, have come to realise that they know nothing.











Y ou see many stars at night in the sky, but find them not when the sun rises. Can you say that there are no stars, then, in the heaven of day? So, O man, because you behold not the Almighty in the days of your ignorance, say not that there is no God.











I n the kingdom of God, reason, intellect and learning are of no avail. There the dumb speaks, the blind sees, and the deaf hears.











S o long as God seems to be outside and far away, so long there is ignorance. But where God is realized within, that is true knowledge.











T he sum and substance of the whole matter is that a man must love God, must be restless for Him. It doesn't matter whether you believe in God with form or God without form. You may or may not believe that God incarnates Himself as man. But you will realize Him if you have that yearning. Then He himself will let you know what He is like. If you must be mad, why should you be mad for the things of the world? If you must be mad, be mad for God alone.




Hinduism 3902 | 
Nikhilananda, 1942; p. 449 







H ow can one attain yoga? By completely renouncing attachment to worldly things. The mind must be pure and without blemish, like the telegraph wire that has no defect.




Hinduism 3901 | 
Nikhilananda, 1942; p. 375 







Y ou will feel restless for God when your heart becomes pure and your mind free from attachment to the things of the world. Then alone will your prayer reach God. A telegraph wire cannot carry messages if it has a break or some other defect.




Hinduism 3900 | 
Nikhilananda, 1942; p. 375 







D o you know how a lover of God feels? His attitude is: "0 God, Thou art the Master, and I am Thy servant. Thou art the Mother, and I am Thy child." Or again: "Thou art my Father and Mother. Thou art the Whole, and I am a part." He doesn't like to say, "I am Brahman."




Hinduism 3899 | 
Nikhilananda, 1942; p. 134 







T he path of knowledge leads to Truth, as does the path that combines knowledge and love [bhakti]. The path of love too leads to this goal. The way of love is as true as the way of knowledge. All paths ultimately lead to the same Truth. But as long as God keeps the feeling of ego in us, it is easier to follow the path of love.




Hinduism 3898 | 
Nikhilananda, 1942; p. 104 







A man does not have to suffer any more if God, in His grace, removes his doubts and reveals Himself to him. But this grace descends upon him only after he has prayed to God with intense yearning of heart and practiced spiritual discipline. The mother feels compassion for her child when she sees him running about breathlessly. She has been hiding herself; now she appears before the child.

It -is His will that we should run about a little. Then it is great fun. God has created the world in play, as it were. This is called Mahamaya, the Great Illusion. Therefore one must take refuge in the Divine Mother, the Cosmic Power Itself. It is She who has bound us with the shackles of illusion. The realization of God is possible only when those shackles are severed.





Hinduism 3897 | 
Nikhilananda, 1942; p. 116 







O ne cannot see God without purity of heart. Through attachment to "woman and gold" the mind has become stained -covered with dirt, as it were. A magnet cannot attract a needle if the needle is covered with mud. Wash away the mud and the magnet will draw it. Likewise, the dirt of the mind can be washed away with the tears of our eyes. This stain is removed if one sheds tears of repentence and says, "0 God, I shall never again do such a thing." Thereupon God, who is like the, magnet, draws to Himself the mind, which is like the needle. Then the devotee goes into samadhi and obtains the vision of God.

You may try thousands of times, but nothing can be achieved without God's grace. One cannot see God without His grace. Is it an easy thing to receive the grace of God? One must altogether renounce egotism; one cannot see God as long as one feels "I am the doer ... ... God doesn't easily appear in the heart of a man who feels himself to be his own master. But God can be seen the moment His grace descends. He is the Sun of Knowledge. One single ray of His has illumined the world with the light of knowledge. This is how we are able to see one another and acquire varied knowledge. One can see God only if He turns His light toward His own Face.





Hinduism 3896 | 
Nikhilananda, 1942; p. 173-174 







E ven after attaining samadhi, some retain the "servant ego," or the "devotee ego." The bhakta keeps this "I-consciousness." He says, "0 God, Thou art the Master and I am Thy servant; Thou art the Lord and I am Thy devotee," He feels that way even after the realization of God. His "I" -is not completely effaced. Again, by constantly practicing this kind of consciousness," one ultimately attains God...

One can attain the Knowledge of Brahman too by following the path of bhakti. God is all-powerful. He may give His devotee Brahmajnana [the knowledge of Brahman] also if He so wills. But the devotee generally doesn't seek the Knowledge of the Absolute. He would rather have the consciousness that God is the Master and he the servant, or that God is the Divine Mother and he the child.





Hinduism 3895 | 
Nikhilananda, 1942; p. 171 







T he Vedantist says, "I am He." Brahman is real and the world illusory. Even the "I" is illusory. Only the Supreme Brahman exists.




Hinduism 3894 | 
Nikhilananda, 1942; p. 181 







T he jnani--the Vedantist, for instance-always reasons, applying the process of "Not this, not this." Through this discrimination he realizes, by his inner perception, that the ego and the universe are both illusory, like a dream. Then the jnani realizes Brahman in his own consciousness.




Hinduism 3893 | 
Nikhilananda, 1942; p. 148 







I , and "mine" that is ignorance. By discriminating, you will realize that what you call "I" is really nothing but Atman [the Self].




Hinduism 3892 | 
Nikhilananda, 1942; p. 208 







M aya is nothing but the egotism of the embodied soul. This egotism has covered everything like a veil. All troubles come to an end when the ego dies. 'if by the grace of God a man but once realizes that he is not the doer, then he at once becomes a jivanmukta [a liberated being]. Though living in the body, he is liberated. He has nothing else to fear.




Hinduism 3891 | 
Nikhilananda, 1942; pp. 168-169 







T he phenomenal world belongs to that very Reality to which the Absolute belongs; again, the Absolute belongs to that very Reality to which the phenomenal world belongs. He who is realized as God has also become the universe and its living beings. One who knows the Truth knows that it is He alone who has become father and mother, child and neighbor, man and animal, good and bad, holy and unholy, and so forth.




Hinduism 3890 | 
Nikhilananda, 1942; p. 328 







B rahman is Shakti; Shakti is Brahman. They are not two. These are only two aspects, male and female, of the same Reality-Existence-Knowledge-Bliss Absolute.




Hinduism 3889 | 
Nikhilananda, 1942; p. 271 







T he implication of the story is that Brahman and the Primal Energy at first appear to be two. But after attaining the knowledge of Brahman, one does not see the two. Then there is no differentiation; it is One, without a second, Advaita-non-duality.




Hinduism 3888 | 
Nikhilananda, 1942; p. 242 







N othing exists except the One. That One is the supreme Brahman. So long as He keeps the "I" in us, He reveals to us that -it is He who, as the Primal Energy, creates, preserves, and destroys the universe.




Hinduism 3887 | 
Nikhilananda, 1942; p. 242 







H e is indeed a real man who has harmonized everything. Most people are one-sided. But I find that all opinions point to the One. All views-the Shakta, the Vaishnava, the Vedanta-have that One for their center. He who is formless is, again, endowed with form. It is He who appears in different forms. The attributeless Brahman is my Father. God with attributes is my Mother. Whom shall I blame? Whom shall I praise? The two sides of the scale are equally heavy.




Hinduism 3886 | 
Nikhilananda, 1942; p. 490 







F urther, some say that God has form and is not formless. Thus they start quarelling, ... One can speak rightly of God only after one has seen Him. He who 'has seen God knows really and truly that God has form and that He is formless as well. He has many other aspects that cannot be described.




Hinduism 3885 | 
Nikhilananda, 1942; p. 191 







T he inferior devotee says, "God exists, but He is very far off, up there in heaven." The mediocre devotee says, "God exists is in all beings as life and consciousness." The superior devotee says, "it is God Himself who has become everything; whatever I see is only a form of God. it is He alone who has become maya, the universe, and all living beings. Nothing exists but God."




Hinduism 3884 | 
Nikhilananda, 1942; p. 265 







G od is one, but His names are many.




Hinduism 3883 | 
Nikhilananda, 1942; p. 112 







S ome people indulge in quarrels, saying, "One cannot attain anything unless one worships our Krishna," or "Nothing can be gained without the worship of Kali, our Divine Mother," or "One cannot be saved without accepting the Christian religion." This is pure dogmatism. The dogmatist says, "My religion alone is true, and the religions of others are false." This is a bad attitude. God can be reached by different paths."




Hinduism 3882 | 
Nikhilananda, 1942; p. 191 







L et each man follow his own path. if he sincerely and ardently wishes to know God, peace be unto him! He will surely reach Him.




Hinduism 3881 | 
Nikhilananda, 1942; p. 35 







A ll religions- Hinduism, Islam, Christianity-and I have also followed the paths of the different Hindu sects. I have found that it is the same God toward whom all are directing their steps, though along different paths. You must try all beliefs and traverse all the different ways once.




Hinduism 3880 | 
Nikhilananda, 1942; p. 35 







W hen I think of the Supreme Being as inactive neither creating nor preserving nor destroying-, I call Him Brahman or Purusha, the Impersonal God. When I think of Him as active-creating, preserving, destroying-, I call Him Shakti or Maya or Prakriti, the Personal God. But the distinction between them does not mean a difference. The Personal and the Impersonal are the same thing, like milk and its whiteness, the diamond and its lustre, the snake and its wriggling motion. Iit is impossible to conceive of the one without the other. The Divine Mother and Brahman are one.




Hinduism 3879 | 
Nikhilananda, 1942; p. 32 







K ali is none other than He whom you call Brahman. Kali is the primal Shakti. When it is inactive, we call It Brahman. But when It has the function of creating, preserving or destroying, we call That Shakti or Kali. He whom you call Brahman, She whom I call Kali, are Do more different from each other than fire and its power of burning.




Hinduism 3878 | 
Rolland, 1952; p. 156 







W hen a seeker merges in the beatitude of samadbi, he does not perceive time and space or name and form, the offspring of maya. Whatever -is within the domain of maya is unreal. Give it up. Destroy the prison house of name and form arid rush out of it with the strength of a lion. Dive deep in search of the Self and realize It through samadhi, You will find the world of name and form vanishing into void, and the puny ego dissolving in Brahman-Consciousness. You will realize your identity with Brahman, Existence-Knowledge-Bliss Absolute.




Hinduism 3877 | 
Nikhilananda, 1942; p. 28 







B rahman is the only Reality, ever pure, ever illumined, ever free, beyond the limits of time, space, and causation. Though apparently divided by names and forms through the inscrutable power of maya, that enchantress who makes the impossible possible, Brahman is really One and undivided.




Hinduism 3876 | 
Nikhilananda, 1942; p. 28 





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