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Buddist myticism

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I nconceivable, the Buddha’s body holds within it all lands. He is present everywhere, guiding beings and teaching true Dharma.




Buddhism 7995 | 
Ch.2, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







I 59 can penetrate the future and exhaust all eons in a single thought. In a single thought I completely enter all eons of the three periods of time.




Buddhism 7994 | 
Ch.40, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 
59 “I” here refers to Samantabhadra Bodhisattva.







O n the tip of a single hair appear the lands of the Jewelled Kings. Sitting in a mote of dust, I turn the great Dharma wheel.




Buddhism 7993 | 
Book 4, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







O n the tip of an extremely fine hair, appear jewelled lands of past, present and future; lands on hair tips as numerous as dust motes in all lands of the ten directions, I58 deeply enter, adorn, and purify.




Buddhism 7992 | 
Ch.40, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 
57 ????273????????????
58 “I” here refers to Samantabhadra Bodhisattva.







T he reason for this lies in the delusion of beings who have turned their backs on enlightenment and joined with the defiling dust. Thus, the wearisome defilements come into being and mundane phenomena exist.




Buddhism 7991 | 
Book 4, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







T he union and mixture of various causes and conditions account for their illusory and false existence, and the separation and dispersion of the causes and conditions result in their illusory and false extinction.




Buddhism 7990 | 
Book 2, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







A ll beings come into being because of false interaction. Their bodies go through changes and they are caught in the temporal and spatial combinations of this world.




Buddhism 7989 | 
Book 4, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







C onfusion about falseness brings about emptiness. Relying on emptiness, worlds coming into being. Thoughts settle, forming countries. Consciousness becomes beings.




Buddhism 7988 | 
Book 6, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







Y ou cannot recover past thoughts, you cannot hold on to present thoughts, and you cannot obtain future thoughts.




Buddhism 7987 | 
Translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







A ll conditioned dharmas are like a dream, an illusion, a bubble or a shadow, Like dew or like a lightning ?ash. Contemplate them thus.




Buddhism 7986 | 
Translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







W ithin a clap or a snap of a finger there are 3.2 trillion thoughts. Each thought creates forms and each form contains consciousness. These consciousnesses and thoughts are extremely subtle and cannot be grasped.




Buddhism 7985 | 
Book 2, translated by Poh Lan Song. 







A ll countries that have outflows and all living beings are the enlightened bright wonderful mind without outflows. Seeing, hearing, awareness, and knowing are an illusory falseness brought about by the disease and its conditions.




Buddhism 7984 | 
Book 2, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







A ll conditions that bring about forms and the mind as well as dharmas pertaining to the mind and all the conditioned dharmas are manifestations of the mind only. Your bodies and your minds all appear within the wonder of the bright, true, essential, magnificent mind.




Buddhism 7983 | 
Book 2, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







A ll dharmas that arise are only manifestations of the mind. All causes and effects, the worlds as many as atoms of universe, take on substance because of the heart.




Buddhism 7982 | 
Book 1, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







C onsider the nature of earth: its coarsest aspect is the earth itself; its subtlest aspect is a mote of dust, which at its smallest would be a particle of dust bordering on emptiness. If one divided one of those particles of dust that is barely form to begin with into seven parts and then split one of those parts, emptiness itself would be arrived at.




Buddhism 7981 | 
Book 3, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







A ll the defiling objects that appear, all the illusory, ephemeral phenomena, spring up in the very spot where they also come to an end.




Buddhism 7980 | 
Book 2, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







I f world systems actually existed, that would constitute a unity of appearances. What the Thus Come One speaks of as a unity of appearances is not a unity of appearances. Therefore it is called a unity of appearances.




Buddhism 7979 | 
Translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







P ut an end to defiling dust, and unite with enlightenment, so that true suchness, the wonderful enlightened bright nature, comes into being.




Buddhism 7978 | 
Book 4, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







F rom such confused causes, the cause of confusion perpetuates itself. When one realizes that confusion has no cause , the falseness becomes baseless. Since it never arose, why would you hope for its end?




Buddhism 7977 | 
Book 4, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







C onsider the person who, because of cataracts, saw flowers in space. Once the cataracts were removed, the ?owers in space disappeared.




Buddhism 7976 | 
Book 4, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







C onfusion is groundless and ultimately empty in nature. In the past, there basically was no confusion. It merely seemed as if there were confusion and enlightenment. When the delusion about confusion and enlightenment is ended, enlightenment will not give rise to confusion.




Buddhism 7975 | 
Book 4, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







A t first there was one essential brightness, which split into a sixfold combination. If but one part ceases and returns, all six functions will stop as well.




Buddhism 7974 | 
Book 6, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







W hen our mind is under delusion, the Saddharma Pundarika Sutra ‘turns us round’. With an enlightened mind we ‘turn round’ the Sutra instead. To recite the Sutra for a considerable time without knowing its principal object indicates that you are a stranger to its meaning. The correct way to recite the Sutra is without holding any arbitrary belief. Otherwise, it is wrong. He who is above ‘Affirmative’ and ‘Negative’ rides permanently in the White Bullock Cart (the Vehicle of Buddha).




Buddhism 7973 | 
The Dharma Jewel Platform Sutra,ch.7, translated by A. F. Price and Wong Mou-Lam. 







T his is similar to a person pointing his finger at the moon to show it to someone else. Guided by the finger, the other person should see the moon. If he looks at the finger instead and mistakes it for the moon, he loses not only the moon but the finger also.




Buddhism 7972 | 
Book 2, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







A ll appearances are empty and false. If one sees all appearances as no appearances, then one sees the Thus Come One.




Buddhism 7971 | 
Translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







T herefore, creating knowledge within enlightened perception is fundamental ignorance. To be devoid of perception within enlightened perception is the non out?ow true purity of Nirvana.




Buddhism 7970 | 
Book 5, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







B ased on wonderful understanding that neither ceases to be nor comes into being, I unite with the Treasury of the Tathagata. Thus the Treasury of the Tathagata is the unique and wonderful enlightened brightness which completely illumines the Dharma Realm. That is why, within it, the one is limitless; the limitless is one. In the small appears the great; in the great appears the small.




Buddhism 7969 | 
Book 4, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







T he truly wonderful enlightened brightness is the same way. You recognize space , and space appears. Recognizing earth, water, fire, and wind, each will appear. If all are recognized, all will appear.




Buddhism 7968 | 
Book 4, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







A wareness arises because of defiling objects. Phenomena exist because of the sense organs. The phenomena and the perception are both devoid of their own natures. They support each other like intertwining reeds.




Buddhism 7967 | 
Book 5, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







E ach person regarded his physical body as being like a particle of dust blown about in the emptiness of the ten directions; sometimes visible, sometimes not, or as being like a single bubble ?oating on the clear, vast sea, appearing from nowhere and disappearing into oblivion.




Buddhism 7966 | 
Book 4, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







A s to that foremost, rare, and hard - to - understand Dharma accomplished by the Buddha— only the Buddhas and the Buddha can exhaust the Real Mark of all dharmas. That is to say with regard to all dharmas: the suchness of the marks, the suchness of the nature, the suchness of the substance, the suchness of the power, the suchness of the function, the suchness of the causes , the suchness of the conditions, the suchness of the effects , the suchness of the retributions, and the suchness of the ultimate equality from beginning to end.




Buddhism 7965 | 
Ch.2, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







A ll Dharmas are empty of characteristics. They are not produced, not destroyed56, not defiled, not pure; and they neither increase nor diminish.




Buddhism 7964 | 
Translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 
56 Non-arising, non-ceasing.







A ll mundane phenomena became the wonderfully bright primal mind of Bodhi. The essence of the mind became completely pervasive, containing the ten directions.




Buddhism 7963 | 
Book 4, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







H ow unexpected! The selfnature is originally pure in itself. How unexpected! The self-nature is originally neither produced nor destroyed55. How unexpected! The self-nature is originally complete in itself. How unexpected! The self-nature is originally without movement. How unexpected! The self-nature can produce the ten thousand dharmas.




Buddhism 7962 | 
The Dharma Jewel Platform Sutra,ch.1, translated by A. F. Price and Wong Mou-Lam. 
55 Non-arising and non-ceasing.







Y ou should know that from beginningless time all beings are continually born and continually die, simply because they do not know the everlasting true mind with its pure nature and bright substance. Instead they engage in false thinking. These thoughts are not true, and so they lead to further transmigration.




Buddhism 7961 | 
Book 1, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







I f within the true and eternal nature one seeks coming and going, confusion and enlightenment, or birth and death, one will never find them.




Buddhism 7960 | 
Book 2, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







O ur Essence of Mind which is the seed or kernel of enlightenment (Bodhi) is pure by nature, and by making use of this mind alone we can reach Buddhahood directly.




Buddhism 7959 | 
The Dharma Jewel Platform Sutra,ch.1, translated by A. F. Price and Wong Mou-Lam. 







Y et the mind is formless it cannot be grasped or perceived, but it is the unreal accumulation and arising of all dharmas which are ultimately without owner53, without I and mine54.




Buddhism 7958 | 
Translated by Saddhaloka Bhikkhu. 
53 Owner, or master.
54 Mine, or my possession.







O ne who obtains Bodhi is like a person who awakens to tell of the events in a dream; since his mind will remain awake and clear, why would he want to hold onto the things in a dream?




Buddhism 7957 | 
Book 4, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







T hus Come One does not come from anywhere nor does he go anywhere. Therefore he is called the Thus Come One.




Buddhism 7956 | 
Translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







O ne who looks for me in forms, or seeks me in sounds, practices a deviant path and will never see the Thus Come One.




Buddhism 7955 | 
Translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







O ne who adorns Buddha lands does not adorn anything. Therefore it is called adorning.




Buddhism 7954 | 
Translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







A ll the Dharma which the Thus Come One has spoken can neither be clung to nor spoken of. It is neither Dharma nor non-dharma.




Buddhism 7953 | 
Translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







A s I52 understand what the Buddha has said, there is no predetermined Dharma called Anuttara-samyaksambodhi, and there are not any predetermined Dharmas which the Thus Come One could speak.




Buddhism 7952 | 
Translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 
51 ?????????????????????????
52 “I” here refers to Venerable Subhuti, one of Sakyamuni Buddha’s great disciples and foremost in the understanding of emptiness.







F in the midst of this, one controls one’s thoughts with single- mindedness, does worthy deeds with proper demeanor, commits no evil, and performs only good, then with the merit and virtue acquired one reaches emancipation and is able to escape from this world, be reborn in heavenly realms, and finally reach Nirvana.




Buddhism 7951 | 
Translated by Hisao Inagaki. 







I t is like the towns and villages, they all depend on the great ground where they stand. All the herbs, grasses, flowers, trees, and woods also depend on the ground for their growth. With these ten wholesome ways of actions it is the same. All men and devas are established (in their human and deva nature) depending on them. The illumination of all the Shravakas, of all the Pratyekas, the way of the Bodhisattva, all Buddhadharmas they all are attained and come to fruition due to these ten wholesome great grounds.




Buddhism 7950 | 
Translated by Saddhaloka Bhikkhu. 







Y ou should know that these ten wholesome actions can lead up to the completion of the Ten Powers (of the Tathagata), of the (Four Kinds of) Fearlessness, of the Eighteen Dharmas that distinguish (the Buddha) and of all Buddhadharmas. You should therefore practice and train with diligence.




Buddhism 7949 | 
Translated by Saddhaloka Bhikkhu. 







Y ou again behold all these great Bodhisattvas of marvelous appearance, dignified and pure. All this comes into being entirely through the merit of cultivating wholesome actions. Again all the powerful ones like the eight classes of devas and dragons, and such like they also come into being because of the merits of wholesome actions.




Buddhism 7948 | 
Translated by Saddhaloka Bhikkhu. 







W hen you behold the body of the Buddha born from a hundred thousand of Kotis of merit, with all the marks adorned, the splendor of its radiance covering the whole of the great assembly.




Buddhism 7947 | 
Translated by Saddhaloka Bhikkhu. 







T he wise ones knowing this ought to cultivate wholesome actions. Through this the aggregates sense-bases and elements that will be given rise to, will all be upright and those who will see them will not grow tired of them.




Buddhism 7946 | 
Translated by Saddhaloka Bhikkhu. 





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