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Buddist myticism

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B ut others are honorable, noble, wealthy, intelligent, or clever. This is the result of good and meritorious acts of benevolence and the performance of their duties to their parents in past lives.




Buddhism 7945 | 
Translated by Hisao Inagaki. 







B y performing vegetarian offerings on behalf of deceased fathers, mothers, and other relatives while making earnest supplication on their behalf, beings of Jambudvipa benefit both the living and the dead.




Buddhism 7944 | 
Translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







H e who inflicts violence on those who are unarmed, and offends those who are inoffensive, will soon come upon one of these ten states: Sharp pain, or disaster, bodily injury, serious illness, or derangement of mind, trouble from the government, or grave charges, loss of relatives, or loss of wealth, or houses destroyed by ravaging fire; upon dissolution of the body that ignorant man is born in hell.




Buddhism 7943 | 
vv.137-140, translated by Acharya Buddharakkhita. 







I f the three karmas are not all involved, and there is perhaps just one act of killing and one of stealing, then the person must enter the Thirty-six Hells.




Buddhism 7942 | 
Book 8, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







I f the three karmas of body, mouth50, and mind commit acts of killing, stealing, and lust, the person will enter the Eighteen Hells.




Buddhism 7941 | 
Book 8, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 
50 Words







M en and women in the future may fail to do good deeds and only do evil; may not believe in cause and effect; may indulge in sexual misconduct and false speech; may use divisive and harsh speech; and may slander the Great Vehicle. Beings with karma like that should certainly fall into bad destinies.




Buddhism 7940 | 
Translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







[9]Beings who usurp or damage the property of the Eternally Dwelling, who defile Bhikshus or Bhikshunis, who commit sexual-acts within the Sangharama, or who kill or harm beings, they will fall into the Relentless Hell where for billions of eons they will seek escape in vain.




Buddhism 7939 | 
Translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







B eings who shed the Buddha’s blood, slander the Triple Jewel49, and do not venerate Sutras will fall into the Relentless Hell where for billions of eons they will seek escape in vain.




Buddhism 7938 | 
Translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 
49 The Three Jewels.







B eings who are not filial to their parents, even to the extent of harming or killing them, will fall into the Relentless Hell where for billions of eons they will seek escape in vain.




Buddhism 7937 | 
Translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







P oisonless replied. These are beings of Jambudvipa who did evil deeds. They have just died and passed through forty-nine days without any surviving relatives doing any meritorious deeds on their behalf to rescue them from their distress. Besides that, during their lives they themselves didn’t plant any good causes. Now their own karma calls forth these hells. Their first task is to cross this sea. Ten thousand yojanas east of this sea is another sea in which they will undergo twice as much suffering. East of that sea is yet another sea where the sufferings are doubled still again. What the combined evil causes of the three karmic vehicles evoke is called the sea of karma. This is that place.




Buddhism 7936 | 
Translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







A n evil person who harms a sage is like one who raises his head and spits at heaven. Instead of reaching heaven, the spittle falls back on him. It is the same with someone who throws dust against the wind. Instead of going somewhere else, the dust returns to defile his own body. The sage can not be harmed. Misdeeds will inevitably destroy the doer.




Buddhism 7935 | 
Translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







Y ou love my mind; I adore your good looks. Due to such causes and conditions we pass through hundreds of thousands of eons in sustained mutual entanglement.




Buddhism 7934 | 
Book 4, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







Y ou owe me a life; I48 must repay my debt to you. Due to such causes and conditions we pass through hundreds of thousands of eons in sustained cycle of birth and death.




Buddhism 7933 | 
Book 4, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 
47 ???????????????
48 “I” here and in the succeeding passage refers to any ordinary person.







I f while repaying his past debts46 by undergoing rebirth as an animal, such a living being pays back more than he owed, he will then be reborn as a human to rectify the excess.




Buddhism 7932 | 
Book 8, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 
46 His past karmic debts







S uppose a person eats a sheep. The sheep dies and becomes a person; the person dies and becomes a sheep. The same applies in all rebirths among the ten categories. Through death after death and birth after birth, they eat each other.




Buddhism 7931 | 
Book 4, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







A lthough each individual is reborn alone, those bound by common karma come to be born together and take revenge upon each other. So this condition persists endlessly and, until the effect of their evil karma is exhausted, there is no possibility of avoiding their enemies.




Buddhism 7930 | 
Translated by Hisao Inagaki. 







T he law of karma operates like a net stretched everywhere; in its meshes, it inevitably catches all offenders. The net woven of large and small ropes covers the whole world, from top to bottom, and those caught in it feel utterly helpless and tremble in fear. This net has been in existence from of old. How painful and heart-rending!




Buddhism 7929 | 
Translated by Hisao Inagaki. 







I n accordance with different acts of good and evil, people are destined to realms of bliss or suffering. Unalterably bound by their karma, they depart for those realms all alone. Having reached the other world, they cannot see each other. The law of good and evil naturally pursues them, and wherever they may be reborn, distance and darkness always separate them.




Buddhism 7928 | 
Translated by Hisao Inagaki. 







N ot knowing how to do good, they commit evil and do outrageous and unruly deeds. Later, they receive retribution, it is natural that they should be destined to evil realms. Demigods keep records of offenders’ acts and make sure that they are punished.




Buddhism 7927 | 
Translated by Hisao Inagaki. 







B eings should never think that minor bad deeds are unimportant or assume that they do not count as offenses. After death there will be retributions to undergo that cover all those details. Fathers and sons have the closest relationship, but their roads diverge and each must go his own way. Even if they met, neither would consent to undergo suffering in the other’s place.




Buddhism 7926 | 
Translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







G ood people do good deeds, and so enjoy pleasure after pleasure and proceed from light to greater light. Evildoers commit crimes, and so suffer pain after pain and wander from darkness to deeper darkness.




Buddhism 7925 | 
Translated by Hisao Inagaki. 







W hen wealthy and prosperous, they are happy and do not learn to be modest and virtuous . Consequently, their pomp and power are short-lived; when these are exhausted, they must undergo further afflictions. Their sufferings are bound to increase in time to come.




Buddhism 7924 | 
Translated by Hisao Inagaki. 







S uch is retribution in this world, but in the lives to come, punishment is longer and more severe for such evildoers. The suffering of transmigration through dark and dismal realms is comparable to the severest and most painful punishment ever enforced by law.




Buddhism 7923 | 
Translated by Hisao Inagaki. 







T he power of karma is extremely great. It rivals Mount Sumeru in its heights. It surpasses the great oceans in its depth. It obstructs the path leading to Sagehood. For that reason, beings should never think that minor bad deeds are unimportant or assume that they do not count as offenses. After death there will be retributions to undergo that cover all those details.




Buddhism 7922 | 
Translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







P eople commit nothing but evil and fail to cultivate roots of virtue, and so it is natural that they all go to evil realms.




Buddhism 7921 | 
Translated by Hisao Inagaki. 







K illing, stealing, and lust are the basic roots. From such causes and conditions comes the continuity of karma and retribution.




Buddhism 7920 | 
Book 4, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







T hese living beings, who do not recognize the fundamental mind, all undergo rebirth for limitless kalpas. They do not attain true purity, because they keep getting involved in killing, stealing, and lust, or because they counter them and are born according to their not killing, not stealing, and lack of lust. If these three karmas are present in them, they are born among the troops of ghosts. If they are free of these three karmas, they are born in the destiny of gods.




Buddhism 7919 | 
Book 9, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







I t may be ill with the doer of good as long as the good ripens not. But when it does ripen, then the doer of good sees (the pleasant results of) his good deeds.




Buddhism 7918 | 
v.120, translated by Acharya Buddharakkhita. 







I t may be well with the evil-doer as long as the evil ripens not. But when it does ripen, then the evildoer sees (the painful results of) his evil deeds.




Buddhism 7917 | 
v.119, translated by Acharya Buddharakkhita. 







T ruly, an evil deed committed does not immediately bear fruit, like milk that does not turn sour all at once. But smoldering, it follows the fool like fire covered by ashes.




Buddhism 7916 | 
v.71, translated by Acharya Buddharakkhita. 







M ind precedes all mental states. Mind is their chief; they are all mind-wrought. If with a pure mind a person speaks or acts happiness follows him like his never-departing shadow.




Buddhism 7915 | 
v.2, translated by Acharya Buddharakkhita. 







M ind precedes all mental states. Mind is their chief; they are all mindwrought. If with an impure mind a person speaks or acts suffering follows him like the wheel that follows the foot of the ox.




Buddhism 7914 | 
v.1, translated by Acharya Buddharakkhita. 







B ut the man whom the wise praise, after observing him day after day, is one of flawless character, wise, and endowed with knowledge and virtue.




Buddhism 7913 | 
v.229, translated by Acharya Buddharakkhita. 







F or all the evil deeds I45 have done in the past, created by my body, mouth, and mind, from beginningless greed, anger, and delusion, I now know shame and repent them all.




Buddhism 7912 | 
Ch.40, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 
44 ???????????
45 “I” here refers to Samantabhadra Bodhisattva.







D o not conceal your faults or put on a special appearance to delude the multitudes.




Buddhism 7911 | 
Translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







I f a person has many offenses and does not repent of them, but cuts off all thought of repentance, the offenses will engulf him, just as water returning to the sea will gradually become deeper and wider. If a person has offenses and, realizing they are wrong, reforms and does good, the offenses will dissolve by themselves, just as a sick person who begins to perspire will gradually be cured.




Buddhism 7910 | 
Translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







M oreover, Universally Expansive, beings in the future may, while dreaming or drowsy, see ghosts, spirits, and other forms that are either sad, weeping, or worried, fearful, or terrified. Those are all fathers, mothers, sons, daughters, brothers, sisters, husbands, wives, and relatives from one, ten, a hundred, or a thousand lives past who have not yet been able to leave the bad destinies. They have no place from which to hope for the power of blessings to rescue them, and so they try to communicate with their closest descendants, hoping that those relatives will use some skillful means to help them get out of the Evil Paths. Universally Expansive, using your spiritual powers, exhort those descendants to recite this Sutra with sincere resolve before the images of Buddhas or Bodhisattvas or to request others to recite it, either three or seven times. When the Sutra has been read aloud the proper number of times, relatives in the Evil Paths will obtain liberation and never again be seen by those who are dreaming or drowsy.




Buddhism 7909 | 
Translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







T he Buddha told Lord Yama, “The beings of Jambudvipa have stubborn and obstinate natures, difficult to tame, difficult to subdue. This Great Bodhisattva continually rescues such beings throughout hundreds of thousands of eons and causes them to obtain liberation quickly. For those beings undergoing retributions even in the worst destinies, the Bodhisattva applies the strength of expedients to extricate them from their own basic karmic conditions and lead them to understand the events of their past lives. But because beings of Jambudvipa are so bound by their own heavy bad habits, they keep revolving in and out of the various paths over and over as this Bodhisattva labors throughout many long eons to entirely effect their rescue and release.”




Buddhism 7908 | 
Translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







W hen men or women laden with offenses who failed to plant good causes die, even they can receive one-seventh of any merit dedicated to them by relatives who do good deeds on their behalf. The other six-sevenths of the merit will return to the living relatives who did the good deeds. It follows that men and women of the present and future who cultivate while they are strong and healthy will receive every portion of the benefit derived.




Buddhism 7907 | 
Translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







A ll tremble at violence; all fear death. Putting oneself in the place of another, one should not kill nor cause another to kill.




Buddhism 7906 | 
v.129, translated by Acharya Buddharakkhita. 







I f those who hold the name of Gwan Shr Yin Bodhisattva should fall into a great fre, the fre will not burn them, because of Gwan Shr Yin Bodhisattva’s awesome spiritual power. If they are being tossed about in deep and treacherous waters and call his name, they will quickly reach the shallows.




Buddhism 7905 | 
Universal Door Chapter of the Lotus Sutra, translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







H e upholds the Tathagata’s profound Dharma-treasury and protects the seeds of Buddhahood, so that they may continue to multiply.




Buddhism 7904 | 
Translated by Hisao Inagaki. 







H e indeed looks upon sentient beings as his own self. With such roots of virtue, all the bodhisattvas in the assembly had reached the shore of emancipation.




Buddhism 7903 | 
Translated by Hisao Inagaki. 







H aving obtained the eye of wisdom, I43 will remove the darkness of ignorance; I will block all the evil paths. And open the gate to the good realms.




Buddhism 7902 | 
Translated by Hisao Inagaki. 







H aving awakened great compassion for sentient beings, he kindly expounds the teaching, and endows them with the Dharmaeye. He blocks the paths to the three evil realms, opens the gate of virtue and, without waiting for their request, provides beings with the Dharma.




Buddhism 7901 | 
Translated by Hisao Inagaki. 







W ithout being asked to do so, he becomes a good friend to each within the multitude of beings and carries their heavy karmic burdens on his back.




Buddhism 7900 | 
Translated by Hisao Inagaki. 







O nce awakened, they even more energetically continue to cultivate the Path. Steeping themselves in kindness and compassion, they grow in wisdom. They sail the Dharma ship across to Nirvana’s shore, and then return on the sea of birth and death to rescue living beings.




Buddhism 7899 | 
Translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







T he Kingdom of Buddha is in this world, within which enlightenment is to be sought. To seek enlightenment by separating from this world is as absurd as to search for a rabbit’s horn. Right views are called ‘transcendental’; erroneous views are called ‘worldly’. When all views, right or erroneous, are discarded then the essence of Bodhi appears.




Buddhism 7898 | 
The Dharma Jewel Platform Sutra,ch.2, translated by A. F. Price and Wong Mou-Lam. 







I f a Bodhisattva comprehends the dharma of no self, the Thus Come One calls him a true Bodhisattva.




Buddhism 7897 | 
Translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 







Y ou should be mindful of the four elements within the body. Though each has a name, none of them is the self. Since they are not the self, they are like an illusion.




Buddhism 7896 | 
Translated by the Buddhist Text Translation Society. 





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