Inter -  Faiths  Dialogue



Interreligious dialogue : The Saints > Oneness

Onelittleangel > The Saints > Oneness
138  quote(s)  | Page 1 / 3





T hose who see all creatures within themselves
And themselves in all creatures know no fear.
Those who see all creatures in themselves
And themselves in all creatures know no grief.
How can the multiplicity of life
Delude the one who sees its unity?





Hinduism 4316 | 
Isha Upanishad 6-7 







N ow are for us no entanglements or snares,
Nor a bit of egoism left.
Now is all distance annulled, nor are curtains drawn between us.
Thou art mine, I Thine.





Sikhism 4312 | 
Bilaval, M.5, p. 821 







M editate upon him and transcend physical consciousness. Thus will you
reach union with the Lord of the universe. Thus will you become
identified with him who is One without a second. In him all your desires
will find fulfillment.

The truth is that you are always united with the Lord. But you must know
this.





Hinduism 4309 | 
Svetasvatara Upanishad 1.11-12 







T hat disciplined man
with joy and light within,
Becomes one with God
and reaches the freedom that is God's.





Hinduism 4289 | 
Bhagavad Gita 5.24 







H e in whom desire has been stilled suffers no rebirth. After death, having attained to the highest, desiring only the Self, he goes to no other world. Realizing Brahman, he becomes Brahman.

Freed from the body, he becomes one with the immortal spirit, Brahman, the Light eternal.





Hinduism 4244 | 
Brihadaranyaka Upanishad 4.4.6-7 







T he infinite joy of touching the Godhead is easily attained by those who are free from the burden of evil and established within themselves. They see the Self in every creature and all creation in the Self. With consciousness unified through meditation, they see everything with an equal eye.

I am ever present into those who have realized Me in every creature. Seeing all life as My manifestation, they are never separated from Me. They worship Me in the hearts of all, and all their actions proceed from Me. Wherever they may live, they abide in Me.

When a person responds to the joys and sorrows of others as if they were his own, he has attained the highest state of spiritual union.





Hinduism 4204 | 
Bhagavad Gita 6.28-32 







T his world of men, given over to the idea of "I am the agent," bound up with the idea "another is the agent," understand not truly this thing; they have not seen it as a thorn. For one who looks at this thorn with caution, the idea "I am the agent" exists not, the idea "another is the agent" exists not.




Buddhism 4158 | 
Udana 70 







A s long as there is duality, one sees "the other," one hears "the other," one smells "the other," one speaks to "the other," one thinks of "the other," one knows "the other"; but when for the illumined soul the all is dissolved in the Self, who is there to be seen by whom, who is there to be smelled by whom, who is there to be heard by whom, who is there to be spoken to by whom, who is there to be thought of by whom, who is there to be known by whom? Ah, Maitreyi, my beloved, the Intelligence which reveals all--by what shall it be revealed? By whom shall the Knower be known? The Self is described as "not this, not that" (neti, neti). It is incomprehensible, for it cannot be comprehended; undecaying, for it never decays; unattached, for it never attaches itself; unbound, for it is never bound. By whom, O my beloved, shall the Knower be known?




Hinduism 4113 | 
Bhrihadaranyaka Upanishad 4.5.15 







R eturn to the origin and keep to the origin.




Daoism 4040 | 
commentary on the Tao Te King, 19, trad. E.Erkes, p.41 







H e perceives the oneness of everything, does not know about duality in it.




Daoism 4039 | 
Zhuangzi, chap.12 (Huang Lao school), trad. A.C. Graham, p.186 







V anishingly (mingran), forming a oneness with creation.




Daoism / Neo Daoism 4036 | 
ZZJS, 129, trad. B. Ziporyn, 2003, p.69 
see also "vanishingly embodying all things”, ZZJS, 195, trad. B. Ziporyn, 2003, p.69 ; “vanishingly forming a oneness with one’s own time.”, ZZJS, 184, trad. B. Ziporyn, 2003, p.69







F ollowing the pathway and uniting with the ultimate, it is therefore called root of Heaven and Earth.




Daoism 4035 | 
commentary on the Tao Te King, 6.1, trad. P.J. Lin, 1977, p.13 







U nknown even to my ears, eyes, body, I do not know how to name it; thus it cannot be investigated further, but merges together to make one.




Daoism 4028 | 
commentaire du D.D.J., 14.1, trad. P.J. Lin, 1977, p.24 







B y cultivating one’s nature (?), one will return to virtue (?). When virtue is perfect, one will be one with the beginning (?), one become vacuous (?), one become great.




Daoism 4022 | 
Zhuangzi, chap.22 (shool of Tchuang Tzu), trad. W.T. Chang, 1969, p.202 







T he phenomenal world belongs to that very Reality to which the Absolute belongs; again, the Absolute belongs to that very Reality to which the phenomenal world belongs. He who is realized as God has also become the universe and its living beings. One who knows the Truth knows that it is He alone who has become father and mother, child and neighbor, man and animal, good and bad, holy and unholy, and so forth.




Hinduism 3890 | 
Nikhilananda, 1942; p. 328 







W hen a seeker merges in the beatitude of samadbi, he does not perceive time and space or name and form, the offspring of maya. Whatever -is within the domain of maya is unreal. Give it up. Destroy the prison house of name and form arid rush out of it with the strength of a lion. Dive deep in search of the Self and realize It through samadhi, You will find the world of name and form vanishing into void, and the puny ego dissolving in Brahman-Consciousness. You will realize your identity with Brahman, Existence-Knowledge-Bliss Absolute.




Hinduism 3877 | 
Nikhilananda, 1942; p. 28 







O scholars, you are mistaken; there's no creator or creation there [in the experience of Unity].
There's no radiant form, no time, no word, no flesh, or faith; no cause or effect, or even a thought of the Vedas.
There's no Hari or Brahma, no Shiva or Shakti, no pilgrimages or rituals;
There is no mother, no father, no Guru; think! Is it two or is It One?
Kabir says: If you understand this, you are the teacher and I am the disciple.





Others Beliefs / Litterature 3856 | 
Bijak, Sabda 43 







R ama has possessed me; Hari has enchanted me! All my doubts have flown like migratory birds in winter.
When I was mad with pride, the Beloved did not speak to me;
But when I put on the robe of humility, the Master opened my inner eye,
Dyeing every pore of my body in the color of love.
Drinking the elixir from the cup of my emptied heart, I slept on His bed in divine ecstasy.
The devotee meets Hari as gold meets a gold-solvent-, the pure heart melts into its Lord.





Others Beliefs / Litterature 3855 | 
Bijak, Shastri, 1941;p.37 







H aving been made one with God, the soul is somehow God through participation. Although it is not God as perfectly as it will be in the next life, it is like the shadow of God. Being the shadow of God through this substantial transformation, it performs in this measure in God and through God what He, through Himself, does in it. For the will of the two is one will, and thus God's operation and the soul's is one. (1)

... When there is union of love, the image of the Beloved is so sketched in the will and drawn so vividly, that it is true to say that the Beloved lives in the lover and the lover in the Beloved. Love produces such likeness in this transformation of lovers that one can say each is the other and both are one. The reason is, that in the union and transformation of love, each gives possession of self to the other, and each leaves and exchanges self for the other. Thus each one lives in the other and is the other, and both are one in the transformation of love. (2)

...Thus, no one ... can disturb the soul that is liberated and purged of all things and united with God. She enjoys now in this state a habitual sweetness and tranquility which is never lost or lacking to her. (3)





Christianity / Catholicism 3847 | 
(1) The Living Flame Of Love, III.78, Kavanaugh & Rodriguez, 1973; p. 641 ; (2) Spiritual Canticle, 12 :7; Kavanaugh & Rodriguez, 1973; p. 455 ; (3) Spiritual Canticle, 24 :5; Kavanaugh & Rodriguez, 1973; p. 503 







W hat God communicates to the soul in this intimate union is totally beyond words. One can say nothing about it just as one can say nothing about God Himself that resembles Him. For in the transformation of the soul in God, it is God who communicates Himself with admirable glory. In this transformation, the two become one, as we would say of the window united with the ray of sunlight, or of the coal with the fire, or of the starlight with the light of the Sun. (1)

... The soul thereby becomes divine, becomes God, through participation, insofar as is possible in this life. ... The union wrought between the two natures, and the communication of the divine to the human in this state is such that even though neither changes their being, both appear to be God. (2)





Christianity / Catholicism 3846 | 
(1) Spiritual Canticle, 26:4; Kavanaugh & Rodriguez, 1973; p. 512 ; (2) Spiritual Canticle, 22 :3-4; Kavanaugh & Rodriguez, 1973; p. 497 







I n the same way, no one can hinder this man, for he intends and seeks and takes delight in nothing but God, for God has become one with the man in all his intention. And so, just as no multiplicity can disturb God, nothing can disturb or fragment this man, for he is one in that One where all multiplicity is one and is one multiplicity.




Christianity 3814 | 
Treatise A. 1, Colledge & McGinn, 1982, p. 211 







T he eye by which I see God is the same as the eye by which God sees me. My eye and God's eye are one and the same-one in seeing, one in knowing, and one in loving.




Christianity 3810 | 
Sermon 23, Blackney, 1941; p. 206 







S ome simple people think that they will see God as if He were standing there and they here. It is not so. God and I, we are one. (1)

I am converted into Him in such a way that He makes me one Being with Himself-not a similar being. By the living God, it is true that there is no distinction ! (2)





Christianity 3809 | 
(1) Sermon 6, Colledge & McGinn, 1982.; p. 188 ; (2) Sermon 18, Blackney, 1941; p. 181 







A s the soul becomes more pure and bare and poor, and possesses less of created things, and is emptied of all things that are not God, it receives God more purely, and is more completely in Him; and it truly becomes one with God, and it looks into God and God into it, face to face as it were; two images transformed into one.




Christianity 3808 | 
Treatise A.2, Colledge & McGinn, 1982; p. 222 







F inal and perfect happiness can consist in nothing else than the vision of the Divine Essence. ... For perfect happiness the intellect needs to reach the very Essence of the First Cause. And thus it will have its perfection through union with God ... in which alone man's happiness consists, as stated above.




Christianity / Catholicism 3807 | 
Summa Theologia, II.1.8 







I f there is any lover in the world, 0 Muslim, it is I.
If there is any believer, infidel, or Christian hermit, it is I.
The wine, the cup-bearer, the musician, the instrument and the music,
The beloved, the candle, the liquor and the inebriation, it is I.
The seventy-two religious sects in the world
Do not really exist;
I swear by God every religious sect-it is I.
Earth, air, water and fire: do you know what they are?
Earth, air, water and fire-and the soul as well; it is I
Truth and falsehood, good and evil, pleasure and suffering, beginning and end,
Knowledge, learning, asceticism, devotion and faith-it is I.
Be assured that the fire of hell and its flames,
Paradise, Eden and the angels of heaven-it is I.
Heaven and earth and all they hold: angels, demons, and men - it is I.





Islam / Sufism 3799 | 
Mathnawi; Winfield, 1898 







D on't laugh like children! You do not understand my state.
Read a chapter from me, unfold a secret from her [the creative Force]:
I am drunk of that wine forbidden by the lawgivers;
I am drunk of the wine of oneness; I am free of color and smell.
I am oblivious to this place; my mind is elsewhere;





Islam / Sufism 3798 | 
Divan-i Shams; Winfield, 1898 







I sought solitude with my loved one,
Yet find there is no one here but myself.
And if there were a "someone else," then, truly,
I should not have attained her.

When I clutched at His skirt,
I found His hand in my sleeve.

I am the one I love;
He whom I love is I.
Two, yet residing in a single body.

If I have become the Beloved,
Who is the lover?
Beloved, Love and lover-three in one;
There is no place for union here,
So, what is this talk of "separation?"

What He takes,
He takes with His own hand from Himself;
What He gives,
He gives from Himself to Himself.

Hunter, prey, bait, and trap;
Candle, candlestick, flame, and moth;
Beloved, lover, soul, and soul's desire;
Inebriation, drinker, wine, and cupAll is He!

Is it You or I this reality in the eye?
Beware, beware of the word, "two."

"I" and "You" have made of man a duality;
Without these words, You are I and I am You.





Islam / Sufism 3791 | 
in Chittock & Wilson, 1982; pp. 95,117,125,76,96,110,77,103 







W hen the mystery of the oneness of the soul and the Divine is revealed to you, you will understand that you are no other than God. ... Then you will see all your actions to be His actions and all your attributes to be His attributes and your essence to be His essence.

... Thus, instead of [your own] essence, there is the essence of God and in place of [your own] attributes, there are the attributes of God. He who knows himself sees his whole existence to be the Divine existence, but does not experience that any change has taken place in his own nature or qualities. For when you know yourself, your sense of a limited identity vanishes, and you know that you and God are one and the same.





Islam / Sufism 3778 | 
in Landau, 1959; pp. 83-84 







T hou art One, the first of every number, and the Foundation of all structure. Thou art One, and in the mystery of the Unity all the wise in heart are astonished; for they can not define it. Thou art One, and Thy unity can neither be lessened nor augmented; for nothing is there wanting or superfluous. Thou art One, but not such a One as is numbered; for neither plurality nor change, nor form, nor physical attribute, nor name expressive of Thy nature, can reach Thee…




Judaism 3768 | 
The Royal Crown; Zangwill, 1923, 1974; pp. 82-88 







S ometimes it will seem to you that you are a part of it by reason of your connection with corporeal substance; and sometimes you will think you are all [forms], and that there is no difference between you and them, on account of the union of your being with their being, and the consubstantiality of your form and their forms...

When you have raised yourself to [awareness of] the first universal matter ... and fathomed its shadowy nature, then you will see the Wonder of wonders. Therefore, pursue this diligently and with love, because this is the purpose of the existence of the human soul, and in this is great delight and extreme happiness.





Judaism 3767 | 
Fons Vitae, III.204 







W hen no offence is offered by them, they are as if non-existent;
When the mind is not disturbed, it is as if there is no mind.
The subject is quieted as the object ceases;
The object ceases as the subject is quieted.

The object is an object for the subject;
The subject is a subject for an object.
Know that the relativity of the two
Rests ultimately on the oneness of the Void.

In the oneness of the Void, the two are one,
And each of the two contains in itself all the ten thousand things.
When no discrimination is made between this and that,
How can a one-sided and prejudiced view arise?





Buddhism / Mahayana / Zen (Chan) 3759 | 
Hsin-hsin ming “Inscription on the Self of the Self”, Suzuki, 1960, pp. 76-82 







W hen oneness is not thoroughly understood,
In two ways loss may be sustained:
The denial of the world may lead to its absolute negation,
While the denying of the
Void may result in the denying of your [true] Self.





Buddhism / Mahayana / Zen (Chan) 3756 | 
Hsin-hsin ming “Inscription on the Self of the Self”, Suzuki, 1960, pp. 76-82 







T he Truth is perfect like the vastness of space,
With nothing wanting, nothing superfluous;
It is indeed due to making choices
That the One Reality is lost sight of.

Pursue not the outer entanglements,
Dwell not in the inner Void;
When the mind rests serene in the oneness of 'things,
Dualism vanishes by itself.





Buddhism / Mahayana / Zen (Chan) 3754 | 
Hsin-hsin ming “Inscription on the Self of the Self”, Suzuki, 1960, pp. 76-82 







T o some, the Self appears as "other";
To me, the Self is 'I'
Like undivided space,
One alone exists.
How, then, could the subject and object of meditation be two?





Hinduism 3724 | 
#39, Reprinted from Abhayananda, S., Dattatreya: The Song Of The Avadhut, Olympia, Wash., Atma Books, 1992 







W hen you know all this universe of forms
To be as vacant as the sky,
Then you'll know Brahman;
Duality will forever cease to be.





Hinduism 3723 | 
#38, Reprinted from Abhayananda, S., Dattatreya: The Song Of The Avadhut, Olympia, Wash., Atma Books, 1992 







W hen ajar is broken, the space that was inside
Merges into the space outside.
In the same way, my mind has merged in God;
To me, there appears no duality.





Hinduism 3720 | 
#31, Reprinted from Abhayananda, S., Dattatreya: The Song Of The Avadhut, Olympia, Wash., Atma Books, 1992 







T ruly, it is by the grace of God
That the knowledge of Unity arises within.





Hinduism 3705 | 
#1, Reprinted from Abhayananda, S., Dattatreya: The Song Of The Avadhut, Olympia, Wash., Atma Books, 1992 







W hen the bliss of Consciousness is attained, there is the lasting acquisition of that state in which Consciousness is one's only Self, and in which all that appears is identical with Consciousness. Even the body is experienced as identical with Consciousness. (1)

... Awareness of the perceiver and the perceived is common to all beings. But with Self-realized yogis it is different; they are aware of them as one.





Hinduism / Tantra 3687 | 
(1) Kshemaraj, Pratyabijnahridayam ; (2) Vijnanabhairava 







D ay after day, let the yogi practice the stilling of the mind, in a secret place, in deep seclusion, master of his thoughts, hoping for nothing, desiring nothing. Let him find a place that is pure and a pose that is restful... In that place let him rest and practice yoga for the purification of the soul; with his mind and prana [vital energy] stilled, let him be silent before the One.

With his soul in peace, and all fear gone, and firm in the vow of purity, let him hold his mind steady, focusing his intention on Me, the supreme Lord. When the mind of the yogi is steady, and finds rest in the Spirit, when all restless desires have vanished, then he is a yukta, one who has attained yoga. ... Then he knows the joy of eternity; he sees with his mind far beyond what the senses can see. He remains steady in the Truth, unmoving. ... This supreme joy comes to the yogi whose heart is still, whose passions have found rest; he is free from all sin, and is one with Brahman.





Hinduism 3684 | 
6:10-28 







O ne becomes intoxicated and enthralled, continually immersed in the inherent bliss of the Self.

This love is not the same as worldly love; by its very nature, divine love turns away from all worldly love. By "turns away," I mean that all one's intention is "turned toward" God. This leads to union with God, and indifference toward all else. Union with God is attained by giving up all other supports.





Hinduism 3677 | 
7-9 







D o thou, dear Timothy, in the diligent exercise of mystical contemplation, leave behind the senses and the operations of the intellect, and all things sensible and intellectual, and all things in the world of being and non-being, that thou mayest arise by unknowing towards the union, as far as is attainable, with Him who transcends all being and all knowledge. For by the unceasing and absolute renunciation of thyself and of all things, thou mayest be borne on high, through pure and entire self-abnegation, into the superessential radiance of the divine Darkness.




Christianity 3673 | 
Mystical Theology, I.; Editors of The Shrine Of Wisdom, 1965; P. 10 







T he higher we soar in contemplation, the more limited become our expressions of that which is purely intelligible; even as now, when plunging into the Darkness which is above the intellect, we pass not merely into brevity of speech, but even into absolute silence, of thoughts as well as of words ... and, according to the degree of transcendence, so our speech is restrained until, the entire ascent being accomplished, we become wholly voiceless, inasmuch as we are absorbed in Him who is totally ineffable.




Christianity 3672 | 
Mystical Theology, III.; Editors of The Shrine Of Wisdom, 1965; P. 14 







S uppose the soul have attained; the Highest has come to her, or rather has revealed Its presence; she has turned away from all about her and has made herself apt, beautiful to the utmost, brought into likeness [with the Divine] by the preparings and adornings known to those growing ready for the vision. She has seen that Presence suddenly manifesting within her, for there is nothing between, nor are they any longer two, but one; for so long as the Presence remains, all distinction fades. It is in this way that lover and beloved here [in this world], in a copy of that [Divine] union, long to blend their being.




Philosophy / Néoplatonism 3668 | 
Enneads, 38:6:34; in Porphyry, Life Of Plotinus, Turnbull, 1936; p. 203 







W e ought not to question whence it [the experience of Unity] comes; there is no whence, no coming or going in place; it either appears [to us] or does not appear. We must not run after it, but we must fit ourselves for the vision and then wait tranquilly for it as the eye waits on the rising of the Sun which in its own time appears above the horizon and gives itself to our sight




Philosophy / Néoplatonism 3667 | 
Enneads, 32:5:8; in Porphyry, Life Of Plotinus, Turnbull, 1936; p. 165 







T here, our Self-seeing is a communion with the Self, restored to purity. No doubt we should not speak of "seeing," but, instead of [speaking of] "seen" and "seer," speak boldly of a simple unity. For in this seeing we neither see, nor distinguish, nor are there, two. The man is changed, no longer himself nor belonging to himself; he is merged with the Supreme, sunken into It, one with It; it is only in separation that duality exists. This is why the vision baffles telling; for how could a man bring back tidings of the Supreme as something separate from himself when he has seen It as one with himself?




Philosophy / Néoplatonism 3664 | 
Enneads, 9:6: 10; in Porphyry, Life Of Plotinus, Turnbull, 1936; p. 221 







I n this state of absorbed contemplation, there is no longer any question of holding an object in view; the vision is such that seeing and seen are one; object and act of vision have become identical




Philosophy / Néoplatonism 3663 | 
Enneads, 38:6:35; in Porphyry, Life Of Plotinus, Turnbull, 1936; p. 204 







O nce we know our own soul rising still higher, we sing the divinity of the Mind [which produced it], and above all these, the mighty King of that dominion (the Absolute), who, while remaining as He is, yet creates that multitude, all dependent on Him, existing by Him and from Him.

... In advancing stages of contemplation, rising from contemplation of Nature, to that in the soul, and thence again to that in the divine Mind, the object contemplated becomes progressively a more and more intimate possession of the contemplating being, more and more one with them.

... In the divine Mind itself, there is complete identity of knower and known, no distinction existing between being and knowing, contemplation and its object, [but] constituting a living thing, a one Life, two inextricably one.





Philosophy / Néoplatonism 3660 | 
Plotinus, Enneads, 30:3:8; in Porphyry, Life Of Plotinus, Turnbull, 1936; pp. 113-114 







A ll that is, He contains within Himself like thoughts: the world, Himself, the All. Therefore, unless you make yourself equal to God, you cannot understand God; for like is not intelligible save to the like. Make yourself grow to a greatness beyond measure; by a leap [of intellect], free yourself from the body; raise yourself above all time, become Eternity; then you will understand God.

Believe that nothing is impossible for you; think yourself immortal and capable of understanding all, all arts, all sciences, the nature of every living being. Mount higher than the highest height; descend lower than the lowest depth. Draw into yourself all sensations of everything created, fire and water, the dry and the moist, imagining that you are everywhere, on earth, in the sea, in the sky; that you are not yet born, in the maternal womb, adolescent, old, dead, beyond death. If you embrace in your thought all things at once-all times, places, substances, qualities, quantities-you may understand God.





Christianity / Gnostics 3648 | 
Poimander, 1.11, based on translation by Yates, F., 1964, pp. 31-32 







T he true lover of knowledge is always striving after Being-that is his nature; he will not rest at those multitudinous particular phenomena whose existence is in appearance only, but will go on-the keen edge will not be blunted, nor the force of his passion abate until he have attained the knowledge of the true nature of all essence by a sympathetic and kindred power in the soul. And by that power, drawing near and becoming one with very Being, ... he will know and truly live and increase. Then, and only then, will he cease from his travail.




Philosophy / Platonism 3638 | 
Republic, 490A-B; Jowett 





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