Inter -  Faiths  Dialogue



Interreligious dialogue : The Saints > Oneness

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I n this experience of Unity, the yogi is liberated, delivered from all suffering forever .... The yogi whose heart is still, whose passions are dissolved, and who is pure of sin, experiences this supreme bliss and knows his oneness with Brahman.




Hinduism 3607 | 
6:23-27; based on Mascaro, Juan, 1962 







W hen the mind of the yogi is in peace, focused on the Self within, and beyond all restless desires, then he experiences Unity.
His mind becomes still, like the flame of a lamp sheltered from the winds.
When the mind rests in the prayerful stillness of yoga, by the grace of the One, he knows the One, and attains fulfillment.
Then he knows the joy of Eternity; he sees beyond the intellect and the senses. He becomes the Unmoving, the Eternal





Hinduism 3606 | 
6:18-21; based on Mascaro, Juan, 1962 







W hen a man knows himself to be Brahman, his reason is steady, and all delusion is gone from him.
When pleasures come, he is not moved; and when pain comes, he is unmoved.
He is not bound by things without; within himself he enjoys happiness.
His soul is one with Brahman, and so he enjoys eternal bliss.





Hinduism 3605 | 
5:20-21; based on Mascaro, Juan, 1962 







H e is seen by a pure heart and by a mind whose thoughts are pure.
... When all desires that cling to the heart are surrendered, then a mortal becomes immortal, and even in this world he is one with Brahman.





Hinduism 3597 | 
Katha Upanishad, IV ; based on Mascaro, Juan, 1965 







W hen a man has seen the truth of the Spirit, he is one with Him; the aim of his life is fulfilled, and he is ever beyond sorrow.

... When a man knows God, he is free; his sorrows have an end, and birth and death are no more. When in inner union he is beyond the world of the body, then the third world, the world of the Spirit, is found, where man possesses all-for he is one with the ONE.





Hinduism 3595 | 
Svetasvatara Upanishad, II,1; based on Mascaro, Juan, 1965 







W hen a sage sees this great Unity, and realizes that his Self has become all beings, what delusion and what sorrow could ever approach him?




Hinduism 3593 | 
Isha Upanishad, 1.7; based on Mascaro, Juan, 1965 







T herefore the sage embraces the One
And becomes the model of the world.





Daoism 3539 | 
Laozi 22, in Wing-Tsit Chan, Chinese Philosophy, Chapter 7. 







C an you keep the spirit and embrace the One without departing from them?




Daoism 3538 | 
Laozi 10, in Wing-Tsit Chan, Chinese Philosophy, Chapter 7. 







Y ou should know (God) without image, unmediated and without likeness. But if I am to know God without mediation in such a way, then "I" must become "he", and "he" must become "I". More precisely I say: God must become me and I must become God, so entirely one that "he" and this "I" become one "is" and act in this "isness" as one, for this "he" and this "I", that is God and the soul, are very fruitful.




Christianity 3535 | 
Selected Writings. Trans. Oliver Davies. New York: Penguin Books USA, Inc., 1994, p. 238 







I n return for stripping myself of myself for his sake, God will be wholly my own possession with all that he is and can do, as much mine as his, no more and no less. He will belong to me a thousand times more than anything ever belonged to anyone which they keep in their chest, or than he was ever his own possession. Nothing was ever my own as much as God will be mine, together with all that he is and all that he can do.




Christianity 3527 | 
Selected Writings. Trans. Oliver Davies. New York: Penguin Books USA, Inc., 1994, p. 48 







T his secret union takes place in the deepest centre of the soul, which must be where God Himself dwells, and I do not think there is any need of a door by which to enter it. I say there is no need of a door because all that has so far been described seems to have come through the medium of the senses and faculties… But what passes in the union of the Spiritual Marriage is very different. The Lord appears in the centre of the soul, not through an imaginary, but through an intellectual vision (although this is a subtler one that that already mentioned), just as He appeared to the Apostles, without entering through the door, when He said to them: "Pax vobis" {cf. John 20:19,21}. This instantaneous communication of God to the soul is so great a secret and so sublime a favour, and such delight is felt by the soul, that I do not know with what to compare it, beyond saying that the Lord is pleased to manifest to the soul at that moment the glory that is in Heaven, in a sublimer manner than is possible through any vision or spiritual consolation. It is impossible to say more than that, as far as one can understand, the soul (I mean the spirit of this soul) is made one with God, Who, being likewise a Spirit, has been pleased to reveal the love that He has for us by showing to certain persons the extent of that love, so that we may praise His greatness. For He has been pleased to unite Himself with His creature in such a way that they have become like two who cannot be separated from one another: even so He will not separate Himself from her.




Christianity / Catholicism 3482 | 
Interior Castle. Trans. E. Allison Peers. New York: Bantam Doubleday Dell Publishing Group, Inc., 1990, p. 213-4, Seventh Mansions, Chapter 2, Paragraph 3 







H e who is joined to God becomes one spirit with Him.




Christianity 3479 | 
1 Corinthians 6:17 







B ut note very carefully, daughters, that the silkworm has of necessity to die; and it is this which will cost you most; for death comes more easily when one can see oneself living a new life, whereas our duty now is to continue living this present life, and yet to die of our own free will. I confess to you that we shall find this much harder, but it is of the greatest value and the reward will be greater too if you gain the victory. But you must not doubt the possibility of this true union with the will of God. This is the union which I have desired all my life; it is for this that I continually beseech Our Lord; it is this which is the most genuine and the safest.




Christianity / Catholicism 3478 | 
Interior Castle. Trans. E. Allison Peers. New York: Bantam Doubleday Dell Publishing Group, Inc., 1990, p. 113, Fifth Mansions, Chapter 3, Paragraph 6 







I n thus allowing God to work in it, the soul … is at once illumined and transformed in God, and God communicates to it His supernatural Being, in such wise that it appears to be God Himself, and has all that God Himself has. And this union comes to pass when God grants the soul this supernatural favour, that all the things of God and the soul are one in participant transformation; and the soul seems to be God rather than a soul, and is indeed God by participation; although it is true that its natural being, though thus transformed, is as distinct from the Being of God as it was before…




Christianity / Catholicism 3469 | 
Ascent of Mount Carmel. Trans. E. Allison Peers, Book 2, Chapter 5, Paragraph 7 







G od dwells and is present substantially in every soul, even in that of the greatest sinner in the world. And this kind of union is ever wrought between God and all the creatures, for in it He is preserving their being: if union of this kind were to fail them, they would at once become annihilated and would cease to be. And so, when we speak of union of the soul with God, we speak not of this substantial union which is continually being wrought, but of the union and transformation of the soul with God, which is not being wrought continually, but only when there is produced that likeness that comes from love; we shall therefore term this the union of likeness, even as that other union is called substantial or essential. The former is natural, the latter supernatural. And the latter comes to pass when the two wills -- namely that of the soul and that of God -- are conformed together in one, and there is naught in the one that repugnant to the other. And thus, when the soul rids itself totally of that which is repugnant to the Divine will and conforms not with it, it is transformed in God through love.




Christianity / Catholicism 3468 | 
Ascent of Mount Carmel. Trans. E. Allison Peers, Book 2, Chapter 5, Paragraph 3 







I n order to reach the summit of this high mount, (the soul) must have changed its garments (resulting in) a new understanding of God in God, the old human understanding being cast aside; and a new love of God in God, the will being now stripped of all its old desires and human pleasures, and the soul being brought into a new state of knowledge and profound delight, all other old images and forms of knowledge having been cast away, and all that belongs to the old man, which is the aptitude of the natural self, quelled, and the soul clothed with a new supernatural aptitude with respect to all its faculties. So that its operation, which before was human, has become Divine, which is that that is attained in the state of union, wherein the soul becomes naught else than an altar whereon God is adored in praise and love, and God alone is upon it …




Christianity / Catholicism 3461 | 
Ascent of Mount Carmel. Trans. E. Allison Peers, Book 1, Chapter 5, Paragraph 7 







L ikewise, divine goodness granted me, afterward, the grace that from two there was made one, because I could not will anything except as he himself willed. How great is the mercy of the one who realized this union! -- it almost completely stabilized my soul. I possessed God so fully that I was no longer in my previous customary state but was led to find a peace in which I was united with God and was content with everything.




Christianity / Catholicism 3455 | 
Complete Works. Mahwah, New Jersey: Paulist Press, 1993, pp. 181-182 







B ecause of love, and in it, the soul first grows tender, then it pines and grows weak, and afterward finds strength… Thus the soul in the beginning seeks divine consolations, but if these are withdrawn, it grows tender, and even cries out against God and complains to him: "You are hurting me! Why are you doing this?" and so forth. Assurance of God's presence engenders tenderness in the soul. In this state it is satisfied with consolations and other similar gifts. But in the absence of these, love grows and begins to seek the loved one. If it does not find him, the soul pines. It is then no longer satisfied with consolations, for it seeks only the Beloved. The more the soul receives consolations and feels God, the more its love grows, but the more, likewise, it pines in the absence of the Beloved.

But once the soul is perfectly united to God, it is placed in the seat of truth, for truth is the seat of the soul… It possesses God to the fullness of its capacity. And God even expands the soul so that it may hold all that he wishes to place in it… In this light it sees so well that God does everything with order and appropriateness that even in his absence, it does not pine. Likewise it becomes so conformed to God's will that even in his absence it is content with everything he does and entrusts itself totally to him.





Christianity / Catholicism 3448 | 
Complete Works. Mahwah, New Jersey: Paulist Press, 1993, p. 223 







I have seen my Lord with the eye of my heart, and I said: "Who are You?" He said:"You."




Islam / Sufism 3438 | 
Diwan al-Hallaj, M. 10 







T he soul cannot live unless it is ineffably and without confusion united to God, who is truly the life eternal (cf. 1 John 5:20). Before this union in knowledge, vision, and perception it is dead, even though it is endowed with intellect and is by nature immortal…




Christianity / Orthodoxy 3434 | 
The Discourses, pp. 182-184, Trans. C.J. de Catanzaro. Ramsey, N.J.: Paulist Press, 1980. 







D eification is an enhypostatic and direct illumination which has no beginning, but appears in those worthy as something exceeding their comprehension. It is indeed mystical union with God, beyond intellect and reason, in the age when creatures will no longer know corruption.




Christianity / Orthodoxy 3365 | 
The Triads in Defence of the Hesychasts, Book 3, Chapter 1, Paragraphs 29 







W hat can I say about the stations of those who have attained union except that they are infinite, while the stations of the travelers have a limit? The limit of the travelers is union. But what could be the limit of those in union? -- that is, that union which cannot be marred by separation. No ripe grape ever again becomes green, and no mature fruit ever again becomes raw.




Islam / Sufism 3334 | 
The Sufi Path of Love: The Spiritual Teachings of Rumi, p. 247, Trans. William C. Chittick. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1983 







T o deem oneself exalted is to claim copartnership with God. As long as you have not died and become living through Him, you are a rebel seeking a realm for your copartnership. When you have become living through Him, you are indeed He. That is utter Oneness, how could that be copartnership?




Islam / Sufism 3328 | 
The Sufi Path of Love: The Spiritual Teachings of Rumi, pp. 183-184, Trans. William C. Chittick. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1983 







I swear that ever since the first day You brought me back to life,
The day You became my Friend,
I have not slept --
And even if You drive me from your door,
I swear again that we will never be separated--
Because You are alive in my heart.





Islam / Sufism 3292 | 
Doorkeeper of the heart : versions of Rabia. Trans. Charles Upton. Putney, Vt.: Threshold Books, 1988, p. 51 







I n the same way, when there is the state of extinction (fana') -- which the men of the way also call "union" (ittihad) -- the worshipper and the Worshipped, the Lord and the servant, disappear together. If there is no worshipper, there is no Worshipped; and if there is no servant, there is no Lord. For, when two terms are correlative, the disappearance of one necessarily brings about the disappearance of the other, and therefore they disappear together.




Islam / Sufism 3271 | 
Kitab al-Mawaqif 215, p. 100,in The Spiritual Writings of 'Abd al-Kader. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1995 







T he divine Reality, when it "combines" with the creatures in a strictly conceptual mode, is hidden to the eyes of the spiritually veiled, who see only the creatures. Conversely, it is the creatures that disappear in the eyes of the masters of the Unicity of contemplation(wahdat al-shuhud), for they see only God alone. Thus, both God and the creatures hide the other…




Islam / Sufism 3270 | 
Kitab al-Mawaqif 215, p. 100,in The Spiritual Writings of 'Abd al-Kader. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1995 







T he sun symbolizes the Lord -- may He be exalted! -- just as the moon symbolizes the servant. Their "conjunction" symbolizes the degree of the "union of the union" (jam' al-jam'), which is the ultimate degree, the greatest deliverance and the supreme felicity; and consists in seeing at the same time the creation subsisting by God, and God manifesting Himself by His creation…




Islam / Sufism 3259 | 
Kitab al-Mawaqif 320, pp. 53-55,in The Spiritual Writings of 'Abd al-Kader. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1995 







H e who knows me as his own divine Self breaks through the belief that he is the body and is not reborn as a separate creature. Such a one is united with me. Delivered from selfish attachment, fear, and anger, filled with me, surrendering themselves to me, purified in the fire of my being, many have reached the state of unity in me.




Hinduism 3241 | 
BG 4:9-10, p. 86, The Bhagavad Gita. Trans. Eknath Easwaran. Tomales, CA.: Nilgiri Press, 1985. 







B ut those who worship me with love live in me, and I come to life in them.




Hinduism 3240 | 
BG 9:29, p. 135, The Bhagavad Gita. Trans. Eknath Easwaran. Tomales, CA.: Nilgiri Press, 1985. 







A s the rivers flowing east and west
Merge in the sea and become one with it,
Forgetting they were ever separate rivers,
So do all creatures lose their separateness
When they merge at last into pure Being.





Hinduism 3225 | 
Chandogya Up. 10:1-2, pp. 184-185 in The Upanishads. Trans. Eknath Easwaran. Tomales, CA.: Nilgiri Press, 1987 







T he separate self dissolves in the sea of pure consciousness, infinite and immortal. Separateness arises from identifying the Self with the body, which is made up of the elements; when this physical identification dissolves, there can be no more separte self. This is what I want to tell you, beloved.




Hinduism 3224 | 
Brihadaranyaka Up. Chapter 2, 4:12, p. 38 in The Upanishads. Trans. Eknath Easwaran. Tomales, CA.: Nilgiri Press, 1987 







W hat the sages sought they have found at last. No more questions have they to ask of life. With self-will extinguished, they are at peace. Seeing the Lord of Love in all around, Serving the Lord of Love in all around, they are united with him forever.




Hinduism 3223 | 
Mundaka Up. 3:2:5, p. 117 in The Upanishads. Trans. Eknath Easwaran. Tomales, CA.: Nilgiri Press, 1987 







T hy Spirit is mingled in my spirit
even as wine is mingled with pure water.
When anything touches Thee,
it touches me.
Lo, in every case Thou art I!"





Islam / Sufism 3153 | 
Kitab al-Tawasin, in The Mystics of Islam, by Reynold A Nicholson 







I am He whom I love,
and He whom I love is I:
We are two spirits
dwelling in one body.
If thou seest me,
thou seest Him,
And if thou seest Him,
thou seest us both.





Islam / Sufism 3152 | 
Kitab al-Tawasin, in The Mystics of Islam, by Reynold A Nicholson, 1963; p. 151 







W hen sleep comes to an end, a man returns to his senses.
Now my individuality has come to an end, and I have returned to Shiva and Shakti.

Salt gives up its salty taste to become one with the ocean;
I give up my individual self to become Shiva and Shakti.

When the covering is removed, the air inside a plantain tree merges with the air outside.
And this is how I honor Shiva and Shakti by removing all separation and becoming one with them.





Hinduism 3115 | 
in Jonathan Star, the Inner Treasure, Tarcher Putnam, translated by Jonathan Star and Julle Lal from the Amritanubhava, Chapter 1. 







T he Saint becomes so unified with God, that it is impossible to distinguish between God and Saint.
Embrace meets embrace.
Body is unified with body.
Words mix with words.
Eyes meet with eyes.

I have girded up my loins, and found a way to cross the ocean of life.
Come here, come here, great and small, women and men.
Take no thought; have no anxiety.
I shall carry all of you to the other shore.
A come as the sole bearer of the stamp of God
to carry you over with His Name.





Hinduism 3107 | 
Ranade, R. D. Mysticism in India. Albany, NY. SUMY Press, 1983, pp. 303, 312, 320, 339, 349. 







M y mind fell like a hailstone into that vast expanse of Consciousness.
Touching one drop of it I melted away and became one with the Absolute.
And now, though I return to human consciousness,
I see nothing, I hear nothing,
I know that nothing is different from me.





Hinduism 3099 | 
Prabhavananda, Swami, and isherwood, Christopher, trans. Shankara's Crest-Jewel of Discrimination. New York: New American Library, 194 7, pp. 119-127. 







T he eye by which I see God is the same as the eye by which God sees me. My eye and God's eye are one and the same one in seeing, one in knowing, and one in loving.




Christianity 3087 | 
Pfeiffer, Frantz, and Evans, C de B., trans. Meister Eckhart. London: John M. Watkins, 1924, 193 1, Vol. 1: 118, 157, 221-222, 287, 338, 348, 363, 429, and Vol. 2: 41, 114. 







G od has given birth to the Son as you, as me, as each one of us. As many beings as many gods in God.
In my soul, God not only gives birth to me as His son, He gives birth to me as Himself, and Himself as me.
My physical father is my father with but a small part of his being, and I live my life separate from him. He may be dead, and I may live. God, however, is my father with His entire being, and I am never separate from Him. I am always His; I am alive only because He is alive.

In this divine birth I find that God and I are the same: I am what I am and what I shall remain, now and forever. I am carried above was the highest angels. I neither increase nor decrease, for in this birth I have become the motionless cause of all that moves. I have won back what has always been mine. Here, in my own soul, the greatest of all miracles has taken place-God has returned to God!





Christianity 3086 | 
Pfeiffer, Frantz, and Evans, C de B., trans. Meister Eckhart. London: John M. Watkins, 1924, 193 1, Vol. 1: 118, 157, 221-222, 287, 338, 348, 363, 429, and Vol. 2: 41, 114. 







N ever has anything become so kindred, so alike, so one with another, as the soul becomes with God in this birth . . . In this birth, God flows into the soul with such dazzling light that God and the soul merge into one-one spirit, one essence, one Being.




Christianity 3085 | 
Pfeiffer, Frantz, and Evans, C de B., trans. Meister Eckhart. London: John M. Watkins, 1924, 193 1, Vol. 1: 118, 157, 221-222, 287, 338, 348, 363, 429, and Vol. 2: 41, 114. 







W hen the soul is totally lost, it finds that it is the very self it had sought for so long in vain. Here the soul is God. Here it enjoys supreme bliss. Here it is sufficient unto itself Here it shines with its own radiance. Here, at last, it has found that the Kingdom of God is itself !




Christianity 3083 | 
Pfeiffer, Frantz, and Evans, C de B., trans. Meister Eckhart. London: John M. Watkins, 1924, 193 1, Vol. 1: 118, 157, 221-222, 287, 338, 348, 363, 429, and Vol. 2: 41, 114. 







A soul pure in God is God.




Christianity / Orthodoxy 3077 | 
Kadloubovsky, E., and Palmer G. E. H., trans. Early Fathers from the Philokalia. London: Faber and Faber Limited, 1954, pp. 109,157-158, 161, 166,170 







H appy is the moment, when we sit together,
With two forms, two faces, yet one soul, you and I.

The flowers will bloom forever,
The birds will sing their eternal song,
The moment we enter the garden, you and I.

The stars of heaven will come out to watch us,
And we will show them the light of a full moon, you and I.

No thoughts of "you," no thoughts of I,"
Just the bliss of union-
Joyous, alive, free of care, you and I.

All the bright-winged birds of heaven
Will swoop down to drink our sweet water-
The ocean of our laughter, you and I.

What a miracle of fate, us sitting here.
Even at the far ends of the earth
We would still be together, you and I.

We have one form in this world, another in the next.
To us belongs an eternal heaven, the endless delight, you and I.





Islam / Sufism 3057 | 
Star, Jonathan, and Shiva, Shahram, trans. A Garden Beyond Paradise. New York: Bantam Books, 1992 







T he Beloved is in the sight,
and the sight is in the Beloved.





Islam / Sufism 3050 | 
Star, Jonathan, and Shiva, Shahram, trans. A Garden Beyond Paradise. New York: Bantam Books, 1992 







S how me a Man of God.
Show me a man modeled after the doctrines that are ever upon his lips.
Show me a man who is hard-pressed-and happy,
In danger-and happy,
On his death-bed-and happy,
in exile-and happy,
In evil report-and happy.

Show him to me.
I ask again.

So help me, Heaven,
I long to see one Man of God!
And if you cannot show me one fully realized, let me see one in whom the process is at work or one whose bent is in that direction.
Do me that favor!
Grudge it not to an old man, to behold such wonder.
Do you think I wish to see the Zeus or Athena of Phidias, sparkling with ivory and gold?
No. Show me one of you, a human soul, longing to be of one with God.





Philosophy / Stoicism 3043 | 
Crossley, Hastings, trans. The Golden Sayings of Epictetus. New York: P E Collier and Son, 1909, verses 1, 66, 77. 







A s Marcus, I have Rome; as a human being, I have the Universe.




Philosophy / Stoicism 3039 | 
Book 7:13, Book 11:9, and Book 6:44. 







C onstantly remind yourself, I am a member of the whole body of conscious things." If you think of yourself as a mere "part," then love for mankind will not well up in your heart; you will look for some reward in every act of kindness and miss the boon which the act itself is offering. Then all your work will be seen as a mere duty and not as the very portal connecting you with the Universe itself.




Philosophy / Stoicism 3037 | 
Book 7:13, Book 11:9, and Book 6:44. 







O ne Nature, perfect and pervading, circulates in all natures.
One Reality, all comprehensive, contains within itself all realities.
The one moon is reflected wherever there is a sheet of water,
And all the moons in all the waters are embraced within the one moon;
The embodied Truth of all the Buddhas enters into my own being,
And my own being is found in union with theirs.





Buddhism / Mahayana / Zen (Chan) 3024 | 
Suzuki, D. T Manual of Zen Buddhism. New York: Grove Press, 1960, pp. 97-100 







S ee the whole of this universe,
the movable and immovable,
and whatever else you wish to see, unified, as one, in my body.





Hinduism 3010 | 
Chapter 11, translated by Jonathan Star and Julle Lal, the Inner Treasure, Tarcher Putnam. 







W hen the mysterious unity between the soul and the Divine becomes clear, you will realize that you are none other than God. You will see all your actions as His actions; all your features as His features; all your breaths as His breath.




Islam / Sufism 3006 | 
Manheim, Ralph, trans. Creative Imagination in the Sufism of Ibn 'Arabi. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1969, pp. 174-175. 





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