Inter -  Faiths  Dialogue



Interreligious dialogue : Detachement > from Ego, I and mine

Onelittleangel > Detachement > from Ego, I and mine
70  quote(s)  | Page 1 / 2





G od said to Moses once: "Go out and find
The secret truth that haunts the devil's mind."
When Moses met the devil that same day
He asked for his advice and heard him say:
"Remember this, repeat it constantly,
Don't speak of 'me', or you will be like me."
If life still holds you by a single hair,
The end of your toil will be dispair;
No matter how you prosper, there will rise
Before your face a hundred smirking "I"s.





Islam / Sufism 4524 | 
The Conference of the Birds, p150. 







U ntil this dog, the Self, can be subdued
Our life is folly endlessly renewed





Islam / Sufism 4523 | 
The Conference of the Birds, p96 







W here egoism exists, Thou art not experienced,
Where Thou art, is not egoism.
You who are learned, expound in your mind
this inexpressible proposition.





Sikhism 4398 | 
Maru-ki-Var, M.1, p. 1092 







T hey are forever free who renounce all selfish desires and break away
from the ego-cage of "I," "me," and "mine" to be united with the Lord.
Attain to this, and pass from death to immortality.





Hinduism 4394 | 
Bhagavad Gita 2.71 







H e who has no thought of "I" and "mine" whatever towards his mind and
body, he who grieves not for that which he has not, he is, indeed, called
a bhikkhu.





Buddhism 4393 | 
Dhammapada 367 







B lessed One, what is meant by this term Nirvana?" Replied the Buddha,
"When the self-nature and the habit-energy of all the
sense-discriminations, includ- ing ego (alaya), intellect (manas), and the
faculty of judgment (manovijnana), from which issue the habit-energy of
wrong speculations--when all these go through a revulsion, I and all the
Buddhas declare that there is Nirvana. The way and the self-nature of
this Nirvana is emptiness, which is the state of reality."





Buddhism / Mahayana 4307 | 
Lankavatara Sutra 38 







B y reason of the habit-energy stored up by false imagination since beginningless time, this world is subject to change and destruction from moment to moment; it is like a river, a seed, a lamp, wind, a cloud; like a monkey who is always restless, like a fly who is ever in search of unclean things and defiled places, like a fire which is never satisfied. Again, [thought] is like a water-wheel or a machine: it goes on rolling the wheel of transmigration, carrying varieties of bodies and forms... causing the wooden figures to move as a magician moves them. Mahamati, a thorough understanding concerning these phenomena is called comprehending the egolessness of persons.




Buddhism / Mahayana 4268 | 
Lankavatara Sutra 24 







I have been crucified with Christ; it is no longer I who live, but Christ who lives in me.




Christianity 4184 | 
Galatians 2.20 







I f one has a self (?) it is impossible to achieve the great oneness.




Daoism / Neo Daoism 4034 | 
ZZJS, 397, trad. B. Ziporyn, 2003, p.67 
see also ZZJS, 185 and 401, trad. B. Ziporyn, 2003, p.67, ZZJS, 78, trad. B. Ziporyn, 2003, p.73







T he great man have no self.




Daoism 4032 | 
Zhuangzi, chap.17 (shool of Tchuang Tzu), trad. A.C Graham, p.150 







I , and "mine" that is ignorance. By discriminating, you will realize that what you call "I" is really nothing but Atman [the Self].




Hinduism 3892 | 
Nikhilananda, 1942; p. 208 







M aya is nothing but the egotism of the embodied soul. This egotism has covered everything like a veil. All troubles come to an end when the ego dies. 'if by the grace of God a man but once realizes that he is not the doer, then he at once becomes a jivanmukta [a liberated being]. Though living in the body, he is liberated. He has nothing else to fear.




Hinduism 3891 | 
Nikhilananda, 1942; pp. 168-169 







W hen a seeker merges in the beatitude of samadbi, he does not perceive time and space or name and form, the offspring of maya. Whatever -is within the domain of maya is unreal. Give it up. Destroy the prison house of name and form arid rush out of it with the strength of a lion. Dive deep in search of the Self and realize It through samadhi, You will find the world of name and form vanishing into void, and the puny ego dissolving in Brahman-Consciousness. You will realize your identity with Brahman, Existence-Knowledge-Bliss Absolute.




Hinduism 3877 | 
Nikhilananda, 1942; p. 28 







B rahman is the only Reality, ever pure, ever illumined, ever free, beyond the limits of time, space, and causation. Though apparently divided by names and forms through the inscrutable power of maya, that enchantress who makes the impossible possible, Brahman is really One and undivided.




Hinduism 3876 | 
Nikhilananda, 1942; p. 28 







M y enemy "I" is now dead; now none can slay me.
'Tis I who have slain myself; I have died, arid yet live.
While the thought of self remains, so long are there two.
When this selfhood is destroyed, then there is no second.
Then only will you find the Beloved, when "I" and "mine" are wholly lost.
When "I" and "mine" are no more, then shall you find the pure vision. "I" and "mine" are a load upon the head; you die with the weight of it. (1)

In front of [the true] I, stands the [false] I; for this reason, He remains hidden. (2)





Others Beliefs 3872 | 
(1) Jiwat Mritak; Orr, 1947, pp. 162-163 ; (2) Jiwat Mritak; Orr, 1947, p. 142 







W hen I am not, then there is One; when I intrude, then two.
When the curtain of "I" and "Thou" is drawn aside, then do I become as I was [in the Beginning].





Others Beliefs 3871 | 
Jiwat Mritak; Orr, 1947, pp. 105-106 







M y enemy "I" is dead; now none can smite me down.
'Tis I who have slain myself; thus, being dead, I live.
We have slain our enemy, we have died; but he is not forgotten;
The thorn remains to vex us. Consider and lay this truth to heart:
You will only find the Beloved when you are as the living dead,
Only by losing yourself can you find Him who knows all.
When you regard yourself as nothing, then you will find the Beloved.
Recognize, therefore, by quiet reflection, from whence this thought of sell' arises.
Becoming as the living dead, enter onto the path





Others Beliefs 3870 | 
Jiwat Mritak; Orr, 1947, pp. 105-106 







W here Rama is, there I am not; where I am, there Rama is not.
This mansion is of delicate construction; there is no place for two.
While self remains, so long will there be a second;
When this selfhood is blotted out, then there is no other.
When I am not, there is but One; when I obtrude, then two.
When the veil of "I" is taken away, then does the One become as It was.





Others Beliefs 3869 | 
Parcha; Orr, 1947, p. 66 







L ove based on a desire for gain is worthless.
God is desireless; how could one with desire attain the Desireless?
When I was conscious of individual existence, the love of the Master filled my heart;
When the love of the Master filled my heart, my sense of selfhood was dissolved.
0 Kabir, this path is too narrow for two to travel .





Others Beliefs / Litterature 3852 | 
Bijak, Shastri, 1941;p.38 







A ll that is other than the true "I" must be slain.




Islam / Sufism 3795 | 
Mathnawi; Winfield, 1898 







Y ou are the Self, the infinite Being, the pure, unchanging Consciousness, which pervades everything. Your nature is bliss and your glory is without stain. Because you identify yourself with the ego, you are tied to birth and death. Your bondage has no other cause.




Hinduism 3704 | 
Vivekachudamani; Prahhavananda, 1947, p.97 







U tterly destroy the ego. Control the many waves of distraction which it raises in the mind. Discern the Reality and realize "I am That."
You are pure Consciousness, the witness of all experiences. Your real nature is joy. Cease this very moment to identify yourself with the ego.





Hinduism 3703 | 
Vivekachudamani; Prahhavananda, 1947, p.97 







T herefore I say, the Perfect One has won complete deliverance through the extinction, fading-away, disappearance, rejection, and getting rid of all opinions and conjectures, of all inclination to the vain-glory of `I' and `mine'.




Buddhism 3536 | 
Majjhima Nikaya, 72 







O h, there is many a trusty, martyred ego that has died in this world but walks about like the living. The brigand spirit has died, but its sword remains in the hand of the warrior. The sword is the same sword, but the man is not the same man -- the form confuses you. Once the ego has been transformed, the sword -- the body -- is held in the hand of the Bountiful Lord's craftsmanship.




Islam / Sufism 3331 | 
The Sufi Path of Love: The Spiritual Teachings of Rumi, pp. 185-186, Trans. William C. Chittick. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1983 







S o behead your selfhood, oh warrior! Become selfless and annihilated, like a dervish!




Islam / Sufism 3318 | 
the Sufi Path of Love: The Spiritual Teachings of Rumi, p. 188, Trans. William C. Chittick. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1983 







C oncern yourself not with the thief-like ego and its business. Whatever is not God's work is nothing, nothing!




Islam / Sufism 3316 | 
The Sufi Path of Love: The Spiritual Teachings of Rumi, p. 33, Trans. William C. Chittick. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1983 







T he intellect and the ego, are very necessary for the manifestation of good and evil. Day and night in this abode of dust these two necessary beings are in war and altercation. The {ego} always desires the necessities of the household -- reputation, bread, food, and position The ego sometimes displays humility and sometimes seeks leadership to remedy its plight.




Islam / Sufism 3306 | 
The Sufi Path of Love: The Spiritual Teachings of Rumi, p. 165, Trans. William C. Chittick. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1983 







T he intellect is luminous and seeks the good. How then can the dark ego vanquish it? The ego is in its own bodily home, and your intellect is a stranger; At its doorstep, a dog is an awesome lion.




Islam / Sufism 3305 | 
The Sufi Path of Love: The Spiritual Teachings of Rumi, p. 35, Trans. William C. Chittick. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1983 







T his ego is hell, and hell is a dragon not diminished by oceans of water. It drinks down the seven seas, yet the heat of that manburner does not become less. It makes a morsel out of a world and gulps it down. Its belly keeps shouting: Is there any more?




Islam / Sufism 3303 | 
The Sufi Path of Love: The Spiritual Teachings of Rumi, pp. 89-90, Trans. William C. Chittick. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1983 







W henever there remains any support for the ego within, even if it be only an atom's weight, then you are pretentious and have a devil who leads you astray.




Islam / Sufism 3282 | 
The Key To Salvation: A Sufi Manual of Invocation. Trans. Mary Ann Koury Danner. Cambridge: The Islamic Texts Society, 1996, p. 101 







T hey are forever free who renounce all selfish desires and break away from the ego-cage of "I", "me", and "mine" to be united with the Lord. This is the supreme state. Attain to this, and pass from death to immortality.




Hinduism 3232 | 
BG 2:71, p. 69, The Bhagavad Gita. Trans. Eknath Easwaran. Tomales, CA.: Nilgiri Press, 1985. 







T he supreme Self is neither born nor dies. He cannot be burned, moved, pierced, cut, nor dried. Beyond all attributes, the supreme Self is the eternal witness, ever pure, indivisible, and uncompounded, far beyond the senses and the ego He is omnipresent, beyond all thought, without action in the external world, without action in the internal world. Detached from the outer and the inner, This supreme Self purifies the impure.




Hinduism 3207 | 
Atma Up. 3, p. 242 in The Upanishads. Trans. Eknath Easwaran. Tomales, CA.: Nilgiri Press, 1987 







V ijay:
Sir, why are we bound like this? Why don't we see God?
Ramakrishna:
Maya is nothing but the egotism of the embodied soul. This egotism has covered everything like a veil. "All troubles come to an end when the ego dies." If by God's grace a man but once realizes that he is not the doer, then he at once becomes a jivanmukta: though living in the body, he is liberated. He has nothing else to fear.
This maya, that is to say, the ego, is like a cloud. The sun cannot be seen on account of a thin patch of cloud; when that disappears one sees the sun. If by the guru's grace one's ego vanishes, then one sees God.





Hinduism 3196 | 
Mahendranath Gupta. The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna. Trans. Swami Nikhilananda. New York: Ramakrishna-Vivekananda Center, 1942, 1948, 1958, pp. 226-227 







T hose who cannot give up attachment to worldly things and who find no means to shake off the feeling of I, should rather cherish the idea, "I am God's servant; I am His devotee." One can also realize God by following the path of devotion.




Hinduism 3187 | 
Mahendranath Gupta. The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna. Trans. Swami Nikhilananda. New York: Ramakrishna-Vivekananda Center, 1942, 1948, 1958, p. 155 







K eshab:
Sir, if one gave up the I, nothing whatsoever would remain.
Ramakrishna:
I am not asking you to give up all of the I. You should give up only the "unripe I." The "unripe I" makes one feel: "I am the doer. These are my wife and children. I am a teacher." Renounce this "unripe I" and keep the "ripe I" which will make you feel that you are God's servant, His devotee, and that God is the Doer and you are His instrument.





Hinduism 3179 | 
Mahendranath Gupta. The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna. Trans. Swami Nikhilananda. New York: Ramakrishna-Vivekananda Center, 1942, 1948, 1958, pp. 266-267 







T he ego is like a stick that seems to divide the water in two. It makes you feel that you are one and I am another. When the ego disappears in samadhi one realizes Brahman as one's own inner consciousness.




Hinduism 3178 | 
Mahendranath Gupta. The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna. Trans. Swami Nikhilananda. New York: Ramakrishna-Vivekananda Center, 1942, 1948, 1958, p. 284 







T hink of Brahman, Existence-Knowledge-Bliss Absolute, as a shoreless ocean. Through the cooling influence, as it were, of the bhakta's love, the water is frozen at places into blocks of ice. In other words, God now and then assumes various forms for His lovers and reveals Himself to them as a Person. But with the rising of the Sun of Knowledge, the blocks of ice melt. Then one doesn't feel any more that God is a Person, nor does one see God's forms. What He is cannot be described. Who will describe Him? He who would do so disappears. He cannot find his I any more.




Hinduism 3168 | 
Mahendranath Gupta. The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna. Trans. Swami Nikhilananda. New York: Ramakrishna-Vivekananda Center, 1942, 1948, 1958, p. 209 







E verything is Brahman, but this has to be realized; merely saying that you are Brahman cannot make you realize the truth. You ought to experience that state, rising above all sense of duality by freeing your mind from illusion. Your 'I' should no longer be the local, narrow individual 'I' but the universal, eternal and absolute 'I'. To realize this ineffable, perfect state, sadbana is necessary. Mind and its desires have to be conquered by concentration and purification




Hinduism 3162 | 
In the Vision of God, Volume 1, by Swami Ramdas, pp 219-220 







K now in the first place that the God you seek is within yourself. He is the life and soul of the universe and to attain Him is the supreme purpose of life. Evil and sorrow are due to your belief that you are separate from this universal Truth. The ego has set up this wall of separation. Have a strong and intense longing to realize Him, that is, to know that your life is one with the life of the universe. Then surrender up the ego by constant identification with Him through prayer, meditation and performance of all action without desiring their fruit. As you progress on this path, which is the path of devotion, knowledge and self-surrender, your attachment to the unrealities of life will slacken, and the illusions of the mind will be dispelled. Now your heart will be filled with divine love, and your vision purified and equalized, and your actions will become the spontaneous outflow of your immortal being, yielding you the experience of true joy and peace. This is the culmination of human endeavor and fulfillment of the purpose of life




Hinduism 3160 | 
In the Vision of God, Volume 1, by Swami Ramdas, pp 118-119 







B y Allah!
I long to escape the prison of my ego
and lose myself
in the mountains and the desert.





Islam / Sufism 3140 | 
The Love Poems of Rumi' - Deepak Chopra & Fereydoun Kia 







W hether your destiny is glory or disgrace,
Purify yourself of hatred and love of self.
Polish your mirror; and that sublime Beauty
From the regions of mystery
Will flame out in your heart
As it did for the saints and prophets.
Then, with your heart on fire with that Splendor,
The secret of the Beloved will no longer be hidden.





Islam / Sufism 3138 | 
translation by Andrew Harvey and Eryk Hanut - 'Perfume of the Desert' 







N ot the profusion of prayer and fasting, but wholeness of the breast and selflessness.




Islam / Sufism 3131 | 
In al-Qushayri, Kitab al-Sama` in al-Rasa'il al-Qushayriyya (Sidon and Beirut: al-Maktaba al-`Asriyya, 1970) p. 60. 







W hen sleep comes to an end, a man returns to his senses.
Now my individuality has come to an end, and I have returned to Shiva and Shakti.

Salt gives up its salty taste to become one with the ocean;
I give up my individual self to become Shiva and Shakti.

When the covering is removed, the air inside a plantain tree merges with the air outside.
And this is how I honor Shiva and Shakti by removing all separation and becoming one with them.





Hinduism 3115 | 
in Jonathan Star, the Inner Treasure, Tarcher Putnam, translated by Jonathan Star and Julle Lal from the Amritanubhava, Chapter 1. 







W hat are "I" and "You"?
Just lattices
In the niches of a lamp
Through which the One Light radiates.

"I" and "You" are the veil
Between heaven and earth;
Lift this veil and you will see
How all sects and religions are one.

Lift this veil and you will ask---
When "I" and "You" do not exist
What is mosque?
What is synagogue?
What is fire temple?





Islam / Sufism 3065 | 
translation by Andrew Harvey and Eryk Hanut - 'Perfume of the Desert' 







S acrifice your ego; nothing more.




Islam / Sufism 2986 | 
Essential Sufism, by James Fadiman & Robert Frager, Harper SanFrancisco, p.158 







G o you, sweep out the dwelling room of your heart, prepare it to be the home of the Beloved. When you go out, He will come in. Within you, when you are free from self, He will show His beauty.




Islam / Sufism 2980 | 
Essential Sufism, by James Fadiman & Robert Frager, Harper SanFrancisco, p.102 







H appy is he who is able to escape from the lower self and feel the gentle breeze of friendship. His heart is so full of the Beloved that there is no longer room for anyone else. The Beloved flows through his every vein and nerve. Every atom of his body is filled with the Friend.
The true lovers can no longer perceive either the scent or the color of their own selves. They have no interest in anything other than the Beloved. Their heart is attached neither to throne nor crown. Greed and lust have packed their bags and left their street. If they speak, it is to the Friend. If they seek, it is from the Friend. They no longer take themselves into account, and live only for love. They, leave the raw and turn to the ripe, abandoning completely the abode of the self





Islam / Sufism 2979 | 
Essential Sufism, by James Fadiman & Robert Frager, Harper SanFrancisco, p.99 







B etween me and You there lingers an "it is I" which torments me.
Ah! Lift through mercy this "it is I' from between us both!





Islam / Sufism 2974 | 
Essential Sufism, by James Fadiman & Robert Frager, Harper SanFrancisco, p.246 







D hu-1-Nun. Said to a disciple, "Start instructing people by lecturing, but always remember never to bring yourself [your ego] in between.




Islam / Sufism 2959 | 
Essential Sufism, by James Fadiman & Robert Frager, Harper SanFrancisco, p.214 







F irst He pampered me with a hundred favors,
Then he melted me with the fires of sorrows.
After He sealed me with the seal of Love, I became Him.
Then, he threw my self out of me.





Islam / Sufism 2936 | 
Essential Sufism, by James Fadiman & Robert Frager, Harper SanFrancisco, p.250 





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