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Ibn 'Arabi




Spiritual quotes of Ibn 'Arabi
Onelittleangel > Islam > Sufism > Ibn 'Arabi
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I f men knew themselves, they would know God; and if they really knew God, they would be satisfied with Him and would think of Him alone.




3787 |  Islam, Sufism
in Landau, 1959; p. 79  







A s for the theorists and thinkers, and the scholastic theologians, with their talk about the soul and its properties, none of them have grasped the Reality; such speculation can never grasp it. He who seeks to know the Reality through theoretical speculation is flogging a dead horse; ... for he who seeks to know It by any means other than the one proper to It, will never grasp It.




3786 |  Islam, Sufism
in Austin, 1980; pp. 153  







T herefore, know your self, who you are, what is your identity. ... Consider well in what way you are Haqq, and in what way Khalq, as being separate, other.

He who knows himself knows his Lord; ... indeed, He is his very identity and reality.





3785 |  Islam, Sufism
in Austin, 1980; pp. 126, 153  







I n one sense the Reality is creatures; in another sense, It is not. ... Whether you assert that It is undivided or divided, the Self is alone. The manifold [universe] exists and yet it does not exist.




3784 |  Islam, Sufism
in Austin, 1980; p. 88  







I t is none other than He who progresses or journeys as you. There is nothing to be known but He; and since He is Being itself, He is therefore also the journeyer. There is no knower but He; so who are you? Know your true Reality. He is the essential self of all. But He conceals it by [the appearance of] otherness, which is "you."

If you hold to multiplicity, you are with the world; and if you hold to the Unity, you are with the Truth .... Our names are but names for God; at the same time our individual selves are His shadow. He is at once our identity and not our identity ... Consider!





3783 |  Islam, Sufism
in Austin, 1980; pp. 136, 126-127  







N othing but the Reality is; there is no separate being, no arriving and no being far away. This is seen in true vision; when I experienced it, I saw nothing but Him.
When my Beloved appears, with what eye do I see Him? With His eye not with mine; for no one sees Him except Himself.





3782 |  Islam, Sufism
in Austin, 1980.; p. 108  







K now that whenever something permeates another, it is assumed into the other.
That which permeates, the agent, is disguised by that which is permeated, the object.
In this case, the object is the manifest [universe], and the agent is the Unmanifest, the Hidden.

On Him alone we depend for everything; our dependence on other things is in reality dependence on Him, for they are nothing but His appearances.

The eye perceives nothing but Him; only He is to be known.
We are His; by Him we exist, and by
Him we are governed; and we are, at all times and in all states, in His presence.





3781 |  Islam, Sufism
in Austin, 1980.; pp. 92,98,137  







S uch knowledge can only be had by actual experience, nor can the reason of man define it, or arrive at any cognizance of it by deduction, just as one cannot, without experience, know the taste of honey, the bitterness of patience, the bliss of sexual union, love, passion, or desire.




3780 |  Islam, Sufism
Meccan Revelations, I  







T here is no existence save His existence. ... This means that the existence of the beggar is His existence and the existence of the sick is His existence. Now, when this is admitted, it is acknowledged that all existence is His existence; and that the existence of all created things, both accidents and substances, is His existence; and when the secret of one particle of the atoms is clear, the secret of all created things, both outward and inward, is clear; and you do not see in this world or the next, anything except God.




3779 |  Islam, Sufism
in Landau, 1959; pp. 83-84  







W hen the mystery of the oneness of the soul and the Divine is revealed to you, you will understand that you are no other than God. ... Then you will see all your actions to be His actions and all your attributes to be His attributes and your essence to be His essence.

... Thus, instead of [your own] essence, there is the essence of God and in place of [your own] attributes, there are the attributes of God. He who knows himself sees his whole existence to be the Divine existence, but does not experience that any change has taken place in his own nature or qualities. For when you know yourself, your sense of a limited identity vanishes, and you know that you and God are one and the same.





3778 |  Islam, Sufism
in Landau, 1959; pp. 83-84  







K now Him as both particularized and unparticularized, and be established in Truth. Be in a state of unity if you wish, or be in a state of separation if you wish; if the Totality reveals Itself to you, you will attain the crown of victory.




3777 |  Islam, Sufism
in Austin, 1980; p. 125  







C hoose less over more in it. Be satisfied with what you have, even if it is less than what others have. In fact, prefer to have less.




3542 |  Islam, Sufism
Essential Sufism, by James Fadiman & Robert Frager, Harper SanFrancisco, p.56  







W hat you plant here, you will reap there.




3541 |  Islam, Sufism
Essential Sufism, by James Fadiman & Robert Frager, Harper SanFrancisco, p.56  







W hen my Beloved appears, With what eye do I see Him? With His eye, not with mine, For none sees Him except Himself.




3151 |  Islam, Sufism
Tarjuman al-Ashwaq, in The Mystics of Islam, translated by Reynold A Nicholson  







A ll that is left
to us by tradition
is mere words.

It is up to us
to find out what they mean.





3150 |  Islam, Sufism
Tarjuman al-Ashwaq, in The Mystics of Islam, translated by Reynold A Nicholson  







O Marvel! A garden amidst the flames.
My heart has become capable of every form:
it is a pasture for gazelles and a convent for Christian monks,
and a temple for idols and the pilgrim's Kaa'ba,
and the tables of the Torah and the book of the Quran.
I follow the religion of Love: whatever way Love's camels take,
that is my religion and my faith.





3149 |  Islam, Sufism
Tarjuman al-Ashwaq, in The Mystics of Islam, translated by Reynold A Nicholson  







O dear one, listen! I am the reality of the world, the center of the circle. I am the parts and the whole. I am the will holding Heaven and Earth in place. I have given you sight only so you may see me.

0 dear one! I call again and again but you do not hear me, I appear again and again but you do not see me, I fill myself with fragrance, again and again, but you do not smell me. I become savory food yet you do not taste me. Why can't you reach me through your touch Or breathe me in through your sweet perfumes?

Love me, Love yourself in me. No one is deeper within you than I. Others may love you for their own sake, But I love you for yourself.

Dear one! This bargain is not fair. If you take one step toward me, It is only because I have taken a hundred toward you. I am closer to you than yourself. Closer than your soul, than your own breath. Why do you not see me? Why do you not hear me? I am so jealous. I want you to see me-and no one else. To hear me-and no one else, not even yourself

Dear one! Come with me. Let us go to Paradise together. And if we find any road that leads to separation, We will destroy that road. Let us go hand in hand In the presence of Love. Let it be our witness, Let it forever seal this wondrous union of ours.





3058 |  Islam, Sufism
Manheim, Ralph, trans. Creative Imagination in the Sufism of Ibn 'Arabi. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1969, pp. 174-175.  







W hen the mysterious unity between the soul and the Divine becomes clear, you will realize that you are none other than God. You will see all your actions as His actions; all your features as His features; all your breaths as His breath.




3006 |  Islam, Sufism
Manheim, Ralph, trans. Creative Imagination in the Sufism of Ibn 'Arabi. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1969, pp. 174-175.  







D o everything you do in order to come close to your Lord in your worship and prayers. Think that each deed may be your last act, each prayer your last prostration, that you may not have another chance. If you do this, it will be another motivation for becoming heedful and also for becoming sincere and truthful.




2977 |  Islam, Sufism
Essential Sufism, by James Fadiman & Robert Frager, Harper SanFrancisco, p.159  







T hose who adore God in the sun behold the sun, and those who adore Him in living things see a -living thing, and those who adore Him in lifeless things see a lifeless thing, and those who adore Him as a Being unique and unparalleled see that which has no like. Do not attach yourself to a particular creed exclusively so that you disbelieve in all the rest; otherwise you will lose much good; nay, you will fail to recognize the real truth of the matter. God, the omnipresent and omnipotent, is not limited by any one creed. Wheresoever you turn, there is the face of Allah.




2976 |  Islam, Sufism
Essential Sufism, by James Fadiman & Robert Frager, Harper SanFrancisco, p.229  







S eek the company of the wise, who know. Agree with what they say, for one understands only that with which one agrees. Be sincere in what you say- a single tongue should not speak two different words. No deceit or fraud should enter into your thoughts. Do not belittle anyone or anything, for everyone and everything in its inner being wishes for the same thing.
"Do not touch anything that is not yours. Avoid crowded places; even in such places, try to be with yourself, for that is the place where the truth is manifested. That is where the truth is.





2906 |  Islam, Sufism
Essential Sufism, by James Fadiman & Robert Frager, Harper SanFrancisco, p.84  







A li asked the Prophet, "What action can I take that is not totally lost and worthless?"
The Prophet answered, "Seek truth. You will find it in yourself, therefore, know yourself.





2905 |  Islam, Sufism
Essential Sufism, by James Fadiman & Robert Frager, Harper SanFrancisco, p.84  







T his world is a place of preparation where one is given many lessons and passes many tests.
[]
What is bad is what you do with the world when you become blind to truth and totally consumed by your desires, lust, and ambition for it.





2875 |  Islam, Sufism
Essential Sufism, by James Fadiman & Robert Frager, Harper SanFrancisco, p.56  





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