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Interreligious dialogue : Detachement > from intellect

Onelittleangel > Detachement > from intellect
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A thousand and hundred thousand feats of intellect shall not accompany man in the hereafter.




Sikhism 4348 | 
Adi Granth, Japuji 1, M.1, p. 1 







B lessed One, what is meant by this term Nirvana?" Replied the Buddha,
"When the self-nature and the habit-energy of all the
sense-discriminations, includ- ing ego (alaya), intellect (manas), and the
faculty of judgment (manovijnana), from which issue the habit-energy of
wrong speculations--when all these go through a revulsion, I and all the
Buddhas declare that there is Nirvana. The way and the self-nature of
this Nirvana is emptiness, which is the state of reality."





Buddhism / Mahayana 4307 | 
Lankavatara Sutra 38 







A s long as there is duality, one sees "the other," one hears "the other," one smells "the other," one speaks to "the other," one thinks of "the other," one knows "the other"; but when for the illumined soul the all is dissolved in the Self, who is there to be seen by whom, who is there to be smelled by whom, who is there to be heard by whom, who is there to be spoken to by whom, who is there to be thought of by whom, who is there to be known by whom? Ah, Maitreyi, my beloved, the Intelligence which reveals all--by what shall it be revealed? By whom shall the Knower be known? The Self is described as "not this, not that" (neti, neti). It is incomprehensible, for it cannot be comprehended; undecaying, for it never decays; unattached, for it never attaches itself; unbound, for it is never bound. By whom, O my beloved, shall the Knower be known?




Hinduism 4113 | 
Bhrihadaranyaka Upanishad 4.5.15 







I f you think that you know well the truth of Brahman, know that you know little. What you think to be Brahman in your self, or what you think to be Brahman in the gods--that is not Brahman. What is indeed the truth of Brahman you must therefore learn.
I cannot say that I know Brahman fully. Nor can I say that I know Him not. He among us knows Him best who understands the spirit of the words, "Nor do I know that I know Him not."

He truly knows Brahman who knows Him as beyond knowledge; he who thinks that he knows, knows not. The ignorant think that Brahman is known, but the wise know Him to be beyond knowledge.





Hinduism 4108 | 
Kena Upanishad 2.1-3 







P ractice fasting and austerities to clear your channels of the heart, cleanse the quintessential-and-daemonic in you, smash to pieces your knowledge




Daoism 4026 | 
Zhuangzi, chap.22 (shool of Tchuang Tzu), trad. A.C. Graham, 1981, p.132 







T hose who think that wisdom is nothing other than that which is comprehensible by the understanding, that happiness is nothing else than what they can attain, are quite far from the true eternal and infinite wisdom.

The highest wisdom consists in this, to know ...how That which is unattainable [by the intellect] may be reached or attained in a manner beyond [intellectual] attainment.





Christianity / Catholicism 3830 | 
De sapientia; Dolan, 1962; pp. 108 and 105 







R eason strives for knowledge and yet this natural striving is not adequate to the knowledge of the Essence of God, but only to the knowledge that God ... is beyond all conception and knowledge.




Christianity / Catholicism 3828 | 
De venatione sapientiae, Ch. xii; Beek, 1969; p. 64 







I t cannot be spoken of or spoken to; by no means may It be comprehended by the intellect.




Hinduism 3806 | 
Changadev Pasashti, Abhayananda, 1989; pp. 237- 24 







A s for the theorists and thinkers, and the scholastic theologians, with their talk about the soul and its properties, none of them have grasped the Reality; such speculation can never grasp it. He who seeks to know the Reality through theoretical speculation is flogging a dead horse; ... for he who seeks to know It by any means other than the one proper to It, will never grasp It.




Islam / Sufism 3786 | 
in Austin, 1980; pp. 153 







O Lord! who can come near to understanding That which is above the sphere of the Intelligence, the Throne of Thy glory, the glorious dwelling of the Hiding Place! There is the Mystery and the Foundation; the intellect may reach to the Foundation (the Will), but no further, for above this Thou art greatly exalted upon Thy mighty Throne, where no man's intellect may reach…




Judaism 3772 | 
The Royal Crown; Zangwill, 1923, 1974; pp. 82-88 







T hou art Light, and the eyes of every pure soul shall see Thee; for the clouds of iniquity alone hide Thee from her sight... Thou art most high, and the eye of the intellect desireth and longeth for Thee, but the intellect can see only a part; it cannot see the whole of Thy greatness…




Judaism 3769 | 
The Royal Crown; Zangwill, 1923, 1974; pp. 82-88 







W ordiness and intellection.
The more with them the further astray we go;
Away, therefore, with wordiness and intellection,
And there is no place where we cannot pass freely.





Buddhism / Mahayana / Zen (Chan) 3755 | 
Hsin-hsin ming “Inscription on the Self of the Self”, Suzuki, 1960, pp. 76-82 







Y ou are the ultimate Reality; have no doubt about this.
The Self is not something to be known by the mind;
The Self is the very one who knows.
How, then, could you think to know the Self?





Hinduism 3726 | 
#42, Reprinted from Abhayananda, S., Dattatreya: The Song Of The Avadhut, Olympia, Wash., Atma Books, 1992 







D o thou, dear Timothy, in the diligent exercise of mystical contemplation, leave behind the senses and the operations of the intellect, and all things sensible and intellectual, and all things in the world of being and non-being, that thou mayest arise by unknowing towards the union, as far as is attainable, with Him who transcends all being and all knowledge. For by the unceasing and absolute renunciation of thyself and of all things, thou mayest be borne on high, through pure and entire self-abnegation, into the superessential radiance of the divine Darkness.




Christianity 3673 | 
Mystical Theology, I.; Editors of The Shrine Of Wisdom, 1965; P. 10 







T he higher we soar in contemplation, the more limited become our expressions of that which is purely intelligible; even as now, when plunging into the Darkness which is above the intellect, we pass not merely into brevity of speech, but even into absolute silence, of thoughts as well as of words ... and, according to the degree of transcendence, so our speech is restrained until, the entire ascent being accomplished, we become wholly voiceless, inasmuch as we are absorbed in Him who is totally ineffable.




Christianity 3672 | 
Mystical Theology, III.; Editors of The Shrine Of Wisdom, 1965; P. 14 







T he soul must forget about {understanding}, and abandon itself into the arms of love, and His Majesty will teach it what to do next..




Christianity / Catholicism 3475 | 
Interior Castle. Trans. E. Allison Peers. New York: Bantam Doubleday Dell Publishing Group, Inc., 1990, p. 90, Fourth Mansions, Chapter 3, Paragraph 8 







L et {the soul} try, without forcing itself or causing any turmoil, to put a stop to all discursive reasoning, yet not to suspend the understanding, nor to cease from all thought, though it is well for it to remember that is is in God's presence and Who this God is. If feeling this should lead it into a state of absorption, well and good; but it should not try to understand what this state is, because that is a gift bestowed upon the will. The will, then, should be left to enjoy it, and should not labour except for uttering a few loving words, for although in such a case one may not be striving to cease from thought, such cessation often comes, though for a very short time.




Christianity / Catholicism 3473 | 
Interior Castle. Trans. E. Allison Peers. New York: Bantam Doubleday Dell Publishing Group, Inc., 1990, pp. 89-90, Fourth Mansions, Chapter 3, Paragraph 7 







A mong all created things, and things that can be apprehended by the understanding, there is no ladder whereby the understanding can attain to this high Lord.




Christianity / Catholicism 3460 | 
Ascent of Mount Carmel. Trans. E. Allison Peers, Book 2, Chapter 8, Paragraph 7 







I n order to come to union with the wisdom of God, the soul has to proceed rather by unknowing than by knowing…




Christianity / Catholicism 3459 | 
Ascent of Mount Carmel. Trans. E. Allison Peers, Book 1, Chapter 4, Paragraph 5 







A nd immediately upon presenting himself to the soul, God likewise discloses himself and expands the soul and gives it gifts and consolations which the soul has never before experienced, and which are far more profound than earlier ones. In this state, the soul is drawn out of all darkness and granted a greater awareness of God than I would have thought possible. This awareness is of such clarity, certitude, and abysmal profundity that there is no heart in the world that can ever in any way understand it or even conceive it. Even my own heart cannot think about it by itself, or ever return to it to understand or even conceive anything about it. This state occurs only when God, as a gift, elevates the soul to himself, for no heart by itself can in any way expand itself to attain it. Therefore, there is absolutely nothing that can be said about this experience, for no words can be found or invented to express or explain it; no expansion of thought or mind can possibly reach to those things, they are so far beyond everything -- for there is nothing which can explain God. I repeat there is absolutely nothing which can explain God. Christ's faithful one affirmed with utmost certitude and wanted it understood that there is absolutely nothing which can explain God.




Christianity / Catholicism 3443 | 
Complete Works. Mahwah, New Jersey: Paulist Press, 1993, p. 213 







N o matter how far the understanding of the soul is able to stretch itself, that is nothing in comparison to what it experiences when it is lifted beyond itself and placed in the bosom of God. Then the soul understands, finds its delight, and rests in the divine goodness; it cannot bring back any report of this, because it is completely beyond what the intelligence can conceive, and beyond words; but in this state the soul swims.




Christianity / Catholicism 3442 | 
Complete Works. Mahwah, New Jersey: Paulist Press, 1993, p. 208 







W e think we will receive the full knowledge of God's truth by means of worldly wisdom, and fancy that this mere reading of the God-inspired writings of the saints is to comprehend Orthodoxy, and that this is an exact and certain knowlege of the Holy Trinity. Nor is this all, but the more august among us foolishly suppose that the contemplation which comes to pass only through the Spirit in those who are worthy is the same as the thoughts produced by beir own reasoning. How ridiculous! How callous!




Christianity / Orthodoxy 3413 | 
On the Mystical Life : The Ethical Discourses. Trans. Alexander Golitzin. Crestwood, NY: St. Vladimir's Seminary Press, 1996,(Vol. 2), p. 113 







B ut neither should you try to seize {God} with the hands of your intellect, for He is ungraspable, and the more you make bold to touch Him or fancy that you hold Him, the more you will have nothing inside and He will immediately disappear from you entirely.




Christianity / Orthodoxy 3412 | 
On the Mystical Life : The Ethical Discourses. Trans. Alexander Golitzin. Crestwood, NY: St. Vladimir's Seminary Press, 1996,(Vol. 2), p. 136 







B ecause every thought enters the heart in the form of a mental image of some sensible object, the blessed light of the Divinity will illumine the heart only when the heart is completely empty of everything and so free from all form. Indeed, this light reveals itself to the pure intellect in the measure to which the intellect is purged of all concepts.




Christianity / Orthodoxy 3379 | 
On Watchfulness and Holiness: ("Philokalia (Vol. 1)", p. 177, text 89) 







I f the intellect has not risen above the contemplation of the created world, it has not yet beheld the realm of God perfectly. For it may be occupied with the knowledge of intelligible things and so involved in their mulitplicity.




Christianity / Orthodoxy 3371 | 
On Prayer: ("Philokalia (Vol. 1)", p. 62, text 58) 







T he soul can attain to the secrecy which is in God, where the mystery of unity beyond understanding and speech is celebrated, only when it has gone not only beyond the categories of vice and ignorance and of falsehood and wickedness - the vices which are opposite to virtue and knowledge and truth and goodness - but even, if one may say this, beyond the categories of virtue itself and of knowledge and truth and goodness as they are known to us. In the Kingdom of the Spirit of God, which lies beyond our senses and intellectual concepts and virtues, everything exists in a different way. It exists truly.




Christianity / Orthodoxy 3369 | 
Hymn of Entry, p. 102 







A bba Ammoun of Rhaithou asked Abba Sisoes, "When I read the Scriptures, my mind is wholly concentrated on the words so that I may have something to say if I am asked." The old man said to him, "That is not necessary; it is better to enrich yourself through purity of spirit and to be without anxiety and then to speak."




Christianity 3351 | 
Abba Sisoes: The sayings of the Desert Fathers : the alphabetical collection. Trans. Benedicta Ward, SLG. Kalamazoo, Michigan: Cistercian Publications Inc., 1984, 1975, p. 216, Abba Sisoes 17 







I ntellect is good and desirable to the extent it brings you to the King's door. Once you have reached His door, then divorce the intellect! From this time on, the intellect will be to your loss and a brigand. When you reach Him, entrust yourself to Him! You have no business with the how and the wherefore. Know that the intellect's cleverness all belongs to the vestibule. Even if it possesses the knowledge of Plato, it is still outside of the palace.




Islam / Sufism 3300 | 
The Sufi Path of Love: The Spiritual Teachings of Rumi, p. 222, Trans. William C. Chittick. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1983 







Y ou seek knowledge from books. What a shame! …
You are an ocean of knowledge hidden in a dew drop…





Islam / Sufism 3299 | 
The Sufi Path of Love: The Spiritual Teachings of Rumi, p. 64, Trans. William C. Chittick. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1983 







T hat intellectual warp and woof keeps you wrapped in blindness.




Islam / Sufism 3297 | 
The Essential Rumi, p. 66, Trans. Coleman Barks with John Moyne. New York: HarperCollins Publishers, 1995 







H is mental questionings form the barrier. His physical eyesight bandages his knowing. Self-consciousness plugs his ears.




Islam / Sufism 3296 | 
The Essential Rumi, p. 256, Trans. Coleman Barks with John Moyne. New York: HarperCollins Publishers, 1995 







Y our Saying "God is Most Great" does not mean that He is greater than something else, since there is nothing else alongside of Him, so that it could be said that He is greater than it… Rather, the meaning of Allahu Akbar is that He is much too great to be perceived by the senses or for the depths of His Majesty to be reached by reason and logic, and indeed, that He is much too great to be known by an other-than-Him for truly, no one knows God but God.




Islam / Sufism 3276 | 
The Key To Salvation: A Sufi Manual of Invocation. Trans. Mary Ann Koury Danner. Cambridge: The Islamic Texts Society, 1996, p. 119 







T he truth of the Self cannot come through one who has not realized that he is the Self. The intellect cannot reveal the Self, beyond its duality of subject and object. They who see themselves in all and all in them help others through spiritual osmosis to realize the Self themselves. This awakening you have known comes not through logic and scholarship, but from close association with a realized teacher.




Hinduism 3222 | 
Katha Up. Part 1, 2:9, p. 85 in The Upanishads. Trans. Eknath Easwaran. Tomales, CA.: Nilgiri Press, 1987 







B right but hidden, the Self dwells in the heart. Everything that moves, breathes, opens, and closes lives in the Self. He is the source of love and may be known through love but not through thought. He is the goal of life. Attain this goal!




Hinduism 3211 | 
Mundaka Up. Part 2, 2:1, p. 113 in The Upanishads. Trans. Eknath Easwaran. Tomales, CA.: Nilgiri Press, 1987 







T he ignorant think the Self can be known by the intellect, but the illumined know he is beyond the duality of the knower and the known.




Hinduism 3210 | 
Kena Up. 2:3, pp. 69-70 in The Upanishads. Trans. Eknath Easwaran. Tomales, CA.: Nilgiri Press, 1987 







G irish:
Narendra says that God is beyond our words and thought.
Ramakrishna:
That is not altogether true. He is, no doubt, unknowable by this ordinary mind, but He can indeed be known by the pure mind. The mind and intellect become pure the moment they are free from attachment…





Hinduism 3177 | 
Mahendranath Gupta. The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna. Trans. Swami Nikhilananda. New York: Ramakrishna-Vivekananda Center, 1942, 1948, 1958, p. 372 







O ne cannot get true feeling about God from the study of books. This feeling is something very different from book-learning. Books, the scriptures, and science appear as mere dirt and straw after the realization of God.




Hinduism 3176 | 
Mahendranath Gupta. The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna. Trans. Swami Nikhilananda. New York: Ramakrishna-Vivekananda Center, 1942, 1948, 1958, p. 353 







W hat will a man gain by merely reasoning about the words of the scriptures? Ah, the fools! They reason themselves to death over information about the path. They never take the plunge. What a pity!




Hinduism 3175 | 
Mahendranath Gupta. The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna. Trans. Swami Nikhilananda. New York: Ramakrishna-Vivekananda Center, 1942, 1948, 1958, p. 332 







O n my first journey I found a kind of knowledge acceptable to both the elect and the common folk, on the second, knowledge acceptable to the elect and not the common folk, and on the third, knowledge acceptable to neither the elect nor the common folk; thus I remained an outcast and alone.
The first kind of knowledge was repentance, which both the elect and the common folk accept, the second was trust in God and fellowship with Him and love, which the elect accept, and the third was the knowledge of reality, which is beyond the power of human learning and reason to attain, so men reject it.





Islam / Sufism 2970 | 
Essential Sufism, by James Fadiman & Robert Frager, Harper SanFrancisco, p.110 







I 've given up on my brain.
I've torn the cloth to shreds
and thrown it away.

If you're not completely naked,
wrap your beautiful robe of words
around you,

and sleep.





Islam / Sufism 2930 | 
Essential Sufism, by James Fadiman & Robert Frager, Harper SanFrancisco, p.116 







H ere our reason and every activity characterized by the making of distinctions must give way, for our powers now become simply one in love, grow silent, and incline toward the Father's face, since this revelation of the Father raises the soul above reason to a state of imageless bareness. There the soul is simple, spotless, and pure, empty of everything. In this pure emptiness the Father reveals his divine resplendence, which neither reason nor senses, neither rational observation nor distinctions can attain.




Christianity 2828 | 
John Ruusbroec, adapted from John Ruusbroec: The Spritual Espousals and Other Works, translated by James Wiseman (Mahwah, N.J.: Paulist Press, 1985) 







A fterward, I saw him in a darkness, and in a darkness precisely because the good that he is, is far too great to be conceived or understood. Indeed, anything conceivable or understandable does not attain this good or even come near it.




Christianity / Catholicism 2817 | 
Angela of Foligno, from Angela of Foligno: Complete Works, translated by Paul Lachance (Mahwah, N.J.: Paulist Press,1993). 







L eave the senses and the workings of the intellect, and all that the sense and the intellect can perceive, and all that is not and that is; and through unknowing reach out, so far as this is possible, toward oneness with him who is beyond all being and knowledge. In this way, through an uncompromising, absolute, and pure detachment from yourself and from all things, transcending all things and released from all, you will be led upwards toward that radiance of the divine darkness that is beyond all being.

Entering the darkness that surpasses understanding, we shall find ourselves brought, not just to brevity of speech, but to perfect silence and unknowing.

Emptied of all knowledge, man is joined in the highest part of himself, not with any created thing, nor with himself, nor with another, but with the one who is altogether
unknowable; and in knowing nothing, he knows in a manner that surpasses understanding.





Christianity 2804 | 
Dionysius the Areopagite, adapted from the translation of the Mystical Theology by Colm Luibheid in Pseudo-Dionysius: The Complete Works (Mahwah, New Jersey: Paulist Press). 







B ut as the soul makes progress, and by a greater and more perfect concentration comes to appreciate what the knowledge of truth is, the more it approaches this vision, and so much the more does it see that the divine nature is invisible. It thus leaves all surface appearances, not only those that can be grasped by the senses but also those that the mind itself seems to see, and it keeps on going deeper until by the operation of the spirit it penetrates the invisible and incomprehensible, and it is there that it sees God. The true vision and the true knowledge of what we seek consists precisely in not seeing, in an awareness that our goal transcends all knowledge and is everywhere cut off from us by the darkness of incomprehensibility. Thus that profound evangelist, John, who penetrated into this luminous darkness, tells us that no man hath seen God at any time (John 1:18), teaching us by this negation that no man - indeed, no created intellect - can attain knowledge of God.




Christianity 2799 | 
Gregory of Nyssa, from Gregory of Nyssa's Mystical Writings, translated and edited by Herbert Mursillo (Crestwood, N.Y.: St. V1adimir's Seminary Press, 1979). 







N ot through discourse, not through the intellect,
Not even through study of the scriptures
Can the Self be realized. The Self reveals
Himself to the one who longs for the Self.
Those who long for the Self with all their heart
Are chosen by the Self as his own.

Not by the weak, not by the unearnest,
Not by those who practice wrong disciplines
Can the Self be realized. The Self reveals
Himself as the Lord of Love to the one
Who practices right disciplines.





Hinduism 2653 | 
Mundaka Upanishad, translated by Eknath Easwaran, 1987; Nilgiri Press, Tomales, California 







S elf-realization is an exalted state of inner attainment which transcends all dualistic thinking and which is above the mind-system with its logic, reasoning, theorizing, and illustrations.




Buddhism / Mahayana 2581 | 
Ch.IV, p.311, in Dwight Goddard, A Buddhist bible 







B ut the way of instruction presented by the Tathagatas is not based on assertions and refutations by means of words and logic.




Buddhism / Mahayana 2543 | 
Ch.II, p.284, in Dwight Goddard, A Buddhist bible 







S tudents of today only pay attention to details and do not search for what is concrete. […]
When is it necessary to depend on words?" […]
When scholars read today, they only try to understand words and do not go further to find out what is vital.





Confucianism / Neo Confucianism 2410 | 
Complete Work of Lu Hsiang-shan (Hsiang-shan ch’uan-chi), 35:10a-b, in Wing-Tsit Chan, Chinese Philosophy, Chapter 33 







A student must make up his mind. To read book and merely understand their literate meanings means not to have made up one’s mind.




Confucianism / Neo Confucianism 2408 | 
Complete Work of Lu Hsiang-shan (Hsiang-shan ch’uan-chi), 35:1b, in Wing-Tsit Chan, Chinese Philosophy, Chapter 33 







T here is nothing that is not the "that" and there is nothing that is the "this." Things do not know that they are the "that" of they only know what they themselves know. Therefore "that" is produced by the "this" and the "this" is also caused by the “that." This is the theory of mutual production. (1) Nevertheless, when there is life there is death, (2) and when there is death there is life. When there is possibility, there is impossibility, and when there is impossibility, there is possibility. Because of the right, there is the wrong, and because of the wrong, there is the right. Therefore the sage does not proceed among these lines (of right and wrong, and so forth) but illuminates the matter with Nature. This is the reason.




Daoism 2219 | 
Chuang Tzu, chapter II, in Wing-Tsit Chan, Chinese Philosophy, Chapter 8. 





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