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Buddha Sakyamuni



Teachings of Buddha Sakyamuni

110  quote(s)  | Page 2 / 5




T here is, monks, a condition where there is neither the element of extension, the element of cohesion, the element of heat, nor the element of motion, nor the sphere of the infinity of space, nor the sphere of the infinity of consciousness, nor the sphere of nothingness, nor the sphere of neither-perception-nor-non-perception; neither this world, nor a world beyond, nor sun and moon.
There, monks, I say, there is neither coming nor going nor staying nor passing away nor arising. Without support or mobility or basis is it. This is indeed the end of suffering.

That which is Selfless, hard it is to see;
Not easy is it to perceive the Truth.
But who has ended craving utterly
Has naught to cling to, he alone can see.

There is, monks, an unborn, a not-become, a not-made, a not-compounded. If, monks, there were not this unborn, not-become, not-made, not-compounded, there would not here be an escape from the born, the become, the made, the compounded. But because there is an unborn, a not-become, a not-made, a not-compounded, therefore there is an escape from the born, the become, the made, the compounded.





Buddhism Quote n4089 | 
Udana 80, Pataligama 





I entered on, and abode in, the First Ecstasy.-Yet, such pleasant feelings as then arose in me did not take possession of my mind; nor did they as I successively entered on, and abode in, the Second, Third, and Fourth Ecstasies




Buddhism Quote n3964 | 
Majjhima-nikaya, XXXVI [Maha-saccaka-sutra], Translation by Lord ChaImers, Further Dialogues of the, Buddha, I (London, 1926), pp. 17.4-7 





F or the Tath-a gata has seen the triple world as it really is: It is not born, it dies not there is no decease or rebirth, no Samsara- or Nirvana; it is not real or unreal, not existent, or non-existent, not such, or otherwise, no false or not-false.




Buddhism Quote n3915 | 
Saddharmapundarika, XV, 268-72, Translation by Edwin Conze, in Conze, et al., Buddhist Texts through the Ages (Oxford: Bruno Cassirer. 1954) 





T herefore I say, the Perfect One has won complete deliverance through the extinction, fading-away, disappearance, rejection, and getting rid of all opinions and conjectures, of all inclination to the vain-glory of `I' and `mine'.




Buddhism Quote n3536 | 
Majjhima Nikaya, 72 





A t a time, o Monks, when the monk thus trains himself
Perceiving impermanence will I breathe in, perceiving impermanence will I breathe out'; 'rejecting attraction will I breathe in, rejecting attraction will I breathe out'; 'perceiving eradication will I breathe in, perceiving eradication will I breathe out'; perceiving estrangement will I breathe in, perceiving, estrangement will I breathe out': at such a time, o Monks, a monk examining phenomena observes phenomena, unremittingly, with perspicacity and insight, after having conquered worldly desires and worry. And he recognizes with wisdom, how worldly desires and worry are being overcome, and attains peace.





Buddhism Quote n2511 | 
118th Discourse, in Dwight Goddard, A Buddhist bible, p. 78 





A t a time, o Monks, when the monk thus trains himself:
Perceiving the thoughts will I breathe in, perceiving the thoughts will I breathe out'; enlivening the thoughts will I breathe in, enlivening the thoughts will I breathe out'; 'concentrating the thoughts will I breathe in, concentrating the thoughts will I breathe out'; 'dissolving the thoughts will I breathe in, dissolving the thoughts will I breathe out': at such a time, o Monks, a monk examining thoughts observes the thoughts, unremittingly, with perspicacity and insight, after having conquered worldly desires and worry.





Buddhism Quote n2510 | 
118th Discourse, in Dwight Goddard, A Buddhist bible, p. 78 





B ut how, o Monks, must inhalation and exhalation be practiced and cultivated introspectively in order to establish the Four Foundations of Introspection?
"At a time, o Monks, when the monk drawing in a long breath knows 'I am drawing in a long breath,' exhaling a long breath knows 'I am exhaling a long breath,' drawing in a short breath knows 'I am drawing in a short breath' exhaling a short breath knows 'I am exhaling a short breath'; 'Perceiving the whole body will I breathe in, perceiving the whole body will 1 breathe out,' thus trains himself; 'Calming down this body compound will I breathe in, calming down this body compound will 1 breathe out,' thus trains himself; at such a time, o Monks, the monk examining the body observes the body, unremittingly, with perspicacity and insight, after having conquered worldly desires and worry. I call this, o Monks, a transformation of the body, namely inhalation and exhalation. Thus, therefore, o Monks, at such a time, the monk examining the body observes the body, unremittingly, with perspicacity and insight, after having conquered worldly desires and worry.





Buddhism Quote n2509 | 
118th Discourse, in Dwight Goddard, A Buddhist bible, p. 77 





B ut how, o Monks, must inhalation and exhalation be practiced and cultivated introspectively that it causes high recompense, high advancement?
"A monk, o Monks, goes into a forest, or to the foot of a great tree, or to a lonely place, and there sits down, cross-legged, holding his body upright, and practices Introspection.
"He breathes in attentively, and attentively breathes out.





Buddhism Quote n2508 | 
118th Discourse, in Dwight Goddard, A Buddhist bible, p. 76 





T here are, o Monks, among these disciples some monks, who persevere assiduously as conquerors of introspective breathing exercises. Inhalation and exhalation, o Monks, practiced and cultivated introspectively causes the attainment of high recompense, of high advancement. Inhalation and exhalation, o Monks, practiced and cultivated introspectively causes the unfoldment of the Four Foundations of Introspection; the Four Foundations of Introspection, practiced and cultivated assiduously, cause the enfoldment of the Seven Factors of Enlightenment; the Seven Factors of Enlightenment, practiced and cultivated introspectively, cause the enfoldment of Knowledge that liberates.




Buddhism Quote n2507 | 
118th Discourse, in Dwight Goddard, A Buddhist bible, p 75 





I am is a vain thought;
I am not is a vain thought;
I shall be is a vain thought;
I shall not be is a vain thought.





Buddhism Quote n2506 | 
Majjhima Nikaya, 140 





A nd his heart becomes free from sensual passion, free from the passion for existence free from the passion of ignorance. Freed am I : this knowledge arises in the liberated one; and he knows: Exhausted is rebirth, fulfilled the Holy Life; what was to be done, has been done; naught remains more for this world to do.




Buddhism Quote n2505 | 
Anguttara Nikaya, IV. 198 





B ut whatsoever there is of feeling, perception, mental formations, or consciousness : all these phenomena he regards as impermanent, subject to pain, as infirm, as an ulcer, a thorn, a misery, a burden, an enemy, a disturbance, as empty and void of an Ego; and turning away from these things, he directs his mind towards the abiding, thus: This, verily, is the Peace, this is the Highest, namely the end of all formations, the forsaking of every substratum of rebirth, the fading away of craving, detachment, extinction, Nibbana. And in this state he reaches the cessation of passions.




Buddhism Quote n2504 | 
Anguttara Nikaya, IX. 36 





S uppose, a householder, or his son, or someone reborn in any family hears the law, and after hearing the law he is filled with confidence in the Perfect One. And filled with this confidence, he thinks: Full of hindrances is household life, a refuse heap; but pilgrim life is like the open air. Not easy is it, when one lives at home, to fulfill point by point the rules of the holy life. How, if now I were to cut off hair and beard, put on the yellow robe and go forth from home to the homeless life? And in a short time, having given up his more or less extensive possessions, having forsaken a smaller or larger circle of relations, he cuts off hair and beard, puts on the yellow robe, and goes forth from home to the homeless life.

Having thus left the world, he fulfills the rules of the monks. He avoids the killing of living beings and abstains from I. Without stick or sword, conscientious, full of sympathy, he is anxious for the welfare of all living beings. He avoids stealing and abstains from taking what is not given to him. Only what is given to him he takes, waiting till it is given; and he lives with a heart honest and pure. He avoids unchastity, living chaste, resigned, and keeping aloof from sexual intercourse and the vulgar He avoids lying and abstains from I. He speaks the truth, is devoted to the truth, reliable, worthy of confidence, is not a deceiver of men. He avoids tale-bearing, and abstains from I. What he has heard here, he does not repeat there, so as to cause dissension there; and what he has heard there, he does not repeat here, so as to cause dissension here. Thus he unites those that are divided, and those that are united he encourages; concord gladdens him, he delights and rejoices in concord; and it is concord that he spreads by his words. He avoids harsh language and abstains from I. He speaks such words as are gentle, soothing to the ear, loving, going to the heart, courteous and dear, and agreeable to many. -He avoids vain talk and abstains from I. He speaks at the right time, in accordance with facts, speaks what is useful, speaks about the law and the discipline; his speech is like a treasure, at the right moment accompanied by arguments, moderate, and full of sense.
He keeps aloof from dance, song, music and the visiting of shows; rejects flowers, perfumes, ointment, as well as every kind of adornment and embellishment. High and gorgeous beds he does not use. Raw corn and meat he does not accept. Women and girls he does not accept. He owns no male and female slaves, owns no goats, sheep, fowls, pigs, elephants, cows or horses, no land and goods. He does not go on errands and do the duties of a messenger. He keeps aloof from buying and selling things. He has nothing to do with false measures, metals and weights. He avoids crooked ways of bribery, deception and fraud. He keeps aloof from stabbing, beating, chaining, attacking, plundering and oppressing.
He contents himself with the robe that protects his body, and with the alms with which he keeps himself alive. Wherever he goes he is him. By fulfilling this noble Domain of Morality he feels in his heart an irreproachable happiness.
Now, in perceiving a form with the eye-a sound with the ear-an odor with the nose-a taste with the tongue-a touch with the body-an object with his mind, he sticks neither to the whole, nor to its details. And he tries to ward off that, which, by being unguarded in his senses, might give rise to evil and demeritorious states, to greed and sorrow; he watches over his senses, keeps his senses under control. By practicing - this noble Control of the Senses he feels in his heart an unblemished happiness.
Clearly conscious is he in his going and coming; clearly conscious in looking forward and backward; clearly conscious in bending and stretching his body; clearly conscious in eating, drinking, chewing and tasting; clearly conscious in discharging excrement and urine; clearly conscious in walking, standing, sitting, falling asleep and awakening; clearly conscious in speaking and keeping silent.
Now, being equipped with this lofty Morality, equipped with this noble Control of the Senses, and filled with this noble Attentiveness and Clear Consciousness, he chooses a secluded dwelling in the forest, at the foot of a tree, on a mountain, in a cleft, in a rock cave, on a burial ground, on a woody table-land, in the open air, or on a heap of straw. Having returned from his alms round, he, after the meal, sits himself down with legs crossed, body erect, with attentiveness fixed before him.
He has cast away Lust; he dwells with a heart free from lust; from lust he cleanses his heart.
He has cast away Ill-will; he dwells with a heart free from ill-will; cherishing love and compassion toward all living beings, he cleanses his heart from ill-will.
He has cast away Torpor and Dullness; he dwells free from torpor and dullness; loving the light, with watchful mind, with clear consciousness, he cleanses his mind from torpor and dullness.
He has cast away Restlessness and Mental Worry; dwelling with mind undisturbed, with heart full of peace, he cleanses his mind from restlessness and mental worry.
He has cast away Doubt; dwelling free from doubt, full of confidence in the good, he cleanses his heart from doubt.
He has put aside these five Hindrances and learnt to know the paralyzing corruptions of the mind And far from sensual impressions, far from demeritorious things he enters into the Four Trances.





Buddhism Quote n2503 | 
Anguttara Nikaya, IV. 198 





W hat now is Right Attentiveness? []
- Whenever the disciple is training himself to inhale or exhale (a) whilst feeling the mind, or (b) whilst gladdening the mind, or whilst concentrating the mind, or (d) whilst setting the mind free-at such a time he is dwelling in contemplation of the mind, full of energy, clearly conscious, attentive, after subduing worldly greed and grief. For, without attentiveness and clear consciousness, I say, there is no Watching over In- and Out-breathing.





Buddhism Quote n2502 | 
Majjhima Nikaya, 118, 3. 





W hat now is Right Attentiveness? []
- Whenever the disciple is training himself to inhale or exhale (a) whilst feeling, rapture, or (b) joy, or the mental functions, or (d) whilst calming down the mental functions. At such a time he is dwelling in contemplation of the feelings, full of energy, clearly conscious, attentive after subduing worldly greed and grief. For, the full awareness of in- and out breathing I call one amongst the feelings.





Buddhism Quote n2501 | 
Majjhima Nikaya, 118, 2. 





W hat now is Right Attentiveness? []
- Whenever the disciple (a) is conscious in making a long inhalation or exhalation, or (b) in making a short inhalation or exhalation, or c) is training himself to inhale or exhale whilst feeling the whole (breath-) body, or (d) whilst calming down this bodily function (i.e. the breath)-at such a time the disciple is dwelling in contemplation of the body, full of energy, clearly conscious, attentive, after subduing worldly greed and grief. For, inhalation and exhalation I call one amongst the bodily things.





Buddhism Quote n2500 | 
Majjhima Nikaya, 118, 1. 





O nce the contemplation of the body is practiced, developed, often repeated, has become one's habit, one's foundation, is firmly established, strengthened and well perfected, one may expect ten blessings:
Over Delight and Discontent one has mastery; one does not Allow one's self to be overcome by discontent; one subdues it as soon as it arises.
One conquers Fear and Anxiety; one does not allow one's self to be overcome by fear and anxiety; one subdues them as soon as they arise.
One endures cold and heat, hunger and thirst, wind and sun, attacks by gadflies, mosquitoes and reptiles; patiently one (endures wicked and malicious speech, as well as bodily pains, that befall one, though they be piercing, sharp, bitter, unpleasant, disagreeable and dangerous to life.
The four Trances, the mind-purifying, bestowing happiness even here: these one may enjoy at will, without difficulty, without effort.
(1) One may enjoy the different Magical Powers.
(2) With the Heavenly Ear the purified, the
super-human, one may hear both kinds of sounds, the heavenly
and the earthly, the distant and the near.
(3) With the mind one may obtain Insight into the Hearts of Other Beings of other persons.
(4) One may obtain Remembrance of many Previous Births
(5) With the Heavenly Eye the purified, the super-human, one may see beings vanish and reappear, the base and the noble, the beautiful and the ugly, the happy and the unfortunate; one may perceive how beings are reborn according to their deeds.
(6) One may, through the Cessation of Passions, come to know for oneself, even in this life, the stainless deliverance of mind, the deliverance through wisdom.





Buddhism Quote n2498 | 
Majjhima Nikaya, 119 





W hat now is Right Attentiveness? []
- And further, the disciple is clearly conscious in his going and coming; clearly conscious in looking forward and backward, clearly conscious in bending and stretching (any part of hi body); clearly conscious in eating, drinking, chewing and tasting: clearly conscious in discharging excrement and urine, clearly conscious in walking, standing, sitting, falling asleep and awakening; clearly conscious in speaking and in keeping silent.





Buddhism Quote n2497 | 
Digha Nikaya, 22 





W hat now is Right Attentiveness? []
- But how does the disciple dwell in the contemplation of the body? There the disciple retires to the forest, to the foot of a tree, or to a solitary place, sits himself down, with legs crossed, body erect, and with attentiveness fixed before him.
With attentive mind he breathes in, with attentive mind he breathes out. When making a long inhalation, he knows: I make a long inhalation; when making a long exhalation, he knows: I make a long exhalation. When making a short inhalation, he knows: I make a short inhalation; when making a short exhalation, he knows: I make a short exhalation. Clearly perceiving the entire (breath-) body, I will breathe out: thus he trains himself. Calming this bodily function, (kaya-sankhara), I will breathe in: thus he trains himself; calming this bodily function, I will breathe out: thus he trains himself.





Buddhism Quote n2496 | 
Digha Nikaya, 22 





W hat now is Right Attentiveness?
- The only way that leads to the attainment of purity, to the overcoming of sorrow and lamentation, to the end of pain and grief, to the entering upon the right path and the realization of Nibbana, is the Four Fundamentals of Attentiveness. And which are these four?
There the disciple lives in contemplation of the Body, in contemplation of Feeling, in contemplation of the Mind, in contemplation of Phenomena, ardent, clearly conscious and attentive, after putting away worldly greed and grief.





Buddhism Quote n2495 | 
Digha Nikaya, 22 





W hat now is Right Effort? []
-The effort of avoiding, overcoming,
Of developing and maintaining:
Such four great efforts have been shown
By him, the scion of the sun.
And he who firmly clings to them
May put an end to all the pain.





Buddhism Quote n2494 | 
Anguttara Nikaya, IV. 14 





W hat now is Right Effort? []
-Truly the disciple, who is possessed of faith and has penetrated the Teaching of the Master, is filled with the thought; May rather skin, sinews and bones wither away, may the flesh and blood of my body dry up; I shall not give up my efforts so long as I have not attained whatever is attainable by manly perseverance, energy and endeavour! This is called right effort.





Buddhism Quote n2493 | 
Majjhima Nikaya, 70 





W hat now is Right Effort? []
What now is the effort to develop?
There the disciple incites his will to arouse meritorious conditions, that have not yet arisen; and he strives, puts forth his energy, strains his mind and struggles.
Thus he develops the Elements of Enlightenment (bojjhanga), bent on solitude, on detachment, on extinction, and ending in deliverance, namely: Attentiveness, Investigation of the Law, Energy, Rapture, Tranquility, Concentration, and Equanimity.





Buddhism Quote n2492 | 
Anguttara Nikaya, IV.13,14 (3) 





I f, whilst regarding a certain object, there arise, account of it, in the disciple evil and demeritorious thoughts connected with greed, anger and delusion, then the disciple should, by means of this object, gain another and wholesome object. Or, he should reflect on the misery of these thoughts: Unwholesome truly are these thoughts! Blamable are these thoughts! Of painful result are these thoughts. Or, he should pay no attention to these thoughts. Or, he should consider the compounded nature of these thoughts.
Or, with teeth clenched and tongue pressed against the gums he should with his mind restrain, suppress and root out these thoughts; and in doing so, these evil and demeritorious thoughts of greed, anger and delusion will dissolve and disappear, and the mind will inwardly become settled and calm, composed and concentrated.





Buddhism Quote n2491 | 
Majjhima Nikaya, 20 





W hat now is the effort to overcome? There the disciple incites his mind to overcome the evil and demeritorious things, that have already arisen; and he strives, puts forth his energy, strains his mind and struggles.
He does not retain any thought of sensual lust, ill-will or grief, or any other evil and demeritorious states, that may have arisen; he abandons them, dispels them, destroys them, causes them to disappear.





Buddhism Quote n2490 | 
Anguttara Nikaya, V 13,14 



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