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Hinduism
History and dogmas of the hindu religion
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Hinduism : History and dogmas

Hinduism rests on the spiritual bedrock of the Vedas, hence Veda Dharma, and their mystic issue, the Upanishads, as well as the teachings of many great Hindu gurus through the ages. Many streams of thought flow from the six Vedic/Hindu schools, Bhakti sects and Tantra Agamic schools into the one ocean of Hinduism, the first of the Dharma religions.


The Eternal Way


"The Eternal Way" (in Sanskrit ????? ????, Sanatana Dharma), or the "Perennial Philosophy/Harmony/Faith", is the one name that has represented Hinduism for many thousands of years. According to Hindus, it speaks to the idea that certain spiritual principles hold eternally true, transcending man-made constructs, representing a pure science of consciousness. But this consciousness is not merely that of the body or mind and intellect, but of a supramental soul-state that exists within and beyond our existence, the unsullied Self of all. Religion to the Hindu is the native search for the divine within the Self, the search to find the One truth that in actuality never was lost. Truth sought with faith shall yield itself in blissful luminescence no matter the race or creed professed. Indeed, all existence, from vegetation and beasts to mankind, are subjects and objects of the eternal Dharma. This inherent faith, therefore, is also known as Arya/Noble Dharma, Veda/Knowledge Dharma, Yoga/Union Dharma, Hindu Dharma or, simply, the Dharma.
What can be said to be common to all Hindus is belief in Dharma, reincarnation, karma, and moksha (liberation) of every soul through a variety of moral, action-based, and meditative yogas. Still more fundamental principles include ahimsa (non-violence), the primacy of the Guru, the Divine Word of Aum and the power of mantras, love of Truth in many manifestations as Gods and Goddessess, and an understanding that the essential spark of the Divine (Atman/Brahman) is in every human and living being, thus allowing for many spiritual paths leading to the One Unitary Truth.



An example of the pervasiveness of this paramount truth-seeking spirituality in daily life is the bindi (seen left), which is a common marker for Hindu women. It symbolizes the need to cultivate supramental consciousness, which is achieved by opening the mystic "third eye." Hindus across the board stress meditative insight, an intuition beyond the mind and body, a trait that is often associated with the ascetic god Shiva. Men, too, will bear on their foreheads the equivalent tilak mark, usually on religious occasions, its shape often representing particular devotion to a certain main deity: a 'U' shape stands for Vishnu, a group of three lines for Shiva. It is not uncommon for some to meld both in an amalgam marker signifying Hari-Hara (Vishnu-Shiva indissoluble).

Yoga Dharma


Hinduism is practiced through a variety of Yogas (spiritual practices), primarily bhakti (loving devotion), karma Yoga (selfless service), raja yoga (meditational Yoga) and Jnana Yoga (Yoga of discrimination). These are described in the two principal texts of Hindu Yoga: The Bhagavad Gita and the Yoga Sutras. The Upanishads are also very important as a philosophical foundation for this rational spiritualism.

The four goals of life


Another major aspect of Hindu dharma that is common to practically all Hindus is that of purushartha, the "four goals of life". They are kama, artha, dharma and moksha. It is said that all humans seek kama (pleasure, physical or emotional) and artha (power, fame and wealth), but soon, with maturity, learn to govern these legitimate desires within a higher, pragmatic framework of dharma, or moral harmony in all. Of course, the only goal that is truly infinite, whose attainment results in absolute happiness, is moksha, or liberation, (a.k.a. Mukti, Samadhi, Nirvana, etc.) from Samsara, the cycle of life, death, and existential duality.

The four stages of life


The human life is also seen as four Ashramas ("phases" or "stages"). They are Brahmacharya, Grihasthya, Vanaprastha and Sanyasa. The first quarter of one's life, brahmacharya (literally "grazing in Brahma") is spent in celibate, sober and pure contemplation of life's secrets under a Guru, building up body and mind for the responsibilities of life. Grihastya is the householder's stage, alternatively known as samsara, in which one marries and satisfies kama and artha within a married life and professional career. Vanaprastha is gradual detachment from the material world, ostensibly giving over duties to one's sons and daughters, spending more time in contemplation of the truth, and making holy pilgrimages. Finally, in sanyasa, the individual goes off into seclusion, often envisioned as the forest, to find God through Yogic meditation and peacefully shed the body for the next life.


  
  
  
  
  



Hinduism : Art & Paintings


Shiva Indra Brahma
Les Dieux Hindous, Bataille opposant Indra, conduisant son éléphant, et les dieux ultérieur de l'hindouisme, représentés ici par Krishna, le dieu a la peau bleue qui vole sur son aigle Garuda. Brahma aux quatre tetes et Shiva l'ascete sont assis en haut de la toile.
Ramayana
Scenes du Ramayana, Rama et Sita en exil, avec hanuman a leurs pieds. Miniature moghole du XVIIe siecle, National Museum (Delhi)
Ramayana
Scenes du Ramayana, Le siege de Shri Lanka. Miniature moghole du XVIIe siecle, National Museum (Delhi)
Mahabharata
Vyasa apparait comme un sage barbu, dictant le Mahabharata a Ganesha, entre Druga (en haut) et Brahma (en bas).
Mahabharata
Scenes du Mahabharata, l'amour de Krishna pour Rhada symbolise la bhakti. Peinture du XIXe siecle.

Related links


- Hinduism / Kriya Yoga, Hinduism / Tantra, Ashtavakra Gita, Atharva Veda, Aurobindo Ghose, Avadhuta Gita, Bhagavat Gita, Bhakti Sutras, Devi Gita, Jiddu Krishnamurti, Jnaneshwar, Law of Manu, Mahabarata, Muktananda, Paramhansa Yogananda, Patanjali, Ramakrishna, Ramana Maharshi, Ramdas, Ramdasa, Rig Veda, Shankara, Swami Vishnu Devananda, Tantric scriptures, Tukaram, Upanishads, Vishnu Purana, Vishnu Sahasranam, Vivekananda, etc.

Hinduism : Internet Link


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History : Chronology of Hinduism
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