Inter -  Faiths  Dialogue



Interreligious dialogue : The Man > Man's True Nature

Onelittleangel > The Man > Man's True Nature
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O ne day the Fifth Patriarch assembled all his disciples and said to them, "Go and seek for Wisdom in your own mind and then write me a stanza about it. He who understands what the Essence of Mind is will be given the Robe and the Dharma, and I shall make him the Sixth Patriarch. Go away quickly. Delay not in writing the stanza, as deliberation is quite unnecessary and of no use. The man who has realized the Essence of Mind can speak of it at once."

Having received this instruction, the disciples withdrew, but none dared to write a stanza, as they all deferred to the head instructor Shen Hsiu... At 12 o'clock that night Shen Hsiu went secretly with a lamp to write his stanza on the wall of the south corridor, so that the Patriarch might know what spiritual insight he had attained. The stanza read,

Our body is the Bodhi tree,
And our mind a mirror bright,
Carefully we wipe them hour by hour,
And let no dust alight.

...When the Patriarch saw the stanza the next morning, he instructed that it be read and recited by all the disciples, so that they might realize the Essence of Mind. At midnight he sent for Shen Hsiu to come to the hall, and asked him if the stanza was written by him or not. "It was, Sir," replied Shen Hsiu. "I dare not be so vain as to expect to get the Patriarchate, but I wish Your Holiness would kindly tell me whether my stanza shows the least grain of wisdom." "Your stanza," replied the Patriarch, "shows that you have not yet realized the Essence of Mind. So far you have reached the 'door of enlightenment,' but you have not yet entered it. To seek for supreme enlightenment with such an understanding as yours can hardly be successful... You had better go back to think it over again for a couple of days, and submit to me another stanza."

I [Hui Neng] was pounding rice when I heard a young boy reciting the stanza written by Shen Hsiu... I asked him to lead me to the hall and show me the stanza. A petty officer who happened to be there read it out to me. When he had finished reading, I told him that I had also composed a stanza, and asked him to write it on the wall. "Don't despise a beginner," I said. "You should know that the lowest class may have the sharpest wit, while the highest may be in want of intelligence. If you slight others, you commit a very great sin." I dictated my stanza, which read,

There is no Bodhi tree,
Nor stand of a mirror bright.
Since all is void,
Where can the dust alight?

When he had written this, the crowd of disciples was overwhelmed with amazement, but the Patriarch rubbed off the stanza with his shoe, lest jealous ones should do me injury. The next night he invited me secretly to his room, and expounded the Diamond Sutra to me. When he came to the sentence, "One should use one's mind in such a way that it will be free from any attachment," I at once became thoroughly enlightened, and realized that all things in the universe are the Essence of Mind itself. "Who would have thought," I said to the Patriarch, "that the Essence of Mind is intrinsically pure!..." Thus, to the knowledge of no one, the Dharma was transmitted to me at midnight, and I became the Sixth Patriarch.





Buddhism / Mahayana / Zen (Chan) 4196 | 
Sutra of Hui Neng 1 







P assions consist of conceptualizations. The ultimate non-existence of these conceptualizations and imaginary fabrications--that is the purity that is the intrinsic nature of the mind. Misapprehensions are passions. The ultimate absence of misapprehensions is the intrinsic nature of mind. The presumption of self is passion. The absence of self is the intrinsic nature of mind.




Buddhism / Mahayana / Madhyamaka 4195 | 
Holy Teaching of Vimalakirti 3 







T his is a wonderful, unique discourse:
The living self is the image of the Supreme Being.
It is neither old nor a child;
Neither it suffers pain, nor in death's snare is caught;
It is not shattered nor dies;
In all time it is pervasive.
It feels not heat nor cold;
Neither has it friend nor foe;
It feels not joy nor sorrow:
All is its own; to it belongs all might.
It has neither father nor mother;
Beyond the limits of matter has it ever existed.
Of sin and goodness it feels not the touch--
Within the heart of each being it is ever awake.





Sikhism 4187 | 
Gaund, M.5, p. 868 







L et a man always consider himself as if the Holy One dwells within him.




Judaism 4183 | 
Ta'anit 11b 







H ave breathed into man of My spirit.




Islam 4182 | 
Qur'an 15.29 







N ow what do you think, Vasettha... is Brahma in possession of wives and wealth, or is he not?"
"He is not, Gotama."
"Is his mind full of anger, or free from anger?"
"Free from anger, Gotama."
"Is his mind full of malice, or free from malice?"
"Free from malice, Gotama."
"Is his mind tarnished, or is it pure?"
"It is pure, Gotama."
"Has he self-mastery, or has he not?"
"He has, Gotama."
"Now what do you think, Vasettha, are the brahmins versed in the Vedas in possession of wives and wealth, or are they not?"
"They are, Gotama."
"Have they anger in their hearts, or have they not?"
"They have, Gotama."
"Do they bear malice, or do they not?"
"They do, Gotama."
"Are they pure in heart, or are they not?"
"They are not, Gotama."
"Have they self-mastery, or have they not?"
"They have not, Gotama."
"Can there, then, be agreement and likeness between the brahmins with their wives and property, and Brahma, who has none of these things?"
"Certainly not, Gotama!"
"Then that these brahmins versed in the Vedas, who also live married and wealthy, should after death, when the body is dissolved, become united with Brahma, who has none of these things--such a condition of things is impossible!"...
"Now what do you think, Vasettha, will the bhikkhu who lives [according to the Dhamma] be in possession of women and of wealth, or will he not?"
"He will not, Gotama!"
"Will he be full of anger, or free from anger?"
"He will be free from anger, Gotama!"
"Will his mind be full of malice, or free from malice?"
"Free from malice, Gotama!"
"Will his mind be tarnished, or pure?"
"It will be pure, Gotama!"
"Will he have self-mastery, or will he not?"
"Surely he will, Gotama!"
"Then as you say, the bhikkhu is free from household and worldly cares, free from anger, free from malice, pure in mind, and master of himself; and Brahma also is free from household and worldly cares, free from anger, free from malice, pure in mind, and master of himself. Is there then agreement and likeness between the bhikkhu and Brahma?"
"There is, Gotama!"
"Then verily, that the bhikkhu who is free from household cares should after death, when the body is dissolved, become united with Brahma, who is the same--such a condition of things is in every way possible!"





Buddhism 4181 | 
Digha Nikaya xiii.31-34, Tevigga Sutta 







B eloved is man, for he was created in the image of God. But it was by a special love that it was made known to him that he was created in the image of God.




Judaism 4180 | 
Mishnah, Abot 3.18 







A nd the Lord said to Moses, "Say to all the congregation of the people of Israel, 'You shall be holy; for I the Lord your God am holy.'"




Judaism 4179 | 
Leviticus 19.1-2 







T hat which is the finest essence--this whole world has that as its soul. That is Reality. That is the Self. That art thou.




Hinduism 4178 | 
Chandogya Upanishad 6.8.7 







G od said, "Let us make man in our image, after our likeness."




Judaism 4177 | 
Genesis 1.26 







S o God created man in his own image, in the image of God he created him; male and female he created them.




Judaism 4155 | 
Genesis 1.27 







T hou art the sun
Thou art the air
Thou art the moon
Thou art the starry firmament
Thou art Brahman Supreme;
Thou art the waters--thou, the Creator of all!
Thou art woman, thou art man,
Thou art the youth, thou art the maiden,
Thou art the old man tottering with his staff;
Thou facest everywhere.

Thou art the dark butterfly,
Thou art the green parrot with red eyes,
Thou art the thunder cloud, the seasons, the seas.
Without beginning art Thou,
Beyond time and space.
Thou art He from whom sprang
The three worlds.












S o many bodies, so many opinions! But my Beloved, though invisible, is in all these bodies.
There is no life at all without the Beloved; the Self lives as each and every one.
What, then, 0 friend, are you searching for like a fool?
The object of your quest is within you, as the oil is in the sesame seed.
As the pupil is in the eye, so is the Lord in the body;
The deluded do not know Him, and search for Him without.
The lock of error shuts the gate; open it with the key of Love.
By opening the door, you shall wake the Beloved.
Kabir says: 0 brother, do not pass by such good fortune as this!





Others Beliefs / Litterature 3850 | 
Bijak, Shastri, 1941;pp.52-53,41 







L isten, riffraff: Do you want to be ALL?
Then go, go and become nothing.

You are nothing when you wed the One;
But, when you truly become nothing,
You are everything.

Regard yourself as a cloud drifting before your Sun;
Detach yourself from the senses,
And behold your intimacy with the Sun.

If you lose yourself on this path,
Then you will know for sure:
He is you, and you are He.





Islam / Sufism 3794 | 
in Chittock & Wilson, 1982; p. 10,112,123,120 







B eloved, I sought You here and there,
Asked for news of You from all I met.
Then I saw You through myself,
And found we were identical.
Now I blush to think I ever searched
For signs of You.
By day I praised You, but never knew it;
By night I slept with You without realizing it,
Fancying myself to be myself;
But no, I was You and never knew it.





Islam / Sufism 3789 | 
in Chittock & Wilson, 1982; pp. 120, 124 







W hen the mystery of the oneness of the soul and the Divine is revealed to you, you will understand that you are no other than God. ... Then you will see all your actions to be His actions and all your attributes to be His attributes and your essence to be His essence.

... Thus, instead of [your own] essence, there is the essence of God and in place of [your own] attributes, there are the attributes of God. He who knows himself sees his whole existence to be the Divine existence, but does not experience that any change has taken place in his own nature or qualities. For when you know yourself, your sense of a limited identity vanishes, and you know that you and God are one and the same.





Islam / Sufism 3778 | 
in Landau, 1959; pp. 83-84 







T hou art wise, and Wisdom, which is the Fountain of Life, floweth from Thee; and compared with Thy Wisdom, the knowledge of all mankind is folly. Thou art wise, and didst exist prior to all the most ancient things; and Wisdom was born of Thee. Thou art wise, and hast not learned aught from another, nor acquired Thy Wisdom from anyone else. Thou art wise; and from Thy Wisdom Thou didst cause to emanate a ready Will, an agent and artist as it were, to draw being from out of the Void, as light proceeds from the eye. Thou drawest from the Source of light without an intermediary, and producest everything without a means…




Judaism 3771 | 
The Royal Crown; Zangwill, 1923, 1974; pp. 82-88 







T hou art God, who by Thy Divinity supportest all things formed; and upholdest all creatures by Thy Unity. Thou art God, and there is no distinction between Thy Godhead, Unity, Eternity or Existence; for all is one mystery; and although each of these attributes is variously named, yet all of them point to One.




Judaism 3770 | 
The Royal Crown; Zangwill, 1923, 1974; pp. 82-88 







Y ou do not possess intelligence, nor do you possess ignorance;
Nor do you possess a mixture of these two.
You are, yourself, Intelligence-
An Intelligence that never ceases, never strays.





Hinduism 3732 | 
#57, Reprinted from Abhayananda, S., Dattatreya: The Song Of The Avadhut, Olympia, Wash., Atma Books, 1992 







I have neither Guru nor initiation;
I have no discipline, and no duty to perform.
Understand that I'm the formless sky;
I'm the self-existent Purity.

You are the one Purity! You have no body.
You are not the mind; you're the supreme Reality.
"I'm the Self, the supreme Reality!"
Say this without any hesitancy.

Why do you weep, 0 mind?
Why do you cry?
Take the attitude: "I am the Self!"
Drink the supreme nectar of Unity.





Hinduism 3731 | 
#54to56, Reprinted from Abhayananda, S., Dattatreya: The Song Of The Avadhut, Olympia, Wash., Atma Books, 1992 







Y ou are the ultimate Reality; have no doubt about this.
The Self is not something to be known by the mind;
The Self is the very one who knows.
How, then, could you think to know the Self?





Hinduism 3726 | 
#42, Reprinted from Abhayananda, S., Dattatreya: The Song Of The Avadhut, Olympia, Wash., Atma Books, 1992 







Y ou can't be heard, or smelled, or tasted;
You can't be seen, or sensed by touch.
Truly, you're the ultimate Reality;
Why, then, should you be troubled so?

Neither birth, nor death, nor the active mind,
Nor bondage, nor liberation, affects you at all.
Why then, my dear, do you grieve in this way?
You and I have no name or form.

0 mind, why are you so deluded?
Why do you run about like a frightened ghost?
Become aware of the indivisible Self.
Be rid of attachment; be happy and free!

Truly, you're the unchanging Essence of everything!
You're the unmoving Unity; you're boundless Freedom.
You have neither attachment nor aversion;
Why, then, do you worry and succumb to desire?





Hinduism 3715 | 
#16 to 19, Reprinted from Abhayananda, S., Dattatreya: The Song Of The Avadhut, Olympia, Wash., Atma Books, 1992 







Y ou, also, are the One! Why don't you understand?
You're the unchanging Self, the same within everyone.
You're truly illimitable; you'. the all-pervading Light.
For you, how can there be any distinction between the day and the night?

Understand that the Self is continuous Being,
The One within all, without any division.
The "I" is both the subject and the supreme object of meditation;
How can you see two in That which is one?

Neither birth -nor death pertain to you;
You have never been a body.
It is well known that "All is Brahman";
The scriptures have stated this in various ways.





Hinduism 3713 | 
#11 to 13, Reprinted from Abhayananda, S., Dattatreya: The Song Of The Avadhut, Olympia, Wash., Atma Books, 1992 







Y ou are the Self, the infinite Being, the pure, unchanging Consciousness, which pervades everything. Your nature is bliss and your glory is without stain. Because you identify yourself with the ego, you are tied to birth and death. Your bondage has no other cause.




Hinduism 3704 | 
Vivekachudamani; Prahhavananda, 1947, p.97 







U tterly destroy the ego. Control the many waves of distraction which it raises in the mind. Discern the Reality and realize "I am That."
You are pure Consciousness, the witness of all experiences. Your real nature is joy. Cease this very moment to identify yourself with the ego.





Hinduism 3703 | 
Vivekachudamani; Prahhavananda, 1947, p.97 







T he fool thinks, "I am the body"; the intelligent man thinks, "I am an individual soul united with the body." But the wise man, in the greatness of his knowledge and spiritual discrimination, sees the Self as the only reality and thinks, "I am Brahman."




Hinduism 3702 | 
Vivekachudamani; Prahhavananda, 1947, p. 69 







M an is like a bow held in the hand of God's Power. God employs him in various tasks. In reality, the agent is God, not the bow. The bow is an instrument and a means. But for the sake of the maintenance of the world it is unaware and heedless of God. Tremendous indeed is the bow that becomes aware of the Bowman's hand!




Islam / Sufism 3317 | 
The Sufi Path of Love: The Spiritual Teachings of Rumi, pp. 58-59, Trans. William C. Chittick. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1983 







M an is called a rational animal; therefore, he is two things. What feeds his animality in this world is passion and desire; but the food for his essential part is knowledge, wisdom and the vision of God. Man's animal nature avoids the Real, and his human nature flies from this world. One of you is an unbeliever, and another of you is a believer. (Koran 64:2).




Islam / Sufism 3302 | 
Signs of the Unseen: The Discourses of Jalaluddin Rumi, p. 59, Trans. W.M. Thackston, Jr. Putney, Vermont: Threshold Books, 1994 







W e and our existences are nonexistences. Thou art Absolute Existence showing Thyself as perishable things.




Islam / Sufism 3293 | 
The Sufi Path of Love: The Spiritual Teachings of Rumi, p. 24, Trans. William C. Chittick. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1983 







T he buddha is your real body, your original mind.




Buddhism / Mahayana / Zen (Chan) 3245 | 
The Zen Teaching of Bodhidharma. Trans. Red Pine. New York: North Point Press, 1987. The Zen Teaching of Bodhidharma. Trans. Red Pine. New York: North Point Press, 1987, p. 43 







Y ou are the supreme Brahman, infinite, yet hidden in the hearts of all creatures. You pervade everything.




Hinduism 3209 | 
Shvetashvatara Up. 3:7, p.223 in The Upanishads. Trans. Eknath Easwaran. Tomales, CA.: Nilgiri Press, 1987 







K now in the first place that the God you seek is within yourself. He is the life and soul of the universe and to attain Him is the supreme purpose of life. Evil and sorrow are due to your belief that you are separate from this universal Truth. The ego has set up this wall of separation. Have a strong and intense longing to realize Him, that is, to know that your life is one with the life of the universe. Then surrender up the ego by constant identification with Him through prayer, meditation and performance of all action without desiring their fruit. As you progress on this path, which is the path of devotion, knowledge and self-surrender, your attachment to the unrealities of life will slacken, and the illusions of the mind will be dispelled. Now your heart will be filled with divine love, and your vision purified and equalized, and your actions will become the spontaneous outflow of your immortal being, yielding you the experience of true joy and peace. This is the culmination of human endeavor and fulfillment of the purpose of life




Hinduism 3160 | 
In the Vision of God, Volume 1, by Swami Ramdas, pp 118-119 







I n this world of many he who sees the One, in this ever-changing world, he who sees Him who never changes, as the Soul of his own soul, as his own Self - he is free, he is blessed, he has reached the goal.

Therefore know that thou art He; thou art the God of this universe - tat tvam asi - (thou art That).

All these various ideas that I am a man or a woman, or sick or healthy, or strong or weak, or that I hate or I love, or have a little power, are but hallucinations. Away with them! What makes you weak? What makes you fear? You are the One Being in the universe. What frightens you?

Stand up then and be free. Know that every thought and word that weakens you in this world is the only evil that exists. Whatever makes men weak and fear is the only evil that should be shunned. What can frighten you?

If the suns come down, and the moons crumble into dust, and systems after systems are hurled into annihilation, what is that to you? Stand as a rock; you are indestructible. You are the Self, the God of the universe. Say: "I am Existence Absolute, Bliss Absolute, Knowledge Absolute, I am He." And like a lion breaking its cage, break your chain and be free for ever. What frightens you, what holds you down? Only ignorance and delusion; nothing else can bind you.





Hinduism 3156 | 
excerpt from Jnana-Yoga, Immortality, Swami Vivekananda, pg 164 







C ome now, noble souls, and take a look at the splendor you are carrying within yourselves! But if you do not let go of yourself completely, if you do not drown yourself in this bottomless sea of the Godhead, you cannot get to know this divine light.




Christianity 3082 | 
Pfeiffer, Frantz, and Evans, C de B., trans. Meister Eckhart. London: John M. Watkins, 1924, 193 1, Vol. 1: 118, 157, 221-222, 287, 338, 348, 363, 429, and Vol. 2: 41, 114. 







S urely you know that you are God's temple, where the Spirit of God dwells. Anyone who destroys God's temple will himself be destroyed by God, because the temple of God is holy; and you are that temple.




Christianity 3075 | 
I Corinthians 12:4-11 and I Corinthians 3:16-17, The New English Bible. New York: Oxford University Press, 1961. 







O ur original Buddha-Nature is, in highest truth, devoid of any trace of objectivity. It is void, omnipresent, silent, pure; it is glorious and mysterious peaceful joy-and that is all. Enter deeply in it by awakening to it yourself. That which is before you is it, in all its fullness, utterly complete. There is naught besides. Even if you go through all the stages of a Bodhisattva's progress toward Buddhahood, one by one, when at last, in a single flash, you attain to full realization, you will only be realizing the Buddha-Nature that has been with you all the time; and by all the foregoing stages you will have added to it nothing at all. You will come to look upon those aeons of work and achievement as no better than unreal actions performed in a dream. That is why the Tathagata [the Buddha] said: I truly attained nothing from complete, unexcelled Enlightenment.




Buddhism / Mahayana / Zen (Chan) 3023 | 
Blofeld John, trans. The Zen Teachings of Huang Po, New York: Grove Press, 1958, p131. 







T he Supreme Lord dwells in the heart of all beings, and by
His magic power of illusion
He causes them to move about like wooden dolls on a spinning wheel.

Give your whole heart to that Supreme Lord, seek refuge in Him alone;
By His Grace you will find perfect peace and the abode of immortal life.

Go deeper and deeper within yourself until nothing is left-then fight!
No one on earth is more dear to me than you.
That is why I tell you all this …

Abandon all hope of gain from this world and take refuge in me alone;
I will wash away your sins and free you from every evil.
You will never grieve again,

Fix your mind on me, think of yourself as me, worship me, sacrifice to me, honor me as your own Self, and you will surely come to me. This I promise you, for you are dear to me …

Arjuna! Have you heard me? Have my words hit their mark?





Hinduism 3013 | 
Chapter 18, translated by Jonathan Star and Julle Lal, the Inner Treasure, Tarcher Putnam. 







W hen the mysterious unity between the soul and the Divine becomes clear, you will realize that you are none other than God. You will see all your actions as His actions; all your features as His features; all your breaths as His breath.




Islam / Sufism 3006 | 
Manheim, Ralph, trans. Creative Imagination in the Sufism of Ibn 'Arabi. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1969, pp. 174-175. 







K now, 0 beloved, that man was not created in jest
or at random, but marvelously made
and for some great end.





Islam / Sufism 2853 | 
Essential Sufism, by James Fadiman & Robert Frager, Harper SanFrancisco, p.5 







T hen a man sees that the Kingdom of Heaven is truly within us; and seeing it now in himself, he strives with pure prayer to keep it and strengthen it there.




Christianity / Orthodoxy 2811 | 
Nicephorus the Solitary, adapted from Writings from the Philokalia on the Prayer of the Heart, translated by E. Kadloubosky and G. E. H. Palmer (London: Faber & Faber, 1990). 







T he Spirit itself beareth witness with our spirit, that we are the children of God:
And if children, then heirs; heirs of God, and join theirs with Christ; if so be that we suffer with him, that we may also be glorified together.
For I reckon that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory which shall be revealed in us.





Christianity 2789 | 
St. Paul, Romans 8:16-23 (AV), taken from the 1611 King James Version of the Bible 







M an himself is the source of all his troubles, for the light of God pours over him eternally. But through his all-too-bodily existence man comes to cast a shadow, so that the light cannot reach him.




Judaism / Hassidism 2743 | 
Martin Buber’s ten rungs, collected Hassidic saying, p.20 







I AM NOW seventy-four years old. And yet I feel that I am an infant. I feel clearly that in spite of all the changes I am a child. My Guru told me; that child, which is you even now, is your real self. Go back to that state of pure being, where the I am" is still in its purity before it got contaminated with "this I am" or "that I am." Your burden is of false self-identifications-abandon them all. My Guru told me-"Trust me. I tell you; you are divine. Take it as the absolute truth. Your joy is divine, your suffering is divine too. All comes from God. Remember it always. You are God, your will alone is done." I did believe him and soon realized how wonderfully true and accurate were his words. I did not condition my mind by thinking: I am God, I am wonderful, I am beyond." I simply followed his instruction, which was to focus the mind on pure being I am," and stay in it. I used to sit for hours together, with nothing but the I am" in my mind and soon peace and joy and a deep all embracing love became my normal state. In it all disappeared-myself, my Guru, the life lived, the world around me. Only peace remained and unfathomable silence.




Hinduism 2704 | 
I Am That: Talks with Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj, translated from the Marathi recordings by Maurice Frydman; edited by Sudhakar S. Dikshit. Durham, North Carolina, The Acorn Press, 1982 (11th printing 2000), P. 239. 







T o sinners and vile men there is vileness outside, but not to good men. So the wicked see this universe as a hell, and the partially good see it as heaven, while the perfect beings realize it as God Himself. Only when a man sees this universe as God does the veil fall from his eyes; then that man, purified and cleansed, finds his whole vision changed. The bad dreams that have been torturing him for millions of years all vanish, and he who was thinking of himself as either a man or a god or a demon, he who was thinking of himself as living in low places, in high places, on earth, in heaven, and so on, finds that he is really omnipresent; that all time is in him, and that he is not in time; that all the heavens are in him, that he is not in any heaven; and that all the gods that man ever worshipped are in him, and that he is not in any one of those gods. He was the manufacturer of gods and demons, of men and plants and animals and stones. And the real nature of man now stands unfolded to him as being higher than heaven, more perfect than this universe of ours, more infinite than infinite time, more omnipresent than the omnipresent ether.




Hinduism 2692 | 
"Vedanta: Voice of Freedom", Vedanta Society of St. Louis, 205 S. Skinker Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63105. 







I t may frighten many of you, but you will understand it by degrees. The living God is within you, and yet you are building churches and temples and believing all sorts of imaginary nonsense. The only God to worship is the human soul in the human body. Of course all animals are temples too, but man is the highest, the Taj Mahal of temples. If I cannot worship in that, no other temple will be of any advantage. The moment I have realized God sitting in the temple of every human body, the moment I stand in reverence before every human being and see God in him, that moment I am free from bondage. Everything that binds vanishes, and I am free.




Hinduism 2691 | 
"Vedanta: Voice of Freedom", Vedanta Society of St. Louis, 205 S. Skinker Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63105. 







Y ou are God and so am I.
Who obeys whom? Who worships whom? You are the highest temple of God. I would rather worship you than any temple, image or bible.





Hinduism 2690 | 
"Vedanta: Voice of Freedom", Vedanta Society of St. Louis, 205 S. Skinker Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63105. 







I mpart to us those vitalizing forces
that come, 0 Earth, from deep within your body,
your central point, your navel; purify us wholly.
The Earth is mother; I am son of Earth.
The Rain-giver is my father; may he shower on us
blessings! …





Hinduism 2627 | 
Rig Veda 5.84, from The Vedic Experience: Mantramanjari by Raimundo Pannikar (Delhi: Motilal Banarsidas, 1977). 







W hen the twofold passions are destroyed, and the twofold hindrances are cleared away, and the twofold egolessness is fully understood, and the inconceivable transformation death of the Bodhisattva is attained - that which remains is the self-nature of the Tathagatas. When the teachings of the Dharma are fully understood and are perfectly realized by the disciples and masters, that which is realized in their deepest consciousness is their own Buddha-nature revealed as Tathagata.




Buddhism / Mahayana 2610 | 
Ch XII, p.346, in Dwight Goddard, A Buddhist bible 







W e are taught that this Buddha-nature immanent in every one is eternal, unchanging, auspicious. Is not this which is born of the Womb of Tathagatahood the same as the soul-substance that is taught by the philosophers? The Divine Atman as taught by them is also claimed to be eternal, inscrutable, unchanging, imperishable. Is there, or is there not a difference?
The Blessed One replied: No, Mahamati, my Womb of Tathagatahood is not the same as the Divine Atman as taught by the philosophers. What I teach is Tathagatahood in the sense of Dharmakaya, Ultimate Oneness, Nirvana, emptiness, unbornness, unqualifiedness, devoid of will-effort. The reason why I teach the doctrine of Tathagatahood is to cause the ignorant and simple-minded to lay aside their fears as they listen to the teaching of egolessness and come to understand the state of non-discrimination and imagelessness.





Buddhism / Mahayana 2583 | 
Ch.IV, p.314, in Dwight Goddard, A Buddhist bible 







T here is no human nature that is not good. Therefore there is no innate knowledge that is not good. Innate knowledge is the equilibrium before the feelings are aroused. It is the state of broadness and extreme impartiality. It is the original substance that is absolutely quiet and inactive. And it is possessed by all men. However, people cannot help being darkened and obscured by material desires. Hence they must study in order to get rid of the darkness and obscuration. But they cannot add or subtract even an iota from the original substance of innate knowledge. Innate knowledge is good. The reason why equilibrium, absolute quiet, broadness, and impartiality are not complete in it is that darkness and obscuration have not been entirely eliminated and its state of preservation is not yet complete. The substance and function [you refer to] are the substance and function of innate knowledge. How can it transcend them?




Confucianism / Neo Confucianism 2444 | 
Wang Wen-ch'eng Kung ch'uan-shu, or Complete Works of Wang Yang-ming, Instruction for a Practical Living, 2:38a-39a, in Wing-Tsit Chan, Chinese Philosophy, Chapter 35 





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